Department News

Queen’s and the Chinese Ministry of Land and Resources (MLR) renewed their two-decade-long relationship this week with the signing of a memorandum of understanding (MOU). Under the agreement, Queen’s will continue to provide training to Chinese officials and the MLR and its affiliates will continue to offer an internship program for Queen’s students.

A major dark matter project is making SNOLAB, located near Sudbury, its new home.

The underground science facility has been chosen to host the Super Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (SuperCDMS), an international, multimillion-dollar dark matter experiment currently based in Minnesota.

The SuperCDMS experiment was selected by U.S. funding agencies as one of its major second-generation dark matter projects, with support going toward expanding the science by building a more sensitive detector at SNOLAB.

Writing on behalf of 27 ethicists from across North America, Queen’s philosopher Udo Schuklenk and a team of five co-authors have written a commentary for the journal Nature on a controversial Facebook study.

Queen’s University researcher Ian Janssen (School of Kinesiology and Health Studies, Department of Public Health Sciences) has earned a place on Thomson Reuters’ Highly Cited Researchers list. He is the only Queen’s professor to make the list and one of only 88 researchers working in Canada on the 3,215 member list.

The international list includes scientists and researchers whose work is most often cited in other research papers.

Queen’s University has been a leading centre for education, research and outreach on urban and regional planning for almost 80 years, most recently through the School of Urban and Regional Planning (SURP), founded in 1970, and the Department of Geography, founded in 1960. As of July 1, 2014 SURP will join with the Department of Geography to form a new academic unit in the Faculty of Arts and Science.

Heather Aldersey and Norman Vorano have been appointed as the newest Queen’s National Scholars (QNS).

“The QNS program is a signature piece in the university’s commitment to ongoing faculty renewal, designed to attract early- or mid-career faculty who demonstrate exceptional promise as researchers and teachers,” says Principal Daniel Woolf. “Both Drs. Aldersey and Vorano are exceptional individuals who will bring compelling, interdisciplinary research programs to Queen’s in support of two growing fields.”

Forty performers will take to the stage in the Rotunda Theatre this week to share their experiences losing, growing, removing or flaunting their hair.

“We’re so glad that we are able to put on a production featuring some of Kingston’s most talented professional and community artists,” says Queen’s drama professor Kim Renders, the artistic co-ordinator of Hair Lines. “We have spoken word performances, movement pieces, and lecture-style talks all connected by music.”

Queen’s researchers are making new discoveries about Paul Kane’s paintings, an important collection of art for understanding 19th century Canada.  George Bevan (Classics) is using infrared light technology to peer underneath the oil of Kane’s paintings and see the original pencil drawings. Kane’s pencil drawings sketched in the field are the earliest depiction of 19th century Canadian and Aboriginal life. The artist took these sketches back to his Toronto studio in the 1850s and used oil paints to finish the artworks.

Krystle Maki believes her research into welfare surveillance in Ontario can make a difference in the world beyond the walls of academia.

“I have this vision of positive social change,” says Ms. Maki, a PhD candidate in the Department of Sociology. “There’s stigmatization on so many different fronts, and my research is intended to dismantle stereotypes. I also want to shed light on the labour conditions social assistance case workers often face and the single mothers within the system who are so often silenced.”

As an associate professor and director of the Queen’s Outreach Centre, Lynda Colgan is a woman who wears many hats. Not only does she work with Queen’s undergraduate and graduate students, but she also pursues her passion for teaching children and families about math.

It was this pursuit that ultimately earned Dr. Colgan the Partners in Research National Mathematics Ambassador Award. This honour recognizes the outstanding contribution for Canadians in the field of mathematics.

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