Physics and Astronomy

Queen’s is celebrating the groundbreaking work of the university’s researchers and to help promote the achievements a series of banners are being placed on prominent buildings around campus as well as on light poles along University Avenue and downtown Kingston.

Queen’s professor James Fraser (Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy) has received the prestigious 3M National Teaching Fellowship from the Society for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education (STLHE). Dr. Fraser is the eighth Queen’s professor to be made a 3M Fellow, with the most recent being John Smol (Biology) in 2009.

Congratulations to undergraduate Physics Student, Simon Axelrod, who placed first in the country in the 2016 Canadian Association of Physicists University Prize Exam! Simon is awarded the Lloyd G. Elliott Prize, which entails a cash award of $500 and a trip to the CAP Congress this summer.

Check out the Physics website for more information

Two members of the Queen’s community were among those recognized by Governor General David Johnston during the Order of Canada investiture ceremony at Rideau Hall in Ottawa on Friday, May 13.

Arthur McDonald (Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy), winner of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics, was promoted to Companion of the Order of Canada while Ruth Wilson (Family Medicine) was named Member of the Order of Canada.

Peer-Assisted Learning Workshop with Dr. James Fraser, Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Queen’s University

Date: Wednesday, April 6, 1:30-3:00 pm

Location: Ellis Hall, Room 319

The questions don’t get any bigger than the ones probed by faculty and students in Stirling Hall:

  • Where do we come from?
  • How did the universe evolve?
  • What is it made of?
  • And why, according to the laws of physics, does the world work the way it does?

Read more on Mauel and Chen in The ongoing neutrino puzzle

With the Nobel Prize ceremony just a week away, Queen’s University took time to honour Professor Emeritus Arthur McDonald (Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy) on Thursday with a special send-off event.

Hundreds of well-wishers filled Grant Hall to mark Dr. McDonald being awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics, along with Takaaki Kajita of the University of Tokyo, “for their key contributions to the experiments which demonstrated that neutrinos change identities.” The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences made the announcement on Oct. 6.

Queen's University professor emeritus Arthur McDonald is the co-winner of the 2015 Nobel Prize in physics.

The announcement, made Tuesday morning by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, said Dr. McDonald won the award, along with Takaaki Kajita of the University of Tokyo, "for their key contributions to the experiments which demonstrated that neutrinos change identities."

Dr. McDonald received the call from the Nobel committee at 5 am adding that he immediately had a feeling of "tremendous accomplishment by our team."

Queen's University professor emeritus Arthur McDonald is the co-winner of the 2015 Nobel Prize in physics.

The announcement, made Tuesday morning by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, said Dr. McDonald won the award, along with Takaaki Kajita of the University of Tokyo, "for their key contributions to the experiments which demonstrated that neutrinos change identities."

Dr. McDonald received the call from the Nobel committee at 5 am adding that he immediately had a feeling of "tremendous accomplishment by our team."

Queen’s researcher works to debunk the theory behind massive stars.

Queen’s University PhD student Matt Shultz is researching magnetic, massive stars, and his research has uncovered questions concerning the behaviour of plasma within their magnetospheres.

The search for dark matter continues in earnest at SNOLAB and the scientific team in Sudbury has a new research ally in Gilles Gerbier (Physics), the newest Canada Excellence Research Chair. In the four months since his arrival in Kingston, Dr. Gerbier has been busy setting up his home base at Queen’s and his lab two kilometres below the surface in the Vale Creighton mine.

The Fall 2014 Cave Memorial Lecture in Physics presents the Accelerating Universe

Nigel Smith (Director, SNOLAB) discusses SNOLAB on CTV Northern Ontario.

A major dark matter project is making SNOLAB, located near Sudbury, its new home.

The underground science facility has been chosen to host the Super Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (SuperCDMS), an international, multimillion-dollar dark matter experiment currently based in Minnesota.

The SuperCDMS experiment was selected by U.S. funding agencies as one of its major second-generation dark matter projects, with support going toward expanding the science by building a more sensitive detector at SNOLAB.