Department News

Forget heavy metal, they're talking light metal at Queen's University. Well, at least a light coating for metal anyway.

Queen's University chemistry professors Dr. Crudden and Dr. Horton teamed up two years ago to find a practical use for an organic to bond with metal.

Watch this video to learn more about how this discovery can be applied to everyday use.

According to a study by Queen’s researcher Christian Leuprecht, if the cost of policing in Canada is to become more sustainable there must be a discussion surrounding the extent of police service and how these are delivered.

A debate about the extent and delivery of police services must take place immediately, according to a study by Queen’s researcher Christina Leuprecht.

Queen’s University researchers Cathleen Crudden and Hugh Horton (Chemistry), along with students, postdoctoral fellows and other collaborators have developed a new process that allows organic compounds to bind to metal surfaces. This cutting-edge technology is now being patented and commercialized by PARTEQ and Green Centre Canada.

Feminist Legal Studies Queen’s (FLSQ) is hosting “Arctic/Northern Women: Situating Law and Justice in Development and Equality,” a ground-breaking, interdisciplinary, and multinational conference on Feb. 28 and March 1 that will bring to campus experts in Indigenous, northern, and Arctic issues from Finland, Sweden, Norway, the U.S. and Canada.

Researchers, law practitioners, representatives of non-profits, and policy advocates will examine how their fast-evolving and intersecting fields are shaping contemporary Arctic/northern and Indigenous politics.

Julia Marsala (Artsci’14) is from a small farm town in Pennsylvania, so when she stepped into the megalopolis of Shanghai, with its more than 23 million people, she felt a little overstimulated, a little overwhelmed.

 “The sheer number of people on the streets – it was nothing I’d ever seen. It was culture shock, but not in a bad way,” she says. “The city and China in general forces you out of your comfort zone, and when you do that, you learn a lot about yourself.”

Queen’s University scientist Dr. John P. Smol goes deep below the surface of our lakes and rivers to uncover the secrets of our environmental history, written in mud and silt. His collaborator and half-brother, Dr. Jules Blais, is a University of Ottawa environmental toxicologist who studies the effects of industrial pollutants on ecological systems. Dr. Blais’ toxicological work helps define past environmental stressors, while Dr. Smol’s ecological work characterizes the ecosystem responses to these stressors.

Mike Rose (Artsci'79) and Susan Riddell Rose (Sc’86) were awarded the Queen’s University Alumni Association’s Johnson Award, the highest honour bestowed by the association’s Calgary Branch. Principal Daniel Woolf, who was on hand to present the award at a recent ceremony in Calgary, spoke about the couple’s dedication to Queen’s and the Calgary community.

Ofyn Veg: A Symposium on Canadian Jewish Studies in Honour of Gerald Tulchinsky will be held next month at the University of Toronto's Centre for Jewish Studies. Dr. Tulchinsky is a Queen's professor emeritus of history and a leading scholar in the area of Jewish studies in Canada.

The Yiddish phrase Ofyn Veg, which means “on the road,” is a fitting way to describe Dr. Tulchinsky’s exploration and scholarship into the Jewish experience in Canada.

PSYC 100 has been redesigned.  The new PSYC 100 brings students together two hours per week instead of three; one hour for a lecture and one hour to work though activities in small tutorial groups.

In recent years, we have become concerned about the level of student engagement in PSYC 100. Student engagement is the result of active and collaborative learning, something that is hard to achieve in a large introductory course such as the Principles of Psychology with its 450-700 students per section!

Choose from among more than a dozen musical events taking place on campus in November and December.

School of Music Calendar...

Pages