Department News

A recent collaborative research project between scientists from academia and government agencies has identified climate warming as the dominant driver of an increase in algal growth in the Athabasca oilsands region of northern Alberta.

Researchers used dated lake sediment cores to reconstruct past algal production and industrial impact at 23 remote, helicopter-accessed lakes in the oilsands region. Snowpack samples were also used to determine the nutrient deposition across the landscape.

The questions don’t get any bigger than the ones probed by faculty and students in Stirling Hall:

  • Where do we come from?
  • How did the universe evolve?
  • What is it made of?
  • And why, according to the laws of physics, does the world work the way it does?

Read more on Mauel and Chen in The ongoing neutrino puzzle

Elder Albert Marshall will be will be sharing about the Mi’kmaw principle of “Etuaptmumk” or “two-eyed seeing” and the process of “co-learning” that guided the Integrative Science Program (2001 – 2013) at CBU and concerning Mi’kmaw language, culture and wellness. This is Albert's first visit to Queen's University and a wonderful opportunity to hear from a Mi'kmaw knowledge keeper.

 

The Queen's School of Computing has unveiled the 2015-2016 Queen's School of Computing Newsletter.

Previous year editions can be found here.

Duo honoured for their achievements in environmental science and public awareness.

Two Queen’s University professors are being recognized by the Royal Society of Canada (RSC) for their contributions to the environment and the public awareness of science.

For years, drama and music scholarship have been regarded as separate fields of study. Slowly, though, that’s changing, and Queen’s School of Music and the Department of Drama have come together to take advantage of that trend.

The School of Drama and Music officially came into existence on July 1 after years of planning. Queen’s Senate approved the merger in April.

Sociology professor David Lyon one of three finalists for national award. 

Queen’s University Sociology professor David Lyon, an international leader in Surveillance Studies, has been named one of three finalists for the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) Insight Award. These awards are amongst the highest achievements given annually by SSHRC. 

What makes humans attractive to other humans?

Queen’s University Professor Nikolaus Troje (Psychology, Biology, School of Computing) believes that it is the consistency of the whole appearance rather than the attractiveness of the parts.

“Most previous work on attractiveness focused on the effect of isolated features.” says Dr. Troje. “The current study demonstrates how important it is that these features fit together well.”

While they didn’t win the Microsoft Imagine Cup, Team Walkly is returning to Queen’s University having gained valuable experience that will help them reach the next level.

The Canadian representatives at the prestigious international event –  Riley Karson, (Cmp’17), Julie Lycklama (Cmp’17), Anastasiya Tarnouskaya (Cmp’17) and Christopher Thomas (Cmp’17) – created the Walkly app with the aim of providing a safer walking experience for everyone, anywhere, anytime by combining the power of social media and smartphone technology.

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