Global Indigenous Histories

HIST 207/3.0

A survey of various historical case studies that will explore the causes, conflicts, and consequences that have occurred wherever indigenous peoples have encountered colonizing invaders. Significant questions will include who is indigenous?, who is not?, and can one speak of a global indigenous history?

Description

Today indigenous issues, problems, and assertions comprise one of the globe’s most intractable, pained, and political conversations. Modern indigenous groups press, both individually and collectively, for rights to land, water, resources, political sovereignty, treaty rights, government recognition, and various forms of autonomy. Of course, the indigenous present bears witness to long histories of colonialism and post-colonialism, typically beginning with the Age of European Exploration (15th to 19th Centuries), which could also be counted as the Age of European Invasion, but not limited exclusively to the European past.

The course will seek to draw together modern indigenous issues with relevant historical case studies and new methodological approaches to the subject. At its most basic level, the course will force students to grapple with the idea of indigeneity, how we define it, how it works, and how it might be interrogated. As well, the course will seek to explore cases outside of the conventional narrative of European expansion to explore the Roman invasion of Gaul and the Han occupation of Taiwan, to name two such cases identified below.

Online Blackboard Collaborate tutorials, Moodle chats, and a large summative role-playing exercise will ensure that active learning is a substantial component of the overall student experience in the course. Students’ participation in such activities will be underwritten by deep immersion in the assigned readings and pointed engagement with each unit’s learning objectives. As well, students will have two written assignments, a conventional short research paper and a short critical essay. A final exam will provide a summative test of students’ encounters with the subject matter, the readings, and each other as engaged through the interactive activities.

Evaluation

Online tutorials (using Blackboard Collaborate), Moodle chats, and a large summative role-playing exercise will ensure that active learning is a substantial component of the overall student experience in the course. Students’ participation in such activities will be underwritten by deep immersion in the assigned readings and pointed engagement with each unit’s learning objectives. As well, students will have two written assignments, a conventional short research paper and a short critical essay. A final exam will provide a summative test of students’ encounters with the subject matter, the readings, and each other as engaged through the interactive activities.

Online Tutorial 110%
Online Tutorial 210%
Moodle Chat 15%
Moodle Chat 25%
Research Paper15%
Critical Review Paper15%
Role-play Exercise20%
Final Exam20%

Topics

Course Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course students will be able to:

  1. Acquire general knowledge about theoretical issues involving concepts of indigeneity and specific knowledge about certain specific case studies
  2. Demonstrate understanding of the idea of indigeneity and how the concept has changed over time
  3. Apply knowledge gained in the course to other courses and to one’s engagement with the world
  4. Develop critical thoughts and comparisons with various definitions of indigeneity as well as historical case studies
  5. Synthesize competing definitions of and claims to indigeneity
  6. Assess whether or not one can speak of global indigeneity

Course Topics

  • Context
  • Christopher Columbus
  • Taiwan
  • Gaul and Rome
  • Sudan
  • New Zealand
  • Conclusion

Instructor

Portrait of course instructor Dr. James CarsonProf. James Carson specializes in the history of Native North America and is particularly interested in questions of cultural change and persistence. But North America is only one small piece of a bigger puzzle, and so Prof. Carson has developed this course to develop comparative perspectives on indigenous issues and to explore more closely connections between past, present, and future in order to develop a fuller understanding of the global situation.

Time Commitment

To complete the readings, assignments, and course activities, students can expect to spend, on average, about 10-12 hours per week on the course.

Course Resources

About SOLUS

SOLUS is Queen’s Student On-Line University System. You’ll have access to a SOLUS account once you become a Queen’s student. You’ll use SOLUS to register for courses, add and drop courses, update your contact information, view financial and academic information, and pay your tuition.

About MOODLE

Moodle is Queen's online learning platform. You'll log into Moodle to access your course. All materials related to your course—notes, readings, videos, recordings, discussion forums, assignments, quizzes, groupwork, tutorials, and help—will be on the Moodle site.

About Credit Units

Queen’s courses are weighted in credit units. A typical one-term course is worth 3.0 units, and a typical two-term course is worth 6.0 units. You combine these units to create your degree. A general (three-year) BA requires a total of 90 credit units.

Computer Requirements

To take an online course, you’ll need a good-quality computer (Windows XP/Vista/7, Pentium III, or Mac OS X 10.5, G4 or G5 processor, 256 MB RAM) with a high-speed internet connection, soundcard, speakers, and microphone, and up-to-date versions of free software (Explorer/Firefox, Java, Flash, Adobe Reader). See also Preparing For Your Course.

Dates/Deadlines

The deadlines for new applications to Queen’s Arts and Science Online courses are in our Dates and Deadlines section.

Tuition Fees

Tuition fees vary depending when you start, your year, faculty, and program. Fees for 2014-15 first-year Distance Career Arts & Science Canadian students are as follows: for a 3.0-unit course, $605.31; for a 6.0-unit course, $1210.62. See also Tuition and Payment.

Grading Scheme

The information below is intended for undergraduate students in the Faculty of Arts and Science. Academic Regulations in other Faculties may differ.

Letter Grade Grade Point
A+4.30
A4.00
A-3.70
B+3.30
B3.00
B-2.70
C+2.30
C2.00
C-1.70
D+1.30
D1.00
D-0.70
F0.00

GPA Calculators
Have your SOLUS grade report handy and then follow the link to the Arts and Science GPA calculators.

How does this affect my academics?
See the GPA and Academic Standing page.

Follow the link above for an explanation of how the GPA system affects such things as the Dean’s Honour List, requirements to graduate, and academic progression.

Frequently Asked Questions on the Grading Scheme
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Campus Bookstore

All textbooks can be purchased at Queen’s Campus Bookstore.

Non-Queen’s Students

All Queen’s Arts and Science Online courses are open to students at other universities. Before applying as a visiting student, request a Letter of Permission from your home university that states that you have permission to take the course and apply it to your degree. See also Apply.

Academic Integrity

Please see Queen’s policy statement on academic integrity for information on how to complete an online course honestly.