Faculty of Arts & Science
A place to learn, discover, think and do.

2014

On Tuesday, October 7, students studying at the Bader International Study Centre received their official BISC scarf in a ceremony in the Ballroom. The scarf—a navy blue knit with red stripes and the BISC logo—marks the students’ entry into the BISC and Queen’s community. This newly formed tradition is based on the venerable British varsity scarf, which is used to differentiate students attending the top colleges across the British university system.

Cuba's Carlos Varela returns to Kingston with Latin America's foremost Jazz Pianist, Aldo Lopez!!!

Thursday October 30th, 7:30pm Isabel Bader Centre for the Performing Arts, 390 King St W. The bar opens at 6:45.

ONE CULTURE, or THE COMMONALITIES AND DIFFERENCES BETWEEN THE ARTS AND THE SCIENCES

The claim of a rift between scientists and technologists on one hand, and humanists
on the other, is criticized on several grounds. Using examples from chemistry, poetry,
painting and ceramics a case is made for an underlying unity of science and the arts.
The common elements of these human activities are creation with craftsmanship,
concisely communicated, in a cross-cultural and altruistic way, with aesthetics figuring

The December 2014 exam schedule - dates and times- was posted to SOLUS last Friday, October 10.  Now your exam locations are also available.

Where do I find the schedule?

Warren (Smokey) Thomas was elected president of the Ontario Public Service Employees Union on April 20, 2007, after serving three terms (six years) as 1st Vice-President/Treasurer.

The 62-year old registered practical nurse has been an OPSEU activist for over 30 years, first beginning his leadership career as president of Local 431 at the Ontario Psychiatric Hospital in Kingston, Ontario. Here he represented more than 1,000 members before being elected to OPSEU’s Executive Board in 1993.

Come to a workshop facilitated by Queen’s Cross-Cultural Counsellor Arunima Khanna (Health, Counselling and Disability Services).

In this workshop, you will learn about resources that will support your academic and personal success, and tips on how to get past the rough spots.

Learn more about the Crossing Cultures Workshop

Queen’s students got an inside view of all the Isabel Bader Centre for the Performing Arts (also known as “the Isabel”) has to offer on Saturday during a special open house.

Learn more

Nine Queen’s University faculty members have been elected to the Royal Society of Canada, the highest number of inductees the university has had in one year. Fellowship in the RSC is one of the highest recognitions for Canadian academics in the arts, humanities, and the social and natural sciences. Seven of the nine electees are from the Faculty of Arts and Science!

We made the list created by the Huffington Post!

Yoga in India and the West -- A class that surveys the history and philosophy of yoga in India and the West.

Women actually might be more turned on by visual stimuli than men, they're just less likely to talk about it. Meredith Chivers, a researcher and professor at Queen's University, researched men and women's responses to erotic material, and found that women respond physically to a wider range of erotic imagery.

Barbara Reeves’ team of archaeologists accidently stumbled upon the first of 157 ancient images just days before leaving the Humayma excavation site in Jordan.  

Humayma – located in western Jordan – has been an excavation site since 1986. Even though researchers have conducted many archaeological surveys in and around the area for years, the numerous carvings on the rocks, known as petroglyphs, remained undiscovered until this summer.

The School of Computing's Dr. David Skillicorn is featured in the Kingston Whig Standard's coverage of recent technology leaks.

The privacy breach that happened this past weekend to actor Jennifer Lawrence and other Hollywood celebrities could happen again unless the technology to protect passwords is improved, says a Queen's University professor.

Orientation week is in full swing across campus with more than 4,000 first-year students participating in spirit-building activities. The fun continues Friday with the annual Sidewalk Sale, the surprise concert in the Miller Hall parking lot and numerous faculty-specific events. Orientation concludes Sunday as students prepare for their first day of classes on Monday.

Staff at the Isabel Bader Centre for the Performing Arts received a very special delivery this morning: a Steinway concert grand piano.

Renowned for their quality, Steinway pianos grace the stages of performance halls around the world and have been celebrated by artists from Glenn Gould to Billy Joel. A Steinway grand piano is made from over 12,000 individual parts, and typically takes nearly a year to make.

A Queen’s University graduate is in the running for one of Britain’s most prestigious art awards.

Ciara Phillips (Artsci’00) is one of four artists who made the shortlist for the Turner Prize earlier this year.

Currently living in Glasgow, Scotland, Ms. Phillips received a Bachelor of Fine Art at Queen’s before earning a Master of Fine Art in 2004 at the Glasgow School of Art.

Jason Millar, a PhD Candidate in the Department of Philosophy, spends a lot of time thinking about driverless cars. Though you aren’t likely to be able to buy them for 10 years, he says there are a number of ethical problems that need to be tackled before they go mainstream.

Brandon Turner leans over his keyboard and with a few key strokes shows what he’s spent this summer working on. A digital rendering of an enormous vertebra fossil appears on his computer screen, followed by a chipped femur and then the hulking skull of a haudrosaur, the duck-billed dinosaur of the Cretaceous period.

Here’s what kids at play have always liked to do: Race, climb, wrestle, hang, throw, balance, fence with sticks, jump from heights and gravitate toward sharp objects. Ideally, while escaping the watchful eye of grown-ups.

Here’s what today’s kids hear when they’re even flirting with such pursuits: Slow down, get down, put that down. No throwing, no sticks allowed, don’t jump from there. Don’t touch, that’s too dangerous, be careful. And for goodness sake, don’t go anywhere without an adult.

Tomorrow the Canadian Real Estate Association will announce home sales volume and price data for July and Queen’s real estate expert John Andrew is available to comment on these numbers.

Deep-sea sharks wield some surprisingly well-adapted eyes that help them see in the dark, according to new research.

Transparent patches of skin above their eyes and a unique arrangement of light-sensitive cells on their retinas, among other things, allow five species of bioluminescent deep-sea shark to collect and focus as much light as possible to hunt prey and find each other in the gloomy depths.

Following Japan’s 2011 tsunami, Kiyoshi Kurokawa – chairman of the Fukushima Accident Independent Investigation Commission – described the Fukushima disaster as a “profoundly man-made disaster that could and should have been foreseen and prevented.” It is this mentality that motivated the Japanese government to enact some of the world’s most stringent building codes after the devastating 1995 earthquake in Kobe. In contrast, developing states in earthquake prone regions often lack the institutions and financing that are required to bolster natural disaster preparedness.

Middle East Professor Ariel Salzmann and activist Azeezah Kanji cite specific examples of how Canadian media has misrepresented the ongoing assault and how the Harper government aims to fuel this conflict to ensure high prices for Tar Sands oil.

Like many students, Sarah Hasnain has spent her summer on the water. However, this biology PhD candidate has devoted her time to academic rather than leisure pursuits.

Ms. Hasnain’s research on the response of zooplankton communities to the spiny water flea, an invasive species in the Muskoka Watershed, earned her the inaugural Muskoka Summit on the Environment Research Award earlier this summer. The $7,500 award supports a graduate student’s environmental research within Muskoka in fields related to environmental science, resource studies and/or policy.

Andrea Craig Queen's University Economics NewsAndrea Craig, a doctoral student in the Department of Economics at Queen’s, has been invited to attend the prestigious Lindau Meeting on Economic Sciences in Lindau, Germany.

 

Christian Lloyd, Academic Director at the Bader International Study Centre (BISC) at Herstmonceux Castle, England, was recently in Kingston. Craig Leroux, Senior Communications Officer, caught up with him to talk about the student experience at the castle.

Craig Leroux: What brings you to Kingston?

Bill Nelson Department of Biology Queen's UniversityFollow the trail Bill Nelson’s research is blazing and you’ll end up in a room in the basement of the BioSciences Complex.

Queen’s and the Chinese Ministry of Land and Resources (MLR) renewed their two-decade-long relationship this week with the signing of a memorandum of understanding (MOU). Under the agreement, Queen’s will continue to provide training to Chinese officials and the MLR and its affiliates will continue to offer an internship program for Queen’s students.

A major dark matter project is making SNOLAB, located near Sudbury, its new home.

The underground science facility has been chosen to host the Super Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (SuperCDMS), an international, multimillion-dollar dark matter experiment currently based in Minnesota.

The SuperCDMS experiment was selected by U.S. funding agencies as one of its major second-generation dark matter projects, with support going toward expanding the science by building a more sensitive detector at SNOLAB.

Writing on behalf of 27 ethicists from across North America, Queen’s philosopher Udo Schuklenk and a team of five co-authors have written a commentary for the journal Nature on a controversial Facebook study.

Queen’s University researcher Ian Janssen (School of Kinesiology and Health Studies, Department of Public Health Sciences) has earned a place on Thomson Reuters’ Highly Cited Researchers list. He is the only Queen’s professor to make the list and one of only 88 researchers working in Canada on the 3,215 member list.

The international list includes scientists and researchers whose work is most often cited in other research papers.

Queen’s University has been a leading centre for education, research and outreach on urban and regional planning for almost 80 years, most recently through the School of Urban and Regional Planning (SURP), founded in 1970, and the Department of Geography, founded in 1960. As of July 1, 2014 SURP will join with the Department of Geography to form a new academic unit in the Faculty of Arts and Science.

The SOAR program aims to help ease the transition of our incoming first-year students and their families. Participants will have an opportunity to learn about academic expectations, resources, learning strategies, and common student transition issues. Learn more

Queen's University has a long-standing commitment to teaching and research in industrial relations. Its professional graduate programs in labour relations and human resource management are designed to prepare highly effective professionals in labour relations and human resource management who possess a balanced appreciation for all aspects of industrial relations and have the advanced skills and intellectual flexibility and advanced skills to function knowledgeably and analytically in their workplaces throughout their careers.

The Faculty of Arts and Science is happy to announce that as of July 1, 2014 the Industrial Relations Centre will now work within the Faculty. Queen’s University Industrial Relations Centre (IRC) is a leading provider of premium professional development programs in labour relations, human resources and organization development. IRC programs are designed for busy practitioners, delivered by subject matter experts, and grounded in adult learning principles.

Heather Aldersey and Norman Vorano have been appointed as the newest Queen’s National Scholars (QNS).

“The QNS program is a signature piece in the university’s commitment to ongoing faculty renewal, designed to attract early- or mid-career faculty who demonstrate exceptional promise as researchers and teachers,” says Principal Daniel Woolf. “Both Drs. Aldersey and Vorano are exceptional individuals who will bring compelling, interdisciplinary research programs to Queen’s in support of two growing fields.”

Forty performers will take to the stage in the Rotunda Theatre this week to share their experiences losing, growing, removing or flaunting their hair.

“We’re so glad that we are able to put on a production featuring some of Kingston’s most talented professional and community artists,” says Queen’s drama professor Kim Renders, the artistic co-ordinator of Hair Lines. “We have spoken word performances, movement pieces, and lecture-style talks all connected by music.”

Queen’s researchers are making new discoveries about Paul Kane’s paintings, an important collection of art for understanding 19th century Canada.  George Bevan (Classics) is using infrared light technology to peer underneath the oil of Kane’s paintings and see the original pencil drawings. Kane’s pencil drawings sketched in the field are the earliest depiction of 19th century Canadian and Aboriginal life. The artist took these sketches back to his Toronto studio in the 1850s and used oil paints to finish the artworks.

Krystle Maki believes her research into welfare surveillance in Ontario can make a difference in the world beyond the walls of academia.

“I have this vision of positive social change,” says Ms. Maki, a PhD candidate in the Department of Sociology. “There’s stigmatization on so many different fronts, and my research is intended to dismantle stereotypes. I also want to shed light on the labour conditions social assistance case workers often face and the single mothers within the system who are so often silenced.”

As an associate professor and director of the Queen’s Outreach Centre, Lynda Colgan is a woman who wears many hats. Not only does she work with Queen’s undergraduate and graduate students, but she also pursues her passion for teaching children and families about math.

It was this pursuit that ultimately earned Dr. Colgan the Partners in Research National Mathematics Ambassador Award. This honour recognizes the outstanding contribution for Canadians in the field of mathematics.

Forget heavy metal, they're talking light metal at Queen's University. Well, at least a light coating for metal anyway.

Queen's University chemistry professors Dr. Crudden and Dr. Horton teamed up two years ago to find a practical use for an organic to bond with metal.

Watch this video to learn more about how this discovery can be applied to everyday use.

According to a study by Queen’s researcher Christian Leuprecht, if the cost of policing in Canada is to become more sustainable there must be a discussion surrounding the extent of police service and how these are delivered.

A debate about the extent and delivery of police services must take place immediately, according to a study by Queen’s researcher Christina Leuprecht.

Queen’s University researchers Cathleen Crudden and Hugh Horton (Chemistry), along with students, postdoctoral fellows and other collaborators have developed a new process that allows organic compounds to bind to metal surfaces. This cutting-edge technology is now being patented and commercialized by PARTEQ and Green Centre Canada.

Departmental Fair: meet with faculty, staff, and students from 5 Schools and 22 Departments, Undergraduate Admissions Office, Graduate School, Law School, Medical School, Faculty of Education, and the International Programs Office. The departmental fair will be held from 10 am to 2 pm at Grant Hall. 

Lectures: we invite you to attend an interactive lecture:

The Faculty of Arts and Science at Queen's would like to invite March Break Open House attendees to join us for an interactive Psychology 100 lab:

Don't Spill Your Drink!
11 am-­noon or 1­2-1pm
School of Medicine, New Medical Building, Room 132A

Feminist Legal Studies Queen’s (FLSQ) is hosting “Arctic/Northern Women: Situating Law and Justice in Development and Equality,” a ground-breaking, interdisciplinary, and multinational conference on Feb. 28 and March 1 that will bring to campus experts in Indigenous, northern, and Arctic issues from Finland, Sweden, Norway, the U.S. and Canada.

Researchers, law practitioners, representatives of non-profits, and policy advocates will examine how their fast-evolving and intersecting fields are shaping contemporary Arctic/northern and Indigenous politics.

Julia Marsala (Artsci’14) is from a small farm town in Pennsylvania, so when she stepped into the megalopolis of Shanghai, with its more than 23 million people, she felt a little overstimulated, a little overwhelmed.

 “The sheer number of people on the streets – it was nothing I’d ever seen. It was culture shock, but not in a bad way,” she says. “The city and China in general forces you out of your comfort zone, and when you do that, you learn a lot about yourself.”

Queen’s University scientist Dr. John P. Smol goes deep below the surface of our lakes and rivers to uncover the secrets of our environmental history, written in mud and silt. His collaborator and half-brother, Dr. Jules Blais, is a University of Ottawa environmental toxicologist who studies the effects of industrial pollutants on ecological systems. Dr. Blais’ toxicological work helps define past environmental stressors, while Dr. Smol’s ecological work characterizes the ecosystem responses to these stressors.

The Ellis Hall active learning classrooms opened to students and instructors in January. Each of the three renovated classrooms offers unique configurations and technology that allow instructors to employ different teaching and learning strategies. Mark Kerr, Senior Communications Officer, visited a few classes early in January to observe how the spaces are impacting teaching and learning.


Click here to learn more

The Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures is announcing a study abroad program available to all Queen's University students in their third year who would like to spend fall semester 2014 at Fudan University in Shanghai.

The application is now open and the deadline is 28 February 2014. For more information about the program and application, please visit the Semester in Shanghai website.

Have Questions?

Call us at 613-533-2470 or email us.

Follow Us

  • Facebook
  • Twitter