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Duo honoured for their achievements in environmental science and public awareness.

Two Queen’s University professors are being recognized by the Royal Society of Canada (RSC) for their contributions to the environment and the public awareness of science.

What makes humans attractive to other humans?

Queen’s University Professor Nikolaus Troje (Psychology, Biology, School of Computing) believes that it is the consistency of the whole appearance rather than the attractiveness of the parts.

“Most previous work on attractiveness focused on the effect of isolated features.” says Dr. Troje. “The current study demonstrates how important it is that these features fit together well.”

The Queen’s University Biological Station (QUBS) welcomed almost a dozen Chinese students to its grounds north of Kingston last week for the 10th anniversary instalment of an innovative biology field course.

John Smol honoured by Royal Canadian Geographical Society.

John Smol has spent over 30 years researching and exploring the circumpolar Arctic. He has given lectures on all seven continents. He has advanced climate research and influenced policies in many countries around the world.

Adam Sage, the Head Gael and a fourth year Biochemistry student at Queen's shares his photo-blog below.

Year 1

Year 2

Kingston high school students are visiting Queen’s to talk about cancer.

Together with the Queen’s Cancer Research Institute (QCRI), Let’s Talk Science, and the Kingston branch of the Canadian Cancer Society’s Research Information Outreach Team (RIOT), students will spend the day learning about cancer biology and research.

Organizer Mathieu Crupi hopes the Let’s Talk Cancer symposium will inspire students to take an interest in cancer research.

Joining colleagues and conservationists from around the world, Dr. Stephen Lougheed (Biology and Environmental Studies) recently traveled to China to deliver public talks for Shanghai International Nature Conservation Week and the grand opening of the Shanghai Museum of Natural History.

Dr. Stephen Lougheed is also the Director of the Queen's University Biological Station. 

Queen’s University professor Peter Hodson has joined a new Royal Society of Canada panel that will study oil spills and their impacts on freshwater and marine environments.

Peter Hodson has been named to a new Royal Society of Canada panel dedicated to studying the impact of oil spills.

CYANOBACTERIAL HARMFUL algal blooms (CHABs) are increasing in severity on a worldwide basis. Combining nutrientsource control with post-bloom control is currently considered the best strategy for dealing with CHABs (1). However, huge investments in this strategy have proven ineffective in China, as demonstrated by yet another massive bloom last summer in Lake Tai despite over 100 billion RMB (more than US$16.25 billion) invested since 2007 (2).

Sophie Kiwala, M.P.P. for Kingston and the Islands would like to invite all Queen's students to join her for the announcement of the re-introduction of the Invasive Species Act on Friday, November 7th at 11:30am in Room 3110 of Queen's Bioscience Complex, 116 Barrie Street.

Invasive species such as zebra mussels and phragmites cost the province tens of millions of dollars a year. Others not yet in Ontario, such as Asian carp and the mountain pine beetle, are serious ecological and economic threats.

Deep-sea sharks wield some surprisingly well-adapted eyes that help them see in the dark, according to new research.

Transparent patches of skin above their eyes and a unique arrangement of light-sensitive cells on their retinas, among other things, allow five species of bioluminescent deep-sea shark to collect and focus as much light as possible to hunt prey and find each other in the gloomy depths.

Like many students, Sarah Hasnain has spent her summer on the water. However, this biology PhD candidate has devoted her time to academic rather than leisure pursuits.

Ms. Hasnain’s research on the response of zooplankton communities to the spiny water flea, an invasive species in the Muskoka Watershed, earned her the inaugural Muskoka Summit on the Environment Research Award earlier this summer. The $7,500 award supports a graduate student’s environmental research within Muskoka in fields related to environmental science, resource studies and/or policy.

Bill Nelson Department of Biology Queen's UniversityFollow the trail Bill Nelson’s research is blazing and you’ll end up in a room in the basement of the BioSciences Complex.

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