Department News

Brandon Turner leans over his keyboard and with a few key strokes shows what he’s spent this summer working on. A digital rendering of an enormous vertebra fossil appears on his computer screen, followed by a chipped femur and then the hulking skull of a haudrosaur, the duck-billed dinosaur of the Cretaceous period.

Here’s what kids at play have always liked to do: Race, climb, wrestle, hang, throw, balance, fence with sticks, jump from heights and gravitate toward sharp objects. Ideally, while escaping the watchful eye of grown-ups.

Here’s what today’s kids hear when they’re even flirting with such pursuits: Slow down, get down, put that down. No throwing, no sticks allowed, don’t jump from there. Don’t touch, that’s too dangerous, be careful. And for goodness sake, don’t go anywhere without an adult.

Nigel Smith (Director, SNOLAB) discusses SNOLAB on CTV Northern Ontario.

Tomorrow the Canadian Real Estate Association will announce home sales volume and price data for July and Queen’s real estate expert John Andrew is available to comment on these numbers.

Deep-sea sharks wield some surprisingly well-adapted eyes that help them see in the dark, according to new research.

Transparent patches of skin above their eyes and a unique arrangement of light-sensitive cells on their retinas, among other things, allow five species of bioluminescent deep-sea shark to collect and focus as much light as possible to hunt prey and find each other in the gloomy depths.

Following Japan’s 2011 tsunami, Kiyoshi Kurokawa – chairman of the Fukushima Accident Independent Investigation Commission – described the Fukushima disaster as a “profoundly man-made disaster that could and should have been foreseen and prevented.” It is this mentality that motivated the Japanese government to enact some of the world’s most stringent building codes after the devastating 1995 earthquake in Kobe. In contrast, developing states in earthquake prone regions often lack the institutions and financing that are required to bolster natural disaster preparedness.

Middle East Professor Ariel Salzmann and activist Azeezah Kanji cite specific examples of how Canadian media has misrepresented the ongoing assault and how the Harper government aims to fuel this conflict to ensure high prices for Tar Sands oil.

Like many students, Sarah Hasnain has spent her summer on the water. However, this biology PhD candidate has devoted her time to academic rather than leisure pursuits.

Ms. Hasnain’s research on the response of zooplankton communities to the spiny water flea, an invasive species in the Muskoka Watershed, earned her the inaugural Muskoka Summit on the Environment Research Award earlier this summer. The $7,500 award supports a graduate student’s environmental research within Muskoka in fields related to environmental science, resource studies and/or policy.

Andrea Craig Queen's University Economics NewsAndrea Craig, a doctoral student in the Department of Economics at Queen’s, has been invited to attend the prestigious Lindau Meeting on Economic Sciences in Lindau, Germany.

 

Bill Nelson Department of Biology Queen's UniversityFollow the trail Bill Nelson’s research is blazing and you’ll end up in a room in the basement of the BioSciences Complex.

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