Languages, Literatures and Cultures

The Canada Council has announced today the 2017 winners of the Canada Council Molson Prize in the Arts and Sciences as well as the John G. Diefenbaker Prize.  Please follow the links below to see more on our website.

Following an already busy year filled with launching new initiatives, an additional two new plans are being introduced by the Faculty of Arts and Science for the 2017-18 academic year, just in time for plan selection for first-year students. The two new plans are a Politics-Philosophy-Economics Specialization and a major in Languages, Literatures and Cultures.

Politics-Philosophy-Economics Specialization

Elder Albert Marshall will be will be sharing about the Mi’kmaw principle of “Etuaptmumk” or “two-eyed seeing” and the process of “co-learning” that guided the Integrative Science Program (2001 – 2013) at CBU and concerning Mi’kmaw language, culture and wellness. This is Albert's first visit to Queen's University and a wonderful opportunity to hear from a Mi'kmaw knowledge keeper.

A documentary worked on by Jennifer Ruth Hosek (Languages, Literatures, and Cultures) will premiere at the prestigious International Festival of New Latin American Cinema in Havana in December.

Rodando en La Habana: bicycle stories, a film from Cuban director Jaime Santos, explores the cultural meaning of bicycling and community in Havana. Dr. Hosek, who is cross-appointed to Film and Media Studies, served as associate director and research co-investigator on the film.

 

Professor James Miller will hold an information session for the program on Wednesday, February 11 from 5:30-6:30pm in Kingston Hall 200. The program allows you to spend your fall term in Shanghai, taking courses in English that count towards a wide range of Queen's plans in the humanities and social sciences.

During the information session you will learn:

how the program will put you ahead of the curve;
how the custom features of this program make it different from other study abroad opportunities;

With graduate school on the horizon, Emily Gong (Artsci’15) credits her participation in the Undergraduate Student Summer Research Fellowship (USSRF) program for expanding her options.

“Through the research fellowship, I became much more interested in exploring China’s ethnic diversity, a different area of study compared to what I had been doing during my previous three years of undergrad,” says Ms. Gong, a fine arts major. “The experience last summer gave me the resources and confidence to apply for master’s programs in Chinese studies.”

Julia Marsala (Artsci’14) is from a small farm town in Pennsylvania, so when she stepped into the megalopolis of Shanghai, with its more than 23 million people, she felt a little overstimulated, a little overwhelmed.

 “The sheer number of people on the streets – it was nothing I’d ever seen. It was culture shock, but not in a bad way,” she says. “The city and China in general forces you out of your comfort zone, and when you do that, you learn a lot about yourself.”