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Queen's University
 

Lynda Jessup

Queen's University

Department of Art History and Art Conservation

Ontario Hall

Kingston
, Ontario K7L 3N6 

(613)533 - 6000, ext. 77343

(613)533 - 6891



Lynda Jessup (B.A., McMaster University, and Ph.D., University of Toronto) works in the field of visual cultural studies, specializing in Native North American and Canadian visual culture. Her practice is interdisciplinary, focusing on research in museum representation, environmental history, art and tourism, and art historiography.



Books

Negotiations in a Vacant Lot: Studying the Visual in Canada
edited by Lynda Jessup, Erin Morton and Kirsty Robertson,
McGill-Queen’s University Press, forthcoming.
                                                       
The papers in this collection reflect on potential futures of visual studies in Canada cognizant of the national/ist rubric imposed on it by the formation of the larger discipline of art history in the 19th century. Together, they ask: Is “Canada” (or, for that matter, any other nation) still relevant as a category of inquiry –as a site for knowledge production– now that we face neo-liberalism, corporate globalization, and what has been described as a “post-national”landscape? Drawing from a pool of scholars central to their fields of research, this collection is designed to generate discussion across the range of formations the contributors represent, from established to emergent, including art history and visual culture studies, globalization studies, cultural studies, women’s studies, environmental studies, and communication studies –all of which now embrace visual methodologies as an important aspect of research in their fields.

barbeaucover.png

Around and About Marius Barbeau: Modelling Twentieth-Century Culture
edited by Lynda Jessup, Andrew Nurse and Gordon Smith,
Canadian Museum of Civilization, 2008.

 

Marius Barbeau (1883-1969) played a vital role in the shaping of  emergence of Canadian culture in the twentieth century. Around and About Marius Barbeau: Modelling Twentieth-Century Culture is designed to extend discussion about Barbeau beyond the life and work framework by providing critical and interpretive approaches to the different aspects of Barbeau. Rooted in the premise that his cultural work –in anthropology, fine arts, music, film, folklore studies, fiction, historiography– cannot be read uni-dimensionally, this book advances the idea that, by merging disciplinary perspectives about Barbeau, we can move toward deepening our evaluations and understandings of the situation around Barbeau.  The sixteen articles that comprise this book bear this idea out, suggesting that Barbeau’s cultural work needs to be considered from a variety of different perspectives, each of which carries with it complex and competing dynamics, as well as a critical and subject context. Together, they present alternative stances from which we might reflect on Barbeau’s historical situation and the implications of his work today.




aboriginal.jpg

On Aboriginal Representation in the Gallery

edited by Lynda Jessup with Shannon Bagg,
Canadian Museum of Civilization, 2002. 



 


In recognizing the established intellectual and institutional authority of Native North American artists, curators and academics working in cultural institutions and universities today, this publication serves as an important primer on key questions accompanying the changing representational practices of the community cultural centre, the public art gallery and the anthropological museum. In this anthology, Native North American and other contributors address current and provocative issues arising from Native North American historical and contemporary art, and its production, collection and exhibition. 





antimodernism.jpg

Antimodernism and Artistic Experience:

Policing the Boundaries of Modernity

edited by Lynda Jessup, University of Toronto Press, 2001.

 


Antimodernism is a term used to describe the international reaction to the onslaught of the modern world that swept across industrialized Western Europe, North America, and Japan in the decades around the turn of the twentieth century. Scholars in art history, anthropology, political science, history, and feminist media studies explore antimodernism as an artistic response to a perceived sense of loss - in particular, the loss of 'authentic' experience. Embracing the 'authentic' as a redemptive antidote to the threat of unheralded economic and social change, antimodernism sought out experience supposedly embodied in pre-industrialized societies - in medieval communities or 'oriental cultures,' in the Primitive, the Traditional, or Folk. In describing the ways in which modern artists used antimodern constructs in formulating their work, the contributors examine the involvement of artists and intellectuals in the reproduction and diffusion of these concepts. In doing so they reveal the interrelation of fine art, decorative art, souvenir or tourist art, and craft, questioning the ways in which these categories of artistic expression reformulate and naturalise social relations in the field of cultural production.



Scholarly Editions 



Thumbnail image of Nass River Indians PublicationNass River Indians (Reconstruction)

concept, research and sequencing by Lynda Jessup;
intertitle scans and digital reconstruction by Dale Gervais,
produced in collaboration with the National Archives of Canada, 2001. 



This 35 mm film is a reconstruction of the lost, 1928 film Nass River Indians, which was produced by Associated Screen News Ltd in Montreal specifically for use by the National Museum of Canada. It was first screened in 1928 in conjunction with the National Gallery of Canada "Exhibition of Canadian West Coast Art, Native and Modern," a show combining the work of Canadian west coast Aboriginal peoples with paintings and sculptures by prominent Euro-Canadian artists, chief among them the members of the Group of Seven. With the generous support of the National Archives of Canada, the film has been reconstructed as a postcolonial object, which includes introductory intertitles in English and Nisga'a. The film toured internationally in Unseen Cinema: Early American Avant-Garde Film 1893-1941, organized by the Anthology Film Archives and Deutsches Filmmuseum. 



Recent Articles

2012       

“Rethinking Relevance,” co-authored with Erin Morton and Kirsty Robertson, in Negotiations in a Vacant Lot: Studying the Visual in Canada, edited by Lynda Jessup, Erin Morton and Kirsty Robertson, McGill-Queen’s University Press, forthcoming.

The Group of Seven and the Tourist Landscape in Western Canada, or The More Things Change...Journal of Canadian Studies 37 (1): 144-79. Reprinted in “The Group of Seven and the Tourist Landscape in Western Canada, or the More Things Change…” in Interpreting Canada’s Past: A Post-Confederation Reader, ed. J.M. Bumstead, Len Kuffert and Michael Ducharme (Toronot: Oxford University Press, 2012).

2009

“Looking at Landscape in the Age of Environmentalism,” in Expanding Horizons: Painting and Photography of American and Canadian Landscape, 1860-1918, ed. Hilliard Goldfarb, (Montreal: Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, 2009), 93-95, 85, 115.
2008 [I misdated as 2007 the two entries below. Please move up to 2008:]

Marius Barbeau and Early Ethnographic Cinema, in Around and About Marius Barbeau: Modelling Twentieth-Century Culture, co-edited with Andrew Nurse and Gordon Smith, Canadian Museum of Civilization, 2007, pp. 269-304.

Around and About Marius Barbeau,  co-authored with Andrew Nurse and Gordon Smith, in [insert space]Around and About Marius Barbeau: Modelling Twentieth-Century Culture, co-edited with Andrew Nurse and Gordon Smith, Canadian Museum of Civilization, 2007, pp. 1-12.

2007  

Marius Barbeau and Early Ethnographic Cinema, in Around and About Marius Barbeau: Modelling Twentieth-Century Culture, co-edited with Andrew Nurse and Gordon Smith, Canadian Museum of Civilization, 2007, pp. 269-304.

Around and About Marius Barbeau,  inAround and About Marius Barbeau: Modelling Twentieth-Century Culture, co-edited with Andrew Nurse and Gordon Smith, Canadian Museum of Civilization, 2007, pp. 1-12.

Art for a Nation?, reprinted in John O’Brian and Peter White, Beyond Wilderness: The Group of Seven, Canadian Identity, and Contemporary Art, McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2007, pp. 187-92.

2006

Landscapes of Sport, Landscapes of Exclusion: The “Sportsman’s Paradise” in Late Nineteenth Century Canadian Painting,” Journal of Canadian Studies 40.1 (Winter 2005-06): 71-124.

2005

Confessions of a Selfish Teacher, College Quarterly 8.3 (Summer 2005).

2002

The Group of Seven and the Tourist Landscape in Western Canada, or The More Things Change...Journal of Canadian Studies 37 (1): 144-79. Reprinted in People, Places, and Times: Readings in Canadian Social History, vol. 2: Post-Confederation, ed., Cynthia R. Comacchio and Elizabeth Jane Errington (Toronto: Thomson-Nelson, 2006), pp. 462-82.

Hard Inclusion. In On Aboriginal Representation in the Gallery. Edited by Lynda Jessup with Shannon Bagg. Hull: Canadian Museum of Civilization. Pp. xi-xxviii.

Moving Pictures and Costume Songs at the 1927 "Exhibition of Canadian West Coast Art, Native and Modern." Canadian Journal of Film Studies 11 (1): 144-79. 2001

James Sibley Watson's Nass River Indians. In Unseen Cinema: Early American Avant-Garde Film 1893-1941. Edited by Bruce Posner. New York: Black Thistle Press/Anthology Film Archives. Pp. 116-20.

Antimodernism and Artistic Experience: An Introduction.
In Antimodernism and Artistic Experience: Policing the Boundaries of Modernity. Edited by Lynda Jessup. Toronto: University of Toronto Press. Pp. 3-9.

Bushwhackers in the Gallery: Antimodernism and the Group of Seven. In Antimodernism and Artistic Experience: Policing the Boundaries of Modernity. Edited by Lynda Jessup. Toronto: University of Toronto Press. Pp. 130-52. 1999

Tin Cans and Machinery: Saving the Sagas and Other Stuff Visual Anthropology 12: 49-86. Reprinted in www.canadianfilm.ca, 2000, pp. 1-51. 1998

Prospectors, Bushwhackers, Painters: Antimodernism and the Group of Seven International Journal of Canadian Studies 17 (1): 193-214.



Current Projects 



Winners' History: Exhibiting the Group of Seven.
A study of recent exhibitions of the Group of Seven as sites of official nationalism in Canada, and of the ways in which national art histories function as an operative part of increasingly post-national processes of globalization.        



Honours

2010-11  Fulbright Scholar, Rockefeller Archive Center, New York.
2009   Award for Excellence in Graduate Student Supervision, School of Graduate Studies, Queen’s University.
2003   National Gallery of Canada Research Fellowship in Canadian Historical Art, National Gallery of Canada.
1998   Queen's University Alumni Award for Excellence in Teaching.
1994   Canadian Centre for the Visual Arts Research Fellowship in Historic Canadian Art, National Gallery of  Canada.

Undergraduate Teaching

ARTH-232  Canadian Art

ARTH-339  Canadian Art in the Twentieth Century
ARTH-433  Art, Tourism and Modernity

ARTH-434  Non-Western Art in Western Collections




Graduate Teaching

ARTH-804 Topics in Critical and Cultural Theory
ARTH-804 Art and Globalization
ARTH-805 Art Historiography: Environmental Studies in Art History
ARTH-806 Studies in Iconography: Critical Approaches to Landscape
ARTH-811 Museums, Marginality, and the Mainstream 

ARTH-864 Art, Tourism and Modernity

ARTH-868 Assigning a Category: Inuit Video

ARTH-871 Mediating Art and Culture 

Teaching Development

2003-05  Educational Development Faculty Associate, Centre for Teaching and Learning, Queen’s University
2003-05  Leader, Research Group: Rethinking the Survey, Centre for Teaching and Learning, Queen’s University



Graduate Thesis Supervision



In progress:

Cultural Studies Program

2011  
PhD Lara Fullenweider, "Teaching Loss: Cultural Productions of Reconciliation and Redress of Residential School Experiences in Canada."
PhD Barbara Meneley, Unsettling the Last Best West: Disturbing Mythologies in Mainstream Nationhood.
2010
PhD 
Linda Grussani, “The Exhibition of Indigenous Visual Culture in National Capital Institutions: Working towards Decolonization in Canada, Australia, the United States.”
MA Erin Sutherland, "Adrian Stimson and Terrance Houle: Exploring Indigenous Masculinities, Analytical Review."
2009
PhD
Mimi Gellman, “Between the Dreamtime and the GPS/the Metaphysics of Indigenous Mapping.”
PhD Shauna Shiels, “Neither Fine Art nor Craft: Situating Beadwork back within Indigenous Knowledge Systems.” (co-supervision)
Department of Art
2011
PhD Elysia French, “Sights of Desire; Sites of Demise/ The Landscape of Environmentalism in Contemporary Art.”
MA Jane Becker Nelson, "Picturing Power: Nationalism and Contemporary Photography in Northern North America."
2010
MA Elizabeth Diggon, “The Politics of Cultural Power: Canadian Participation at the Venice Biennale and the São Paulo Bienal, 1951-1970.”
MA Agnes Ladon, "The Visual Culture of Arctic Sovereignty: A.Y. Jackson, Lawren S. Harris and Canada’s Eastern Arctic Patrols."
2008 PhD Sarah E.K. Smith, “Exhibitions as Envoys: Art and the Construction of Mexican Identity in the New North America” (co-supervision)
2007
PhD Brianne Howard, “Cross-Cultural Negotiations: Three Collections of African Visual and Material Culture in Canada
    

Recently completed:

2012
PhD Susan Cahill, “Contested Terrains: Visualizing the Nation within Global Military Conflicts.”
2011
PhD Carla Taunton, “Performing Resistance/Negotiating Sovereignty: Performative Interventions by Indigenous Women Performance Artists in Colonial and Post-Colonial Canada, Australia and New Zealand.”
PhD Debra Antoncic, “Oddballs and Eccentrics (Les Hirsutes et Les Excentriques): Visual Arts and Artists in the Popular Press in Post-war Canada.”
MA Ellyn Clost, “Voluntourism: The Visual Economy of International Volunteer Program.”
MA Megan Bylsma, “Nationalism, Cultural Imperialism and the Emma Lake Artists’ Workshops.” (co-supervision)
MRP Alexandra Simpson, "Depicting and Performing Museums: Art Experiences through the Lens of Contemporary Photography."
MA
Elysia French, “Sights of Desire; Sites of Demise/ The Environment in the Works of Edward Burtynsky and Olafur Eliasson.”
MRP
Jessica Parker, “Beit Hatfutsot: Exhibiting Israeli National Ideology in the Diaspora Museum.” (co-supervision)

MRP
Duncan Links, “Challenging the Pecking Order with a Rubber Chicken: Humor in Canadian Folk Art.”
2010
PhD Andrea Terry, “‘Living History’ in Canada: Representing Victorian Culture in the Multicultural Present.”
MRP Michelle Bauldic, “Get Riel: The Use of Riel to Create and Signify Identity in Canada.”
2009
PhD Erin Morton, “Visions which Succeed: Regional Publics and Public Folk Art in Maritime Canada.”
MA Kaitlin Schwan, “HIV/AIDS and Identity Recovery: STITCHing the Self Back Together.”
MA Sarah Jones, “Filming the Folk Art-Genius: The ‘Documentation’ of Maud Lewis.”
2008
PhD Kristin Campbell, “Taste and Nation: Spaces of Viewing in London, 1775-1825.” (co-supervision)
MA Jocelyn Purdie, “The Neighbourhood Imaginary: Considerations of Local Art Production in Unconventional Public Spaces.” (co-supervision)
MA Sarah E.K. Smith, “Cultural Brokering: Art, National Identity, and the Influence of Free Trade.”
2007
PhD Kristy A. Holmes, “Negotiating the Nation: The Work of Joyce Wieland, 1968-1976.”(co-supervision)
MA Emily Jane Rothwell, “Spinning Public Yarns: Janet Morton's Knitted Works as Dialogues on Urban Locality, Ecological Projects, and Community Histories.” (co-supervision)
2006
PhD Shannon Bagg, “Artists, Art Historians, and the Value of Contemporary Inuit Art.”
PhD Kirsty M. Robertson, “Tear-Gas Epiphanies: New Economics of Protest, Vision, and Culture in Canada.”
PhD Robert Surdu, “Architectonics: A Study of Three Early Twentieth-Century Canadian Buildings and Their Role as Therapeutic Sanctuaries.”
MA Lindsay Leitch, “Gathering, Mending, Knitting: Craftivism and the Constructive Revolution.”
MA Anna Samulak, “Krieghoff in Context: Tourism and Colonialism.”
2005
PhD Brian Donnelly, “Picturing Words, Writing Images: Design Contingent Meaning.”
PhD Kamille Parkinson, “Philip John Bainbrigge and the Group of 1838: Imperial Landscapes and the Colonial Art Scene in Canada.”
MA Erin Morton, “Representing Region: Exhibiting Place in Nova Scotia.”
MA Taryn Sirove, “Pro-Feminist Men, Masculinities and the Habits Video Exhibition (1986): Re-covering a self-critique of patriarchy.” (co-supervision)
MA Andrea Terry, “Claiming Christmas for the Tourist: "Living History" at Dundurn Castle.”
2004
PhD J. Keri Cronin, “Manufacturing National Park Nature: Photography, Ecology, and the Wilderness Industry of Jasper National Park.”
PhD Andrea Kunard, “Promoting Culture Through Photography in the National Gallery of Canada and the Still Photography Division of the National Film Board of Canada.”
      
        
        
           
    



Kingston, Ontario, Canada. K7L 3N6. 613.533.2000