2015

Elder Albert Marshall will be will be sharing about the Mi’kmaw principle of “Etuaptmumk” or “two-eyed seeing” and the process of “co-learning” that guided the Integrative Science Program (2001 – 2013) at CBU and concerning Mi’kmaw language, culture and wellness. This is Albert's first visit to Queen's University and a wonderful opportunity to hear from a Mi'kmaw knowledge keeper.

In the cultural safety training session offered by Four Directions Aboriginal Student Centre, participants sit in a circle – a non-hierarchical formation that allows people to see their interconnection, rather than their differences.

As Aboriginal Student Success Strategist with Four Directions Aboriginal Student Centre, Laura Maracle has led cultural safety training sessions at Queen’s University for the past five years. (University Communications)

With the Nobel Prize ceremony just a week away, Queen’s University took time to honour Professor Emeritus Arthur McDonald (Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy) on Thursday with a special send-off event.

Hundreds of well-wishers filled Grant Hall to mark Dr. McDonald being awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics, along with Takaaki Kajita of the University of Tokyo, “for their key contributions to the experiments which demonstrated that neutrinos change identities.” The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences made the announcement on Oct. 6.

Candle campaign shows solidarity with women living with domestic abuse.

A range of organizations provide support for female victims of domestic violence including housing, employment and rebound support. A new Canadian organization, One Spark, is providing support to women in a unique way – by providing funding to help victims of violence start their own businesses.

Thanks to Alfred and Isabel Bader, Queen’s art centre has added another Rembrandt painting to its collection – this time a remarkable, late-career masterpiece that had been privately owned and unavailable to scholars for much of its existence.

Portrait of a Man with Arms Akimbo, signed and dated 1658, will become part of the Agnes Etherington Art Centre’s permanent collection. The painting is a significant example of a dated portrait by Rembrandt from the 1650s, and one of the last works from the artist’s late career to enter a public collection.

Queen’s professor co-authors RSC panel report recommending further research to improve clean-up

Major spills in freshwater and marine ecosystems are rare, but critical and significant research gaps still remain in order to prevent future spills and rectify them if they occur, according to a new report co-authored by Queen’s University researcher Peter Hodson (Environmental Studies).

A new ranking of university programs by Maclean’s has Queen’s making the top 10 in all 10 categories.

Offered for the first time alongside the magazine’s annual university rankings, Maclean’s ranked universities in 10 different undergraduate programs – biology; business; computer science; education; engineering; environmental science; geology; mathematics; nursing and psychology.

A documentary worked on by Jennifer Ruth Hosek (Languages, Literatures, and Cultures) will premiere at the prestigious International Festival of New Latin American Cinema in Havana in December.

Rodando en La Habana: bicycle stories, a film from Cuban director Jaime Santos, explores the cultural meaning of bicycling and community in Havana. Dr. Hosek, who is cross-appointed to Film and Media Studies, served as associate director and research co-investigator on the film.

The first recipients of the Dean’s Admission Scholarship for the Arts were celebrated recently at a special event hosted by the Faculty of Arts and Science.

Susan Mumm, Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Science, speaks at the ceremony for the Dean’s Admission Scholarship for the Arts. 

A total of 188 students received the new scholarships for the 2015-16 academic year, which was open to all students in the Bachelor of Arts Honours Program with an average of 88.5-89.9 per cent.

John Smol receives the Martin Bergmann Medal for Excellence in Arctic Leadership and Science.

John Smol has received an Arctic research lifetime achievement award named in honour of his friend and former colleague Martin Bergmann.

“I knew and had worked with Marty for many years. He was a great guy who always ‘got things done,’ so receiving the Bergmann Medal is very close to me,” Dr. Smol says.

The pathway to a Queen’s degree is much improved for some B.C. college students.

Queen’s University and Langara College have signed a memorandum of understanding  aimed at supporting transfer student success and encouraging attainment of baccalaureate degrees. The agreement allows Langara students who have completed Associate of Arts or Associate of Science degrees to transfer into year three in Queen’s Faculty of Arts and Science.

New resources to help students with mental health accommodations at post-secondary schools across Ontario are now available with the completion of a large-scale collaborative project between researchers at Queen’s University and St. Lawrence College. 

The three-year project involved developing province-wide standards and guidelines to be used by students seeking academic accommodations for mental health. These resources for students, staff and faculty are now available online, and include:

Homecoming 2015 has come and gone and despite the cold, wet weather, thousands of alumni returned to Queen’s University for the weekend to foster friendships and create new connections.

From the many events hosted by the faculties and departments across the university to meeting up with acquaintances from the past, as well dear friends, Homecoming offers an opportunity for special memories.

At the September Faculty Board meeting, the School of Kinesiology and Health Studies asked the Dean of Arts and Science to consider the temporary suspension of admissions to the Physical Health and Education Program. Through the fall, the Dean has been reviewing the request and meeting with key stakeholders. She anticipates making her decision before 2016.

If you would like to provide feedback about the idea of a temporary suspension - please email the Dean directly at deanartsci@queensu.ca.

The 2015 edition of Queen’s annual Sustainability Week kicked off Monday, Oct. 19 with a tour of the Wolfe Island Wind Farm. Many more events are happening throughout the week, until Friday, Oct. 23, that highlight sustainability initiatives on campus and in the community.

Queen's University professor emeritus Arthur McDonald is the co-winner of the 2015 Nobel Prize in physics.

The announcement, made Tuesday morning by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, said Dr. McDonald won the award, along with Takaaki Kajita of the University of Tokyo, "for their key contributions to the experiments which demonstrated that neutrinos change identities."

Dr. McDonald received the call from the Nobel committee at 5 am adding that he immediately had a feeling of "tremendous accomplishment by our team."

Queen's University professor emeritus Arthur McDonald is the co-winner of the 2015 Nobel Prize in physics.

The announcement, made Tuesday morning by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, said Dr. McDonald won the award, along with Takaaki Kajita of the University of Tokyo, "for their key contributions to the experiments which demonstrated that neutrinos change identities."

Dr. McDonald received the call from the Nobel committee at 5 am adding that he immediately had a feeling of "tremendous accomplishment by our team."

Queen’s University regrets to inform the community of the death of Andrea Mariano, 18, from Thornhill, Ont. Ms. Mariano, a first-year student in the Faculty of Arts and Science, died at Kingston General Hospital on Sept. 18.

Andrea’s family has indicated that the cause of death was related to an anaphylactic allergic reaction.

“I would like to express my deepest condolences to Andrea’s family on behalf of the Queen’s community,” Principal Daniel Woolf says. “We are saddened by the loss of this promising young woman.”

Members of the Queen’s community have joined others across the region to assist families impacted by the ongoing humanitarian crisis in Syria.

Student Wellness Services, formerly Health, Counselling, and Disability

Duo honoured for their achievements in environmental science and public awareness.

Two Queen’s University professors are being recognized by the Royal Society of Canada (RSC) for their contributions to the environment and the public awareness of science.

For years, drama and music scholarship have been regarded as separate fields of study. Slowly, though, that’s changing, and Queen’s School of Music and the Department of Drama have come together to take advantage of that trend.

The School of Drama and Music officially came into existence on July 1 after years of planning. Queen’s Senate approved the merger in April.

Sociology professor David Lyon one of three finalists for national award. 

Queen’s University Sociology professor David Lyon, an international leader in Surveillance Studies, has been named one of three finalists for the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) Insight Award. These awards are amongst the highest achievements given annually by SSHRC. 

What makes humans attractive to other humans?

Queen’s University Professor Nikolaus Troje (Psychology, Biology, School of Computing) believes that it is the consistency of the whole appearance rather than the attractiveness of the parts.

“Most previous work on attractiveness focused on the effect of isolated features.” says Dr. Troje. “The current study demonstrates how important it is that these features fit together well.”

While they didn’t win the Microsoft Imagine Cup, Team Walkly is returning to Queen’s University having gained valuable experience that will help them reach the next level.

The Canadian representatives at the prestigious international event –  Riley Karson, (Cmp’17), Julie Lycklama (Cmp’17), Anastasiya Tarnouskaya (Cmp’17) and Christopher Thomas (Cmp’17) – created the Walkly app with the aim of providing a safer walking experience for everyone, anywhere, anytime by combining the power of social media and smartphone technology.

Although her domain of number theory is among the more abstract reaches of maths, Kevser Aktas, a post-doctoral fellow at Queen’s University, has innovated ways of reaching out to show people “the beauty of mathematics” at the same time as mobilizing the problem-solving skills at the heart of that beauty for an astonishing variety of aims.

The Queen’s University Biological Station (QUBS) welcomed almost a dozen Chinese students to its grounds north of Kingston last week for the 10th anniversary instalment of an innovative biology field course.

During her time at Queen’s University, Rebecca Love (Artsci’12) studied Kinesiology and Health Studies. She then spent two years working in health and education development in the Caribbean as a Pathy Family Foundation Fellow before continuing her Master’s studies at the University of Oxford.

Earlier this year, Ms. Love was awarded a prestigious Gates Cambridge Scholarship that will see her pursue a PhD in Medical Science at the University of Cambridge.

A Queen’s University researcher has received a top national award in the field of computer science.

Ahmed Hassan (Computing) recently received the Outstanding Young Computer Science Researcher Prize for 2014  from the Canadian Association of Computer Science. (University Communications)

Ahmed Hassan (Computing) is one of three recipients of the Outstanding Young Computer Science Researcher Prize for 2014 from the Canadian Association of Computer Science.

Queen’s Faculty of Arts and Science will begin offering its first online Bachelor of Science degree this fall – a three-year general BSc in Life Sciences.

“Queen’s has a long history of making education accessible to students who are studying at a distance, and we are delighted to be able to offer the university’s first fully online BSc degree in collaboration with the Faculty of Health Sciences,” says Brenda Ravenscroft, Associate Dean (Teaching and Learning) in the Faculty of Arts and Science.

John Smol honoured by Royal Canadian Geographical Society.

John Smol has spent over 30 years researching and exploring the circumpolar Arctic. He has given lectures on all seven continents. He has advanced climate research and influenced policies in many countries around the world.

Bailey Gerrits is working to rid the world of gender-based violence.


Queen’s University doctoral student Bailey Gerrits is one of 16 students across Canada to earn a Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation scholarship. The unique award has been presented annually since 2001 to the most talented doctoral students in Canada and abroad.

High up on the sixth floor of Botterell Hall, a glass flask is spinning in a bath of thick green liquid. Inside the flask is Professor Peter Davies’ (Biochemistry & Biology) attempt to solve one of nature’s riddles: how can plants, fish and insects live in sub-zero temperatures without freezing?

Peter Davies (left) is working with Craig Marshall from the University of Otago, New Zealand to improve the production of natural antifreeze proteins. 

Historical geographer and Professor Emeritus Brian Osborne has spent his life studying “place” and the “layers” of human presence that tell the story of people. He is fascinated by what connects people to the land, particularly at the local level, and he has published extensively on Kingston’s history and explored in depth the question of Canadian national identity.

The Disraeli Project, which produces scholarly editions of former British Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli’s correspondence, will close in November 2015.

Queen’s researcher works to debunk the theory behind massive stars.

Queen’s University PhD student Matt Shultz is researching magnetic, massive stars, and his research has uncovered questions concerning the behaviour of plasma within their magnetospheres.

Queen’s University graduates stack up favourably in the job market, according to surveys that track the employment outcomes of university graduates.

The 2013 Ontario University Graduate Survey (OUGS), conducted for Ontario’s Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities, shows that 92 per cent of graduates from Queen’s undergraduate programs are employed six months after graduation. That number compares to an average of 87 per cent for Ontario’s universities.

Adam Sage, the Head Gael and a fourth year Biochemistry student at Queen's shares his photo-blog below.

Year 1

Year 2

Kingston high school students are visiting Queen’s to talk about cancer.

Together with the Queen’s Cancer Research Institute (QCRI), Let’s Talk Science, and the Kingston branch of the Canadian Cancer Society’s Research Information Outreach Team (RIOT), students will spend the day learning about cancer biology and research.

Organizer Mathieu Crupi hopes the Let’s Talk Cancer symposium will inspire students to take an interest in cancer research.

Joining colleagues and conservationists from around the world, Dr. Stephen Lougheed (Biology and Environmental Studies) recently traveled to China to deliver public talks for Shanghai International Nature Conservation Week and the grand opening of the Shanghai Museum of Natural History.

Dr. Stephen Lougheed is also the Director of the Queen's University Biological Station. 

Presentation by:  Dr. David Gammon (Deputy Dean, Faculty of Sciences at the University of Cape Town)

When: Thursday, May 28, 10:30-12 Noon.

Where: Richardson Hall Room 340

Title: Forging an Extended Degree Programme in the Sciences at the University of Cape Town: Staff and Students in the Crucible

RSVP : Email  f2deans@queensu.ca  or call Caroline Teske  613-533-6000 x49584

The culmination of four years of study, creativity and hard work is on display this week as the graduating class from the Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) program hosts their annual year-end exhibition.

Begin Anywhere has transformed Ontario Hall into an art gallery featuring the work of 20 fourth-year students. There is an impressive range and depth to the artworks, from delicate fabrics and multi-layered print to paintings that take up an entire wall and a massive male form created out of layer upon layer of wood.

Students in Steven Maynard’s “History of Sexuality in Canada” (HIST 210) class are taking an in-depth look at Queen’s history of tackling sexual violence on campus.

At Queen’s, principals, deans, rectors, faculty, staff and students have all grappled with the topic of sexual assault for close to four decades and, in many cases, implemented preventative measures and responsive initiatives, which are highlighted in a display in the foyer of Kathleen Ryan Hall.

Students in Steven Maynard’s “History of Sexuality in Canada” (HIST 210) class are taking an in-depth look at Queen’s history of tackling sexual violence on campus.

At Queen’s, principals, deans, rectors, faculty, staff and students have all grappled with the topic of sexual assault for close to four decades and, in many cases, implemented preventative measures and responsive initiatives, which are highlighted in a display in the foyer of Kathleen Ryan Hall.

More than 400 students have graduated from Queen’ University’s Master in Art Conservation (MAC) program and founder Ian Hodkinson has proudly kept track of many of them. For 40 years, graduates of MAC - the only program like it in Canada - have gone on to important positions at museums all over the world.

“We have students in key museum positions all over,” says Mr. Hodkinson with a smile. “I’m just over the moon with how this program has turned out thanks largely to the talented colleagues who helped get it started and have improved it over the years.”

Queen’s students – in particular, English as a second language (ESL) and international students – now have access to expanded services as they work to develop their language and academic skills.

The Queen’s Learning Commons (QLC) Academic Skills Lab in Stauffer Library is a welcoming and flexible space that can accommodate small group discussions and one-on-one meetings with professional staff and trained peer assistants.

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What started out as a class project is now changing the way doctors issue exercise prescriptions.

Exercise-Rx is a computerized exercise prescription program developed by Erica Pascoal and Aaron Gazendam during their time in KNPE 463, an undergraduate course in the School of Kinesiology and Health Studies. The program was created in collaboration with the Queen’s-established Exercise is Medicine (EIM) initiative and is now used daily by the Loyalist Family Health Team in Amherstview.

It came as a surprise to renovators when, on a wintry day in Kingston, they uncovered a Mediterranean port hidden behind a false wall.

The Mediterranean port makes up the scene on a long-forgotten, 3.4 by 1.8 metre oil on canvas mural that had hung hidden behind the wall at 16 Bath Rd. for approximately 40 years. Queen’s students will have the opportunity to give the painting a new lease on life by the Springer Group of Companies, the property owner which has donated the mural to the Master of Art Conservation Program.

Along with Dr. Giacomin, Queen’s has two new Tier 2 CRCs and five renewals. Jordan Poppenk (Psychology) has been named the Tier 2 NSERC Chair in Cognitive Neuroimaging and Grégoire Webber (Law) is the new Tier 2 Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council Chair (SSHRC) in Public Law and Philosophy of Law.

Dr. Poppenk’s research focuses on bringing memories to life. Using emerging brain imaging methods, he observes how memories interact and links these interactions to participants’ brain anatomy.

The April 2015 exam schedule - dates and times- are posted.

Where do I find the schedule?

  • On your SOLUS main page, under the ‘Academics’ section, click on the ‘other academic…’ dropdown menu;
  • Click on the ‘Exam Schedule’ , then click on the ‘Go’ icon;
  • From this screen, you will be able to view your Exam Timetable listing any centrally scheduled exam sittings.

Before you write…

Emma Sawatzky (Artsci’15) had always wanted to study at the University of St. Andrews in Scotland. She was drawn to the school’s strong reputation for international relations and her Scottish grandparents had always told her about the country they’d emigrated from.

Emma Sawatzky hopes to pursue a graduate degree in international relations. 

“That’s really neat” was a common refrain overheard in the Biosciences Complex on April 1 as undergraduate and graduate students showcased their work at the annual Creative Computing: Art, Games, Research event hosted by Queen’s School of Computing.

The hands-on demonstrations, presentations and posters spanned a variety of topics including game design and technology, computing and the creative arts, human-computer interaction, and more.

Members of the Queen’s community are remembering first-year student Carley Allison, whose brave fight against throat cancer ended on March 31. She lived in Watts Hall on campus.

[Carley Allison]Carley Allison

Do tests only measure learning, or can they also promote learning? Should students review/practice the material they are trying to learn soon after they encounter the material or should they wait a while? During practice, should items of the same type/topic be grouped together or should they be interspersed among items of other types/topics? How we learn best may not correspond to how we think we learn best.

Students in the Faculty of Arts and Science will have the opportunity to get job experience before graduating with the creation of the Arts and Science Internship Program.

In 2014, Ontario’s government announced that it would establish a new collaborative Centre

Anglophiles, it’s time to warm up your vocal chords and unfurl your Union Jacks: the Queen’s School of Music is holding its first ‘proms’ concert at the Isabel and you’re invited.

A playful musical tribute to English music and culture, A Night at the Proms...Then Off to the Music Hall, will see students, faculty and alumni from the Queen’s School of Music taking on popular British tunes as part of a fundraising concert at the Isabel Bader Centre for the Performing Arts.

In collaboration with Residence Life, Student Academic Success Services (SASS) will be running Get It Done: The Long Day Against Procrastination, a day-long writing event for first-year students designed to help them combat procrastination around writing their final assignments.  The intention is for students to work on their writing projects in an informal, supportive environment facilitated by professionals and peers from the Writing Centre and Learning Strategies units.

This year's list of Agnes Benidickson Tricolour Award Recipients was announced.

Professor James Miller will hold an information session for the program on Wednesday, February 11 from 5:30-6:30pm in Kingston Hall 200. The program allows you to spend your fall term in Shanghai, taking courses in English that count towards a wide range of Queen's plans in the humanities and social sciences.

During the information session you will learn:

how the program will put you ahead of the curve;
how the custom features of this program make it different from other study abroad opportunities;

Queen’s University professor Peter Hodson has joined a new Royal Society of Canada panel that will study oil spills and their impacts on freshwater and marine environments.

Peter Hodson has been named to a new Royal Society of Canada panel dedicated to studying the impact of oil spills.

Queen’s University surveillance expert David Lyon will speak following the Kingston premiere of Citizenfour, a critically acclaimed documentary about Edward Snowden.

David Lyon is leading a discussion at The Screening Room Monday night following the screening of Citizenfour.

The search for dark matter continues in earnest at SNOLAB and the scientific team in Sudbury has a new research ally in Gilles Gerbier (Physics), the newest Canada Excellence Research Chair. In the four months since his arrival in Kingston, Dr. Gerbier has been busy setting up his home base at Queen’s and his lab two kilometres below the surface in the Vale Creighton mine.

With graduate school on the horizon, Emily Gong (Artsci’15) credits her participation in the Undergraduate Student Summer Research Fellowship (USSRF) program for expanding her options.

“Through the research fellowship, I became much more interested in exploring China’s ethnic diversity, a different area of study compared to what I had been doing during my previous three years of undergrad,” says Ms. Gong, a fine arts major. “The experience last summer gave me the resources and confidence to apply for master’s programs in Chinese studies.”

Queen’s University and the Faculty of Arts and Science have introduced a new Dean’s Admission Scholarship for incoming Bachelor of Arts students. The $1,500 to $2,000 first-year scholarship is available to students with an 88.5 to 89.9 high school average.

Students will be automatically considered for this award upon application.

The Department of French Studies is excited to announce the establishment of the Queen’s French Camp this summer on campus! Campers aged 5-9 will be attending the camp in July and August to participate in an array of French language and cultural activities.

We are looking for 4 counsellors for the months of July & August, an assistant camp director and a director who will be in Kingston for May to August. The contracts for the counsellors will be 9 weeks in July-August and the 2 others 16 weeks. Please specify your availability in your cover letter.

CYANOBACTERIAL HARMFUL algal blooms (CHABs) are increasing in severity on a worldwide basis. Combining nutrientsource control with post-bloom control is currently considered the best strategy for dealing with CHABs (1). However, huge investments in this strategy have proven ineffective in China, as demonstrated by yet another massive bloom last summer in Lake Tai despite over 100 billion RMB (more than US$16.25 billion) invested since 2007 (2).

Flags on campus are lowered in memory of James “Jim” Whitley, an emeritus professor in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics.

Dr. Whitley started teaching mathematics at Queen’s in September 1963. From 1966 to 1974, in addition to his teaching workload, he served as executive assistant to the dean of Arts and Science, and later, as assistant to Principal John Deutsch. Dr. Whitley was the 2001 recipient of the Alumni Award for Excellence in Teaching, given annually by the Queen’s University Alumni Association.