Art History & Art Conservation

DEPARTMENT OF

Art History & Art Conservation

DEPARTMENT OF

Art History & Art Conservation

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Art History Graduate Courses

MA students may take one graduate course in another department as a part of their degree. You need to consult with that professor and department to get permission to take the course and follow the registration procedure for that course/department.

Courses at the 800 and 900 levels (purely graduate courses) are available to MA and Ph.D. students. You can check times for these courses on SOLUS. To register, please contact the Art History assistant, Dawn Lloyd (art.history@queensu.ca). Courses at the 400/800 level are open only to 4th-year undergraduate students and MA students (not to Ph.D. students). There are only four spaces for graduate students in each of these courses, which is generally sufficient, but we will consult with the instructor if necessary. If you wish to do an internship at the Agnes, you should consult with the relevant curator as soon as possible (the deadline for applying for Winter term is in October).Art History MA and Ph.D. students may also take the Art Conservation courses listed below, with permission of the instructor. These are Art History & Art Conservation courses and therefore do not count as a course from another department.

Graduate Seminars 2017-2018

FALL TERM:

Topics in Visual and Material Culture II: Image, Object, Thing: Theories of Visuality and Materiality

ARTH 813 (3.0)

This course will introduce graduate students to the theories of visuality and materiality that have functioned and continue to function as “dangerous supplements” to art history. We will explore how different concepts of images, objects, and things might be mobilized in a critical art historical practice. In doing so we will analyse the debates and historiography of visual and material culture studies, with particular attention paid to the role of critical gender analyses mobilized (or not) by the texts under consideration. Readings will include work by LeoraAuslander, MiekeBal, Bill Brown, Whitney Davis, James Elkins, Richard Grassby, Martin Heidegger, W.J.T. Mitchell, Marcia Pointon, Jules David Prown, and Michael Yonan. For their research projects, students will choose between a methodological paper, exploring the methods of visual and material culture studies in relation to their own areas of research interest, and a historiographical paper considering selected texts of visual and/or material culture studies.

Instructor: A. Morehead

Medieval Art I: Eye-witness Accounts of the High Middle Ages

ARTH 837 (3.0)

A study of a handful of significant medieval “eye-witness” accounts from medieval France and England c. 1200-1300 including the stained glass of Canterbury Cathedral, the sketchbook of Vuillard de Honnecourt, the Chronica Majora of Matthew Paris and his saint’s lives, and the Hereford Mappa Mundi.

Instructor: M. Reeve

Cultural Heritage Preservation: Europe 1910–2000

​ARTH 860 (3.0)

This graduate-only seminar will focus on themes of cultural heritage preservation in Europe during the 20th century, more specifically the impact of the two world wars and the Balkans conflict of the 1990s. We will examine the protection of cultural objects in preparation for war, the damage and destruction of patrimony during war, the looting of portable heritage, and various responses to looting, damage and destruction. The responses will include: the documentation of damage in written reports and photographs; approaches to the recovery and restitution of looted objects; the stages of repair, restoration and reconstruction to art and the built environment; the development of legal agreements and heritage organizations to curb the destruction and looting of cultural objects during conflict; as well as other more emotional and poignant human responses to loss. Among the readings will be extracts from war diaries to provide a sense of how individuals lived amidst the destruction. While the material to be examined does not include what is happening today to cultural objects as a consequence of armed conflict in areas of the Persian Gulf, the Middle East, Central Asia and Africa, numerous precedents were set during the years we will be considering.

Instructor: C. Hoeniger

History of Photography I

ARTH 862 (3.0)

The course will examine photographs as art, fact, and artifact through images, readings, and field research. In our focus on materiality, meaning, and institutional discourse, we will look at how photographs are created, circulated, and viewed across time and space, paying particular attention to how they function as “working objects in their own time” (Frizot). Readings and assignment topics will be geared to student interests wherever possible. For example, the first photographically illustrated art text published in Canada (1863) and two subsequent publications may be used as the basis of a collaborative research project and potential exhibition. Equally, the work of Edward Burtynsky and other contemporary photographers may be examined. As a way to study the way in which the meaning of a photograph is shaped by institutional discourse and professional practice, visits to collections on campus and to major collections in Ottawa, Toronto, and/or Montreal are planned.

Instructor: J. Schwartz

Agnes Etherington Art Centre Practicum

ARTH 880 (3.0)

Fall, winter, or summer. Various instructors.

​Directed Research in a Cultural Institution

ARTH 890 (3.0)

This course is intended to provide graduate students an opportunity to undertake a directed research project in an art gallery, museum, or archive. The research will focus on some aspect of the chosen institution's collection and will be supervised by a specialist in that area who works at the institution or co-supervised by such a specialist and a faculty member. Fall, winter, or summer.

Directed Reading

ARTH 897 (3.0)

Individual directed reading course under the guidance of a faculty member in an area of the instructor's expertise. Fall or Winter. Offered by permission of instructor only. Students interested in pursuing a Directed Reading should contact the faculty member they would like to work with to discuss a possible topic and work plan.


WINTER TERM:

Studies in the History of Renaissance Painting Technique: Materials and Techniques in Early Netherlandish Painting, with focus on Hieronymus Bosch

ARTH 807 (3.0)

An in-depth study of Renaissance painting techniques in Italy and/or Northern Europe. Selected issues of technique and conservation will be examined within a broader art-historical framework.

Instructor: R. Spronk

Museums, Collecting, and Culture I: Decolonizing the Museum – Cultural Heritage and First People

ARTH 434/810 (3.0)

Given the colonial roots of western museums, the historical relationship between museums, art galleries and the Indigenous Peoples of North American has been fraught with conflict, disjuncture, and political interventions. Over the past several decades, new museum and curatorial practices have attempted to “decolonize” the institution. This has engendered new understandings of collections, insights into the core function of contemporary curatorial practice, new models of institutional partnerships, and broad inter-cultural collaborations. These encounters have called into question the role of museums, collections, and the disciplinary formations that are associated with them, principally anthropology and art history. But is it even possible to decolonize the western museum and art gallery? To what degree is power really shifted or shared in these new arrangements? Are community-based museums “Indigenizing,” or simply reproducing old colonial structures of knowledge and power? This course uses a case-study approach to track and critically appraise the evolving relationship between Museums and Indigenous peoples in North America in order to contextualize and understand the emerging issues in contemporary curatorial and museum practice concerning representation, repatriation, sacred materials, and the management of tangible and intangible cultural heritage.

Instructor: N. Vorano

Studies in Italian Renaissance Art I: The Stuff of Renaissance Art: Stone, Glass, Clay, Metal, Paint...

ARTH 485/840 (3.0)

This course will explore the materials of Renaissance art, both such well-known and prestigious media as oil paint, gold, marble, and bronze and cheaper materials, such as clay, glass, wax, leather, cloth, stucco, cork, and wood. Artists experimented with media, often mixing materials, by, for example, covering a sculpture made of wood, cork and tow with gesso, painting it, and then clothing it in fabric dipped in more gesso. Jewels and colored glass were inserted into bronze and marble sculptures and painted panels, and sculptures made of tinted wax were given human hair. Paintings were done on copper, stone, and ivory, as well as on the familiar panel or canvas. We will explore such questions as the ways in which cost of materials, their geographical sources, and methods of manufacture relate to meaning, examining how the heterogeneous stuff of Renaissance art conveys notions of class, gender, physical beauty, and spiritual power. This course thus challenges the traditional idea of the Renaissance as a succession of realistic perspectival paintings that create a window onto the world, in which the materiality of the work is irrelevant. We will explore instead a messier, more physical side of Renaissance art.

Instructor: U. D'Elia

Studies in Baroque and Rococo: Taking Rococo Seriously: French Rococo Painting and Décor and its International Diffusion

ARTH 854 (3.0)

This course will explore in particular Rococo’s links with sociability and the institution of the salon, with the role of women in society, with ideas of health and euphoria, and with spirituality.

Instructor: G. Bailey

Agnes Etherington Art Centre Practicum

ARTH 880 (3.0)

Fall, winter, or summer. Various instructors.

Directed Research in a Cultural Institution

ARTH 890 (3.0)

This course is intended to provide graduate students an opportunity to undertake a directed research project in an art gallery, museum, or archive. The research will focus on some aspect of the chosen institution's collection and will be supervised by a specialist in that area who works at the institution or co-supervised by such a specialist and a faculty member. Fall, winter, or summer.

Directed Reading

ARTH 897 (3.0)

Individual directed reading course under the guidance of a faculty member in an area of the instructor's expertise. Fall or Winter. Offered by permission of instructor only. Students interested in pursuing a Directed Reading should contact the faculty member they would like to work with to discuss a possible topic and work plan.


Art Conservation Courses open to Art History graduate students (with permission of the instructor):

Conservation Principles

ARTC 801
* Permission of the instructor needed
Coordinator: Fiona Graham (fall and winter terms, Wednesday 8.30 – 9.20)

History Technology and Conservation of Paintings

ARTC 821
* Permission of the instructor needed
Instructor: Patricia Smithen (fall term, Tuesday 8.30-9.20 and Thursday 11.30 – 12.30)

History Technology and Conservation of Paper Objects

ARTC 831
* Permission of the instructor needed
Instructor: Rosaleen Hill (fall term, Monday 8.30 – 10)