Bader International Study Centre

Queen's University
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BISC

at Herstmonceux Castle, U.K.

The BADER INTERNATIONAL

STUDY CENTRE

at Herstmonceux Castle, U.K.

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Experiential Learning

A photograph of students on a field study

Experiential Learning is an essential and integrated element of the Bader International Study Centre’s programs. It serves to transform academic knowledge into the skills that students will use every day as leaders in their respective fields. As such, Experiential Learning Opportunities (ELOs) are a key feature of the BISC academic experience and are a part of every course that we offer. ELOs can include any number of academic pursuits outside the classroom environment, such as engaging in discussion with visiting speakers, attending networking events, and engaging in problem-based learning activities. 

The combination of classroom discussion and activities outside the classroom reflects the BISC’s emphasis on anchoring the academic experience in direct observation and participation. Students benefit from a high level of inquiry – as any university graduate student would expect – and our ELOs combine self-learning with guided research on primary source materials of all kinds. This provides a stimulating way to learn more about your course material, and an unmatched opportunity to absorb first-hand, the extraordinary riches of our world and its people.

A photograph of students on a field study

Our Experiential Learning Opportunities are course-specific, with your professors planning all off-site lectures. These will add considerable depth and variety to your learning experience. Students studying music for example, may critique La Traviata at the National Opera in London. Politics students may find themselves experiencing government first hand by interviewing Westminster Parliamentarians. Those studying International Relations visit the International Maritime Organization HQ in London to evaluate how marine safety standards continue to facilitate world trade over a hundred years after the Titanic disaster. There is no better way to learn than to experience first-hand!

Recent Experiential Learning Opportunities have included:

  • Debating Scottish independence with a Scottish Member of Parliament in Edinburgh.
  • Exploring Canterbury Cathedral, home of the Anglican Church and seat of the Archbishop of Canterbury, applying acquireknowledge in practical analysis.
  • Co-operatively constructing digital maps of the city of Brighton’s various cultures and sub-cultures.
  • Speaking with the creators of the Brighton Earthship—an award-winning ecologically-friendly structure designed to get all the electricity and drinking water it needs from the sun and rain.
  • Engaging in political debate with other undergraduates at the London School of Economics.
  • Attending Art History lectures at the Louvre in Paris, directly in front of the works being discussed.

The number of course-specific Experiential Learning Opportunities varies from term to term, from course to course, and from discipline to discipline. These are chosen based on the needs of the courses, and are integrated directly into course curricula.