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Upper Year Courses
LAW-532 Aboriginal Law  
This course examines the legal and constitutional rights of Aboriginal peoples in Canada. It considers the legal legacy of Canada’s colonial past – the implications, that is, for the present constitutional order of European settlement in territories that were occupied and governed by indigenous peoples. Much of the course focuses upon the interpretation of section 35 of the Constitution Act, 1982, which entrenches ‘existing aboriginal and treaty rights’. Particular attention will therefore be given to Aboriginal rights to lands, natural resources, and self-government, as well as the identification and interpretation of Aboriginal treaty rights. In the course of addressing these topics, we will confront constitutional issues relating to federalism and human rights, theoretical issues relating to legal interpretation in a cross-cultural setting, comparisons with indigenous rights in other former colonies, and the status of indigenous peoples and rights under international law. The general purpose of the course, then, is to examine the possibilities and challenges associated with Canada’s multi-national and legally-pluralist constitutional order from a variety of legal, cultural, and theoretical perspectives.
3 credits, winter term
Professor Walters
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LAW-684 Accounting for Lawyers
This course introduces the main accounting principles and practices, including a discussion of generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) and the relationship of these principles to tax law.   The course also explores financial statements such as balance sheets and income statements as well as the importance of maintaining integrity in financial reporting.
2 credits, fall term
Professor Cockfield
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LAW-427 Administrative Law  
The primary focus of the course will be on the relationship between the courts and the executive and administrative branches of government; and on the role of judicial review of administrative action in the Canadian constitutional and governmental framework. In this context, the course will examine in detail the major bases for judicial review of administrative action - ultra vires action, jurisdictional error, abuse of discretion, error of law and procedural unfairness. As well, the various remedies, both common law and statutory, for unlawful administrative action will be considered. It is also the intention that, from the cases and other materials studied, the student will develop a better understanding of the executive and administrative processes and will appreciate some of the design or structural problems in creating a system of public interest decision-making which is efficient and effective and which recognizes and gives scope for valued individual interests and concerns.
4 credits, one term
Professor Corbett, fall term; Professor Walters, winter term
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LAW-529 Advanced Constitutional Law (Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms)  
The course consists of a series of seminars on recent developments, practical considerations, and cutting edge issues in Constitutional Law. In addition to participating in the weekly seminars, students must either write a paper on an approved topic or participate in a moot. The mooting option provides students with a very practical advocacy experience on a challenging, fact sensitive problem in Constitutional Law. The moot court hearings are presided over by well-known justices. 
3 credits, fall term
Mr. Stratas
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LAW-608 Advanced Corporate Law  
The purpose of the course is to examine in detail the principal legal issues and considerations involved in a variety of key transactions and other events that typically arise for a substantial private or public corporation. The topics to be considered include: share attributes and other 'corporate governance' matters affecting the organization of more complicated corporate entities, debt financings (including the preparation and negotiation of loan agreements and dealings with financial institutions generally), insolvencies and restructurings, amalgamations, reorganizations and other 'fundamental changes' and various aspects of corporate acquisitions. Emphasis would also be placed upon the role and responsibilities of lawyers involved in corporate organizations and transactions, taking into account potential ethical and conflict of interest considerations, and practices that a lawyer may or should adopt to reflect these considerations and to best serve the client's interests.
3 credits, winter term
Mr. Basra, Mr. Rein
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LAW-331 Advanced Evidence
This seminar will meet once per week for focused discussions of particular issues in evidence law including: logic and its role in determining relevance and the sufficiency of inferences, hearsay after Khelawon, vulnerable hearsay exceptions, the future of implied hearsay and the American approach, police officers and their notes, the FRE and codification, the future of ss. 9, 10 and 11 of the Canada Evidence Act, the future of spousal incompetence rules, public interest immunity post 9/11, etc.
3 credits, fall term
Professor Manson
PREREQUISITE LAW-320 Evidence
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LAW-566 Advanced Labour Law
This seminar course will take a comparative approach to evaluating key elements of Canadian labour law from both a legal and a policy perspective. It will focus on identifying and assessing the underlying goals of labour legislation, and evaluating whether the existing law meets these objectives. Topics such as systems for acquisition and termination of collective representation of employees, regulation of unfair labour practices, collective bargaining schemes, the scope of individual rights within a collective bargaining regime, and the role of constitutional rights in the labour context will be examined.
3 credits, winter term
Mr. Rootham
PREREQUISITE LAW-560 Labour Law or permission of the instructor.
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LAW-321 Advanced Legal Research  
The Advanced Legal Research Course prepares students to research the law by introducing them to the basics of legal research in their own and in other relevant jurisdictions.  Students will study the courts and law making in Canada, the U.S., the U.K., and Europe as well as in an international context.  They will learn how primary sources from various jurisdiction come into being, how they are organized, and where they can be found. They will also learn about 1) secondary sources in law available in print and electronically, 2) sources in the humanities and social sciences including Statistics Canada information, and 3) the major legal databases in Canada. 
3 credits, one term
Professor McCormack
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LAW-685 Advanced Patents
This advanced course in Patent Law begins with a review of the historical basis for the patent laws, and the modern requirements and rationale for patent protection in Canada and abroad.  Next, the patent document is scrutinized, and the laws relating to its construction are reviewed.  Against this backdrop, international treaties and the patent regimes of “major patent” countries are compared.  The course concludes with a consideration of the interplay between the patent laws and other intellectual property laws and regulatory regimes.  Special consideration is given to pharmaceutical patents.
2 credits, winter term
Mr. Zischka
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LAW-339 Advanced Torts
This seminar will provide students with the opportunity to explore tort law in greater depth. There will be in-class discussion of topics that provoke public debate or involve timely public issues. Such topics may include (but are not restricted to) the development and analysis of liability law within intentional torts, negligence and strict liability; injuries to business relationships and family relationships. There will be in-depth analysis of recoverable damages and techniques in proving damages. Students will generate research on a selection of current legal problems: such as medical malpractice, professional negligence, products liability, premises liability, business torts, information age torts, comparative torts, tort reform and the future of tort law. 
3 credits, fall term
Professor King
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LAW-341/342 Alternative Dispute Resolution  
The resolution of legal disputes by means of negotiation, mediation, or arbitration, rather than by trial before a judge. Both court-annexed and private ADR methods will be considered. The class will participate in simulation exercises, some of which will involve preparation of settlement documents, and will examine the relevant statutes and current studies on alternative dispute resolution. The primary focus will be on the use of ADR in private civil disputes, particularly in the areas of commercial law, torts, and family law. The goal of the course is the development of both settlement skills and a critical understanding of ADR methods.
3 credits, one term
Ms. Crush, Ms. Gauci, fall term; Mr. Morris, winter term
Note: Students cannot enrol in more than one of either LAW-341/342 Alternative Dispute Resolution, LAW-337 Client Counselling and Dispute Resolution, or LAW-335 Negotiation as there are subject areas common to both.
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LAW-350/351 Appellate Advocacy-Moots
This course provides an introduction to oral advocacy and preparation of factums. Students will prepare facta and oral argument in teams of four, and argue their case in a moot at the conclusion of the course. Note: there is some variation in the specific matters dealt with amongst the sections of this course; individual descriptions for each section are posted at http://law.queensu.ca/students/llbProgram/2007-08upperYearProgram/courseDescriptions2007-08.pdf
3 credits, one term
Mr. Osanic, Ms. Whaley, Ms. Yach, fall term; Mr. Burstein, Mr. Hutchison, winter term
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LAW-606 Bankruptcy Law
This course examines the law dealing with the bankruptcy process in Canada, including the public policies advanced by the bankruptcy process, preferences and debtor rehabilitation.  Within the context of different kinds of debts, it will review the remedies available to secured and unsecured creditors and the rights and obligations of creditors and debtors under the Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act.  (Note:  There is substantial interplay between the federal Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act and the provincial Personal Property Security Act.  This course focuses on the former, not the latter, legislation.) The course will address the determinations of priorities among creditors and restrictions on the discharge of certain categories of debt in bankruptcy.  A substantial part of the course will deal with restructuring insolvent businesses using proposals under the Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act or plans of arrangement under the Companies Creditors Arrangement Act, with a critical examination of the discretionary role of the courts in such proceedings.
3 credits, winter term
Mr. Jones
PREREQUISITE LAW-440 Business Associations.
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LAW-440 Business Associations  
The course is a study of the establishment and operation of business organizations, including partnerships and closely and widely-held corporations. The nature of capital and corporate securities, and the formation of companies including the transfer of a business, will be considered. The consequences of carrying on business in the corporate form, including the liability of a corporation for the conduct of its agents and controllers will be examined. A major portion of the course will be taken up by a consideration of the powers, duties and liabilities of directors, officers and controlling shareholders, corporate responsibility and the rights of minority shareholders and other stakeholders, and the remedies of dissenters in a corporation.
4 credits, one term
Professor Paton, fall term; Professor Flanagan, winter term
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LAW-519 Children's Law
The course deals with a number of related issues concerning the treatment of children and adolescents in the legal system. Tactical, ethical and policy questions are addressed, as well as substantive and procedural legal topics. We will also explore the role of lawyers in a variety of proceedings affecting children and adolescents. While the primary focus of the course is legal and process oriented, the legal issues must be seen in a multi-disciplinary context, as is reflected in the reading materials and the range of professionals who will visit the class as speakers. Lawyers, judges, social workers, probation officers, youth workers and others will be guest speakers. The major topics in the course are: (1) child welfare, including child abuse and neglect, focussing primarily on child protection proceedings, but also considering criminal law issues, such as those relating to child witnesses and corporal punishment; (2) adoption; (3) youth justice issues.
Although all social and economic classes are affected by the issues raised in this course, many of the issues studied in this course tend to disproportionately affect those who are socially or economically disadvantaged in society, and, for example, issues of aboriginal status arise in each section of the course.
This course may be of particular relevance to students with an interest in Criminal or Family Law, although some students take this course out of general interest. Many of the topics discussed are matters of considerable public controversy. 
3 credits, winter term
Professor Bala
PREREQUISITE OR COREQUISITE LAW-520 Family Law or permission of the instructor.
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LAW-418 Clinical Correctional Law  
Correctional Law is a specialized branch of administrative law dealing with administrative law principles and remedies in the context of the prison system. Students who enrol in this clinical course become student members of the Correctional Law Project. The Project is a specialized legal clinic that provides legal advice, assistance and representation to prisoners in federal penitentiaries in the Kingston area.
This clinical course provides students with the opportunity to develop essential lawyering skills by becoming involved in the legal practice carried on by the Correctional Law Project. Students will interview prisoner clients and witnesses. Students will represent prisoner clients at trials in Penitentiary Disciplinary courts and at hearings before the National Parole Board. Students will prepare facta for inmate appeals against conviction and sentence to the Court of Appeal for Ontario. Students will also be involved in providing legal advice and assistance to prisoner clients on a variety of other matters. Through the experience of involvement in the Project's legal practice, students will have many opportunities to develop skill in advocacy, in interviewing clients and witnesses, in legal research, analysis and drafting and in establishing and managing effective solicitor/client relationships. 
Instruction is provided through lectures and seminars and through individual supervision of student casework by the Project lawyers.
4 credits per term, two terms
Professor Mandell
PREREQUISITE Completion of all first year LL.B. courses.
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LAW-521 Clinical Family Law  
Students in this course are placed with a range of professionals in the family and children’s law field. Most of the placements will require the students to do some research, but the primary focus is on learning from observation and reflection. There is no scheduled class time, but there will be several meetings of the entire class arranged at times that do not conflict with any student’s schedule. Students are required to keep a course log and write a short reflective piece. The placements include: Children’s Aid Society, Family Court Duty Counsel, Frontenac Youth Diversion, Victim Witness Program and Family Law Lawyers (4).
3 credits, one term
Professor Bala
PREREQUISITE LAW-520 Family Law.  LAW-519 Children’s Law required for some clinical placements.
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LAW-590 Clinical Litigation Practice  
Queen's Legal Aid provides legal assistance to low-income area residents and to students at Queen's University. It also provides clinical legal experience to law students, helping them develop skill and confidence as legal professionals. Operating largely as a poverty law clinic, Queen's Legal Aid typically assists with criminal and quasi-criminal offences, landlord/tenant disputes, creditor/debtor matters, employment claims and income maintenance problems.   Under close supervision by clinic lawyers, law students interview and counsel clients, research legal issues, draft legal memoranda, provide legal opinions, prepare pleadings, negotiate settlements and participate in trials before criminal and civil courts, as well as hearings before administrative tribunals. Approximately eighty students work on clients' files during the academic year. Eighteen can register for Clinical Litigation Practice (LAW-590) and carry significant client service responsibilities for academic credit. They have weekly classes involving lectures, exercises and seminars. Topics covered include: advocacy in trials and hearings, interviewing and counselling, file management, legal ethics, legal research and writing, negotiation and settlement, office procedures, professional responsibility and solicitor/client relationships. Students in LAW-590 are expected to participate in weekly classes, present a short seminar and attend weekly meetings with colleagues and clinic lawyers. Students interested in this course should refer to information about the clinic in the Queen's Legal Aid chapter, and discuss any potential conflict of interest with the senior clinic lawyer.
4 credits per term, two terms
Ms. Bartley, Ms. Charlesworth
RECOMMENDED LAW-320 Evidence AND LAW-404 Criminal Procedure.
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LAW-562 Collective Agreement and Arbitration  
The collective agreement establishes the legal framework that governs the ongoing relationship between the employer, the union, and the unionized workforce. Grievance arbitration is the special mechanism that provides for the enforcement of this framework. This course examines some of the most important areas of arbitral jurisprudence and the main areas of interface between the arbitral process and the general legal process. Examples of topics to be covered are discipline and discharge, seniority, management rights, the remedial powers of arbitrators, the impact of external legislation, and evidentiary and procedural issues.
3 credits, winter term
Professor Emeritus Carter
PREREQUISITE LAW-560 Labour Law.
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LAW-441 Commercial Law
This course offers an examination of the laws governing the creation, perfection, and enforcement of secured transactions under Ontario’s Personal Property and Security Act.  Coverage will also include an overview of the law related to the sale of goods. 
3 credits, winter term 
Professor Monestier
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LAW-221 Comparative Constitutional Law  
In this course we will begin by examining the purposes and limits of comparative analysis in the field of constitutional law. We will then turn to a series of normative questions, assess how a variety of jurisdictions have addressed these, and reflect on the Canadian experience in light of this comparative assessment. Among the particular issues we will address are the following: What texts, norms and practices make up a constitution? Why does a constitution have a continuing claim to legitimacy? What claims to institutional competence and legitimacy can the executive, legislative and judicial branches make? What theories of interpretation should be available to courts adjudicating constitutional claims? How do cultural, structural and institutional contexts shape the content and scope of rights? Why and how do jurisdictions structure themselves as federal states?
3 credits, fall term
Professor Kong
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LAW-650 Comparative Legal Traditions
This course will introduce the students to legal traditions of the world. The aim of the course is to better enable students to participate in a global society by becoming more aware of the different legal traditions around the world and within Canada. Legal traditions that may be discussed are: indigenous, Talmudic, civil law , Islamic, common law, Hindu and Asian. Themes that may be considered are: the concepts of legal culture and tradition, comparative law and method, legal pluralism, multiculturalism, the decline of the homogenous nation-state and the rise of the decentralized state whose citizens have multiple loyalty references, and the impact of globalisation on the law.
3 credits, winter term
Professor Bailey
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LAW-473 Competitive Moot Court  
Queen's Faculty of Law regularly sends a moot team to several national and international moot competitions (listed in Programs of Study - Moots and Oral Advocacy - Competitive Moots). Upper year students have the opportunity to earn academic credit for representing Queen's on one of these teams. An internal moot competition is held in the fall to select team members. Successful candidates may enroll in LAW-473 Competitive Moot Court for three credits to be graded on a letter grade basis by the faculty supervisor upon completion of the moot. LAW-473 must be added during the period for adding and dropping winter term LL.B. courses (see Programs of Study - Bachelor of Laws Program - Course Selection - Adding and Dropping Assigned Courses).  
3 credits, winter term
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LAW-495 Competitive Moot II  
Students who successfully try out for a place on a competitive moot team for the second time may receive academic credit a second time by enrolling in LAW-495 Competitive Moot II. To qualify for LAW-495, they must moot on a different team than in the previous year. LAW-495 must be added during the period for adding and dropping winter term LL.B. courses (see Programs of Study - Bachelor of Laws Program - Course Selection - Adding and Dropping Assigned Courses).
3 credits, winter term
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LAW-550 Conflict of Laws
Conflict of laws, or private international law, deals with issues that arise when there is some foreign aspect to a private law dispute. The course covers three general areas: 1) jurisdiction in cases having foreign elements; 2) recognition and enforcement of foreign judgments; and 3) choice of law in cases involving some foreign element. Problems covered come mainly from torts, contracts, property, succession and family law. Note: there is some variation in the specific matters dealt with and prerequisites between the sections of this course, and one section is taught as a seminar while the other is a lecture course; individual descriptions for each section are posted at http://law.queensu.ca/students/llbProgram/2007-08upperYearProgram/courseDescriptions2007-08.pdf.
3 credits, one term
Professor Monestier, fall term; Professor Bailey, winter term
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LAW-468 Copyright Law
The law of copyright, that is, the protection of artistic, musical, literary, dramatic and other works under the federal Copyright Act. The course provides an introduction to the wider field of Intellectual Property, including consideration of the relation of Copyright to other specific fields of intellectual property law such as Patent, Trademark and Industrial Design, and Copyright's relation to common law and equitable rules governing Unfair Competition. The topics covered will include some or all of: fundamental principles of copyright, subject matter of copyright protection, ownership of, and dealing with copyright including the collective administration of copyrights, the extent and nature of protection including 'moral rights', and 'neighbouring' rights. As well as the historical and contemporary importance of the traditional forms of protected works, the course will address the impact of changing technology, particularly computers and the Internet, on copyright theory and application. Topics will also include consideration of copyright law reform processes and proposals, and the international copyright regime, particularly as found in the Berne Convention and the work of the World Intellectual Property Organization.
3 credits, fall term
Professor Emeritus Magnusson
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LAW-512 Corporate Finance
This seminar will examine the public interest and the lawyer’s role in assisting an enterprise to raise money to finance its existing or proposed activities. The legal entity or entities which may be used to carry on the enterprise and raise the money, whether an individual, partnership, private corporation, public corporation, not-for-profit corporation, co-operative, trust or combination of entities, and the consideration to be given in exchange for the money, will be reviewed. Sources of money, including family, friends, community, governments, fourth pillars, angels, venture capitalists, mutual funds, pension funds, banks, insurance companies and other financial institutions, and the manner in which investments by them may be structured and regulated, will be analyzed through seminar presentations. The seminar will include both theoretical review and the application of theory to case studies. Seminars will include introductory lectures (it is assumed students do not have undergraduate degrees in business or finance), student-led presentations and discussions of third party material and their own work.
3 credits, winter term
Mr. Connidis
PREREQUISITE LAW-440 Business Associations. LAW-448 Securities Regulation recommended but not required OR permission of the instructor.
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LAW-602 Corporate Governance
This seminar course examines the role of directors and senior officers in governing the public corporation. It also examines the rights of other stakeholders in the corporation, such as shareholders, employees and creditors. The course focuses on the legal foundations of the public corporation, including various conceptions of the firm in economic theory. Other topics that will be examined include: fiduciary duties; the separation of corporate control and ownership; the concept of "shareholder democracy"; corporate goals; the role of institutional investors; the respective roles of corporate law and securities law; and recent legislation adopted in response to corporate failures (such as Enron). The course is designed for students who wish to examine at an advanced level governance issues facing the public corporation.
3 credits, fall term
Professor Paton
PREREQUISITE LAW-440 Business Associations.   
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LAW-511 Corporate Taxation
This course examines the taxation of corporations and their shareholders and contrasts it with the treatment of partnerships, trusts and other taxable entities and intermediaries. The general theory of corporate taxation is considered, as well as the specific rules of the Income Tax Act. Among specific issues considered are the tax consequences of incorporation and of corporate reorganizations, tax aspects of business finance, the treatment of dividends and distributions, and tax planning for the family business.
3 credits, winter term
Mr. Morgan
PREREQUISITE LAW-508 Taxation. PREREQUISITE OR COREQUISITE LAW-440 Business Associations.
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LAW-655 Courts and Jurisdiction
In the era of a maturing Charter jurisprudence, courts are increasingly confronted with issues that raise the question: what are the limits of the judicial role?  This issue has been confronted in the context of increasingly-litigious issues that wander close to the traditional political sphere - such as health care allocation (e.g., Auton, Chaoulli); terrorism, national security, and immigration policy (e.g., Suresh, Charkaoui); social benefits entitlements (e.g. Gosselin); and the debate about “activist” courts and “judicial politics”.  Yet defining the limits of the judicial role is not a new problem.  Courts have long explored and drawn the limits of their own power through legal concepts such as inherent jurisdiction; the law of standing; “non-justiciability” and so-called political questions; and judicial discretion to refuse to grant or entertain relief.  Similarly, they have identified pre-requisites to the exercise of judicial power, such as independence, impartiality, and the maintenance of public confidence in the administration of justice. 
In this seminar, we will explore the law pertaining to courts and judges, the nature and extent of their jurisdiction and expertise, and will focus on both historical and modern flashpoints for the problems at this borderline between judicial and political power.  The early part of the term will focus on substantive law and theory, in order to provide a firm footing to examine specific topics of more recent attention.
3 credits, fall term  
Mr. Rees, Mr. Van Niejenhuis
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LAW-404 Criminal Procedure
Procedural dimensions of the criminal justice system are critically examined. The pervasive impact of the Charter is fully integrated and assessed. The pre-trial section includes police power to search and arrest, legal and illegal police discretion, show cause hearings (bail), the right to counsel, prosecutional powers and discretion and plea bargaining. Trial topics are jurisdiction, election, formal objections, joint trials, pleas, the doctrine of included offences, double jeopardy, preliminary inquiries, direct indictment, discovery and the unique features of trial by jury. At the post-trial stage, sentence and appellate options and the prerogative writs are briefly explored.
4 credits, fall term
Professor Stuart
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LAW-541 Developments in Global Governance
In 2005, the United Nations 60th anniversary attempt to fundamentally reform its institutions for global management of the use of force was not successful.  This course will build on the study entitled “A more secure world:  Our shared responsibility”, and will consider how international organizations can address the current problems connected with use of force.  The seminar will address six clusters of identified in the report:  (1) war between States; (2) violence within States, including civil wars, large scale human rights abuses and genocide; (3) poverty, infectious disease and environmental degradation; (4) nuclear, radiological, chemical and biological weapons; (5) terrorism; and (6) transnational organized crime. The Seminar/Forum will consist of a series of introductory sessionas, including guest speakers, followed by student presentations and papers on key topics (War on terror, Iraq, Afghanistran, Darfar, etc.)
3 credits, winter term
Professor Alexandrowicz
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LAW-640 Elder Law
This course covers the legal implications of an aging population, bringing together selected issues drawn from a number of areas of law to explore common themes and practical problems. The course will cover a diverse range of issues including health and long-term care planning, access to public benefits and the question of equal entitlement, surrogate decision-making, legal capacity, obligations of support and maintenance, and physical and financial abuse.
3 credits, fall term
Professor Freedman, Ms. Stewart Ferreira
RECOMMENDED any of LAW-307 Health Law, LAW-520 Family Law, or LAW-462 Wills and Estate Planning.
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LAW-567 Employment Law
The Supreme Court of Canada has acknowledged that the contract of employment is "unique", and governs a "special relationship" between the employer and the individual non-unionized employee. This course will explore central issues and themes in employment law, and will focus on the following topics: 1) the formation of the employment contract; 2) employee or independent contractor?; 3) who is the employer?; 4) the impact of legislation upon the employment relationship (The course will focus on employment standards, pay equity, and human rights legislation); 5) termination of the employment relationship including wrongful dismissal, just cause termination; 6) the rights and remedies available to employees (including a comparison of the federal statutory regime with the provincial regime). If time permits, there will be a discussion of issues pertaining to employees with disabilities including a discussion of the workers' compensation and occupational health and safety legislative regimes. 
3 credits, fall term
Ms. Regenbogen, Mr. Goodman
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LAW-326 Entertainment Law
This course will address the fundamentals of entertainment law, considering the application of contract law and intellectual property, with particular emphasis on film and television production, distribution, licensing and financing.  In addition, we will study the acquisition and management of rights in relation to new media.  The course will include an examination of governmental regulation of the industry in general, including the concept of “Canadian Content”, as well as current practical issues and approaches that arise in this interdisciplinary and specialized area of practice.
3 credits, winter term
Ms. Karnay
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LAW-517 Environmental Protection Law
This seminar focuses on the conceptual foundations of environmental protection law. We will examine and challenge the principles that underpin environmental legislation and policy, and consider competing models and theories. What does “protect the environment” mean?  Why does ecosystem decline occur?  What kind of legal mechanism could prevent it? Are the mechanisms now applied suitable to the task? If not, why not? What are the alternatives? Topics to be discussed include ecosystem management, environmental regulation, and civil liability for environmental harm. The emphasis will be on confronting the central dilemmas in environmental law and policy.
3 credits, winter term
Professor Pardy
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LAW-645 Estate Litigation
This seminar will explore the substantive, procedural, and practical issues relating to litigating claims by and against estates. Topics include will challenges, unjust enrichment claims, challenges to gifts, dependant support claims, and undue influence of elder persons. As this seminar meets the advocacy requirement for upper year course selection, the discussions will be focused on how to advocate these claims effectively before the courts and how to address the emotional issues relating to a grieving client.
3 credits, winter term
Ms. Griesdorf
LAW-462 Wills & Estate Planning, LAW-463 Trusts, and LAW-225 Civil Procedure recommended.
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LAW-546 European Union Law
This course examines the constitution and laws of the European Union (EU).  The EU embraces 27 member states with a population of half a billion people.  EU Law challenges traditional distinctions between international and domestic law, and orthodox assumptions about sovereignty and national identities.  It is based upon treaties between sovereign states, but it creates institutions and laws that have profound and direct implications for domestic law and governance within member states.  We will examine the constitutional structure of the EU, the role of the European Court of Justice in the interpretation of the EU treaties, the relationship between EU Law and the domestic laws and courts of member states, the development of laws relating to the free movement of workers, goods, capital, and services, the development of an EU jurisprudence on human rights and its relationship to domestic and international human rights norms and mechanisms, and EU efforts to develop common immigration, security and foreign relations policies.  Knowledge of EU Law is important for anyone interested in international trade and business law and/or public international law, including international human rights law. 
3 credits, fall term
Professor Walters
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LAW-320 Evidence
What are the objectives and what is the structure and content of the law governing judicial proof? As part of an allegedly rational system, how far are the rules consistent in principle and how do they work together? The course covers the common law of evidence, both civil and criminal, as it has been affected by legislation. Specifically, matters to be discussed include competence and compellability of witnesses, rules relating to the examination of witnesses, corroboration, burdens of proof and presumptions, judicial notice, illegally obtained evidence, privilege, hearsay, character, opinion, documentary and real evidence. Some attention will be devoted to the impact of new scientific knowledge and fact-finding techniques upon the system of judicial proof.
4 credits, one term
Professor Dufraimont, fall term; Professor Stuart, winter term
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LAW-520 Family Law
An introductory course concerning the basic principles governing the formation, operation and dissolution of the family in Canada. Specific topics to be considered are validity and annulment of marriage, rights and obligations of persons who cohabit outside marriage, gay and lesbian relationships, domestic contracts, domestic violence, support, custody and access to children, the law of divorce and ownership, possession and division of matrimonial property. Most attention will be paid to the law applicable in Ontario, but where appropriate, references and comparisons may be made to developments in other provinces and countries. There is substantial similarity in the family law of Canada's common law jurisdictions.
The primary focus of the course will be upon substantive legal principles, as developed by the legislatures and courts. Consideration will also be given to a variety of tactical, ethical, procedural and evidentiary issues as well as to questions of law reform. Tax implications of some situations will be discussed, but no background in this area is necessary. The psychological dynamics of matrimonial disputes will receive some attention as well.
4 credits, one term
Professor Bailey, fall term; Ms. Maur, winter term
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LAW-552 Fiduciary Obligation
Fiduciary Obligation will explore the rapid escalation to its current prominent status in modern Canadian jurisprudence. The course will trace the concept from its ancient origins in Equity to its ubiquitous presence in all areas of commercial, corporate, private and governmental law. Commencing with a discussion of the concept itself, the course will endeavour to deal with several distinct areas where the relationships have as their underpinnings a fiduciary duty: agent (real estate, stock brokers, promoters), solicitor-client, corporate (directors, officers, employees), private (clergy, teachers, family), governmental (aboriginal affairs, elected officials), etc. The course will conclude with an in depth discussion of the remarkable remedial power where the duty of utmost good faith applies and the courts' use of such equity-based power.
3 credits, winter term
Mr. Ellis
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LAW-307 Health Law
The course will provide an overview of fundamental legal issues in the field of health care. Beginning with the doctor-patient relationship, we will examine informed decision-making and the changing dynamics of medical practitioners and patients. This part of the course focuses on treatment decisions, substitute decision-making and medical malpractice. Following this we will explore questions in particular areas such as regulation of health professionals, construction of disease, reproduction and genetics, and confidentiality. In the course we will consider the extent to which core legal values are achieved in the health law area and analyze the impact on medical practice of legal practices and structures.
3 credits, fall term
Professor Peppin
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LAW-522 Human Rights
Canada has ratified over thirty international instruments relating to human rights. This course will examine the nature and extent of domestic human rights protection with reference to these international commitments. This examination will be undertaken with reference to the full range of human rights as envisaged in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and recently reaffirmed in the Vienna Declaration. The legal structure of Canadian human rights protection, its scope and its deficiencies, will be considered at the Constitutional and at the Federal and Provincial statutory levels. Among topics to be considered will be: the relation between the Charter of Rights and Freedoms and Canada's international human rights commitments; the relation between federal and provincial human rights statutes and Canada's international human rights commitments; the possible uses of these international instruments in domestic litigation; the role of these international instruments in judicial decision-making; the legal implications of these commitments for government decision-making; the issue of the domestic justiciability of human rights; and access to international human rights adjudication.
3 credits, winter term
Professor Corbett
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LAW-570 Images of Doctors and Lawyers
This seminar, open to 12 law and 12 medical students, uses literature (novels, short stories, plays, memoirs) to explore how each of these professions thinks of itself: their conceptions of professionalism, of professional ethics, of the skills required to practise law and medicine, as well as to explore how the two professions think of each other. The focus will be on doctors and lawyers, not on pathology.
3 credits, winter term
Professor Weisberg
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LAW-474 to LAW-493 Individual Supervised Project
Under faculty supervision, a student may be permitted to undertake the following: several short writing assignments in a program of independent study, the nature of the work to be agreed upon between the faculty supervisor and the student; a significant written project which, if satisfactorily completed, may fulfil the Substantial Term Paper Requirement (NOTE that this option is made available primarily for those students who wish to do research in a subject area for which no course is available); or a program of individualized study, the nature of the work to be agreed upon between the faculty supervisor and the student which may involve the writing of a paper or any other work (such as clinical work or involvement in test case litigation) that the supervisor agrees is appropriate. Students require prior approval of the faculty member for any individual supervised project.
A student may enrol in one Individual Supervised Project per term, for a maximum of four over the course of upper year study. The student must submit to the Manager, Academic Programs, a completed Approval Form, for Supervised Projects and Competitive Moot signed by both the student and faculty supervisor. This approval form is available from the Student Services Office and online at http://law.queensu.ca/students/llbProgram/studentForms/supervisedProjects.html
An Individual Supervised Project is normally weighted at 2 credits (or with permission of the instructor may be 3 to 6 credits and spread over one or two terms). Course numbers for Individual Supervised Projects vary with the number of credits assigned to the project and with the number of projects completed at the same credit level.
Course numbers for the Individual Supervised Project are assigned as follows:
LAW-474, 2 credits; students registering in a second, third or fourth Individual Supervised Project weighted at 2 credits will register in LAW-475, LAW-476, or LAW-477, respectively.
LAW-478, 3 credits; students registering in a second, third or fourth Individual Supervised Project weighted at 3 credits will register in LAW-479, LAW-480, or LAW-481, respectively.
LAW-482, 4 credits; students registering in a second, third or fourth Individual Supervised Project weighted at 4 credits will register in LAW-483, LAW-484, or LAW-485, respectively.
LAW-486, 5 credits; students registering in a second, third or fourth Individual Supervised Project weighted at 5 credits will register in LAW-487, LAW-488, or LAW-489, respectively.
LAW-490, 6 credits; students registering in a second, third or fourth Individual Supervised Project weighted at 6 credits will register in LAW-491, LAW-492, or LAW-493, respectively.
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LAW-443 Insurance
The course prompts an examination of fundamental issues in insurance law in a prescriptive way, relevant to today's lawyers. Insurance law is really a melding of contract principles with tort claims and so necessarily draws on the analytical foundation from both major areas of law. Really, insurance law is often about seeking compensation for a person in the wrong place at the wrong time. This course aims to provide a working knowledge of the terminology and doctrine in a variety of insurance law spheres: automobile, liability, property, life, health and disability insurance. Particular emphasis is placed on controversial issues in insurance contract interpretation. Liability of brokers and agents will also be discussed. Special topics also covered include how natural disasters, terrorism, and the 9/11 World Trade Center disaster affect insurance law; problems with concurrent causation; and viatical settlements (selling life insurance to a third party).
3 credits, fall term
Professor Knutsen
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LAW-612 International Commercial Arbitration
Increased international investment has engendered the rapid development of a new area of international law: investor-state arbitration or investment treaty arbitration. Investor-state arbitration is a field of international law that defines the rights and obligations of host states and international investors in those states. The procedural rules that have been created to facilitate investor-state disputes are primarily codified in the over 2,200 bilateral and multilateral investment treaties, including the North American Free Trade Agreement’s investment Chapter (NAFTA Chapter 11), that exist worldwide. This course will place heavy emphasis on the NAFTA Chapter 11 jurisprudence and the substantive and procedural provisions found in the text of NAFTA.  Decisions of Canadian courts relating to the enforcement of NAFTA Chapter 11 arbitration awards will also be canvassed.
3 credits, fall term 
Ms. Harrison, Mr. Sharma
PREREQUISITE Completion of all first year LL.B. courses.
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LAW-686 International Economic Law, Business Law and East Asia
The examination of current legal issues concerning the relationship between the economic development policies of the second tier of East Asia (Southeast Asia) nations and WTO, IMF and bilateral investment treaties. The course will examine temporary issues concerning FTAs fusion in East Asia, as well as the institutional issues concerning economic and business law in Southeast Asian nations, especially the experience of Thailand.
2 credits, fall term
Mr. Thanitcul
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LAW-538 International Environmental and Resource Law
International environmental and resource governance presents some of our most pressing current policy issues. This course will examine potential frameworks for resolution of international environmental and resource problems and the role for law and legal institutions. We will examine a variety of legal approaches, including treaty-based international law, customary international law, and rights-based environmental claims. We will also consider how international environmental and resource law intersect with other international legal regimes (GATT/WTO), the global activities of non-legal norm-setters, such as multinational enterprises, and consider how international and domestic law relate within this field.
3 credits, winter term
Professor Metcalf
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LAW-549 International Humanitarian Law (Military Law)
International Humanitarian Law, also known as the Law of Armed Conflict, determines the conditions under which states may resort to the use of armed force and how they may conduct hostilities during armed conflicts. This is a basic course that focuses on the regime of international instruments that limit the use of force between sovereign states and also between states and non-state actors, specifically the Law of The Hague and the Law of Geneva and the Additional Protocols. Particular emphasis will be placed on the problems of the treatment of detainees, the identification of combatants and non-combatants in post-modern warfare, and the protection afforded to civilians and civilian objects in a theatre of operations. In addition, students will examine the legal basis of Canada’s participation in contemporary conflicts.
3 credits, winter term
Major Waters
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LAW-542 International Human Rights Law
This seminar provides an overview of the international system for the protection of human rights. Seminars will consider the philosophical basis of international human rights; the nature and scope of human rights obligations established by international law; examine the mechanisms for enforcing human rights norms at both the international and regional level, through individual and interstate complaint procedures, periodic reporting requirements, and sanctions; and address the role of non-governmental organizations. A number of particularly challenging issues for international human rights law, including gender-related concerns, questions of cultural relativism, and the capacity of international law to contribute to social and economic reform, will be considered.
3 credits, fall term
Professor Alexandrowicz
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LAW-540 International Law
This is an introductory course which will attempt to explain the ever-expanding role of public international law in international and domestic affairs. It will examine the conceptual and institutional foundations of international law, including the sources of international law. The course will provide an overview of selected substantive areas of international law including participation in the international legal process, state responsibility, jurisdiction, territory, international organizations including the UN with some reference to the protection of human rights, environmental protection as well as limitations on the use of force. Throughout the course emphasis will be placed on Canadian practice and domestic application of international law.
3 credits, fall term
Professor Alexandrowicz
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LAW-559 International Labour Law
This course focuses on international labour law as a response to globalization.  It will introduce students to the main legal and policy issues surrounding labour law in the international context. Topics will include the multilateral system of workers rights (the International Labour Organization and international human rights conventions), regional systems of worker rights (the European Union, the NAFTA), the relationship between labour standards and international trade law, and corporate social responsibility and codes of conduct as alternatives to international legal regulation of work.
3 credits, winter term
Professor Banks
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LAW-622 International Norms of Minority Rights: Causes, Categories, Consequences
For much of the postwar period, international few contained if any provisions specifically targeted at the protection of ethnocultural minorities. In recent years, however, particularly since 1990, there has been an explosion of interest in codifying minority rights, both within the United Nations and within regional bodies, such as the Council of Europe or the Organization of American States. This course will consider a number of issues by these developments, including (a) why minority rights emerged as a priority for the international community in the post-Cold War era; (b) the categories that are used to identify different types of minorities, such as `indigenous peoples', `national minorities', and `migrant workers', and how these are viewed as raising different types of challenges; and (c) the consequences, both intended and unintended, of this process of codifying international minority rights norms on state-minority relations around the world. More generally, the course will attempt to identify the progressive potential in this process, but also some of the moral ambiguities and political complexities involved.
1 credit, winter term
Professor Kymlicka
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LAW-454 International Trade and Investment Law
As globalization gathers momentum, international laws governing how nations trade and invest across borders are increasingly important. Such laws increasingly limit government actions and affect peoples daily lives (and provide work for lawyers!) 
This course introduces international trade and investment laws. The course focuses on the World Trade Organization (WTO) laws on international trade, the application of those laws in Canadian law and the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) laws on foreign investment.
The course teaches the practical application of these laws through examining key cases. We will also examine the common principles underlying international trade and investment laws and criticism of those laws.
3 credits, winter term 
Mr. Gallus
 
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LAW-310 Jurisprudence
This course will provide a historical over-view of some of the main currents in recent legal theory in the English-speaking world. We will begin with a very brief over-view of some of the best-known works on legal theory from centuries past (St. Thomas Aquinas and the natural law tradition, John Locke and "natural rights," Jeremy Bentham and utilitarianism, John Austin and legal positivism). We will then examine the writings of four of the best-known recent writers in Anglo-American jurisprudence: H.L.A. Hart, Lon L. Fuller, Ronald Dworkin and Joseph Raz. We will follow some of the most important debates between these writers such as (1) the nature of a legal system; (2) the authority of law; (3) adjudication; (4) legal and moral rights; and (5) the rule of law. Finally, we will examine some of the more important critiques made in recent years of existing legal systems: law and feminism, critical race theory and critical theory.
3 credits, fall term
Professor Walters
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LAW-494 Labour: Individual Study
For MIR/LL.B. combined degree students only - Individual Supervised Project to be undertaken and completed in the winter term of the graduating year involving a topic related to their cooperative work placement; minimum credit weight of 4 credits.
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LAW-560 Labour Law
A survey of the law of labour-management relations, with emphasis on collective bargaining in the private sector. Employer, employee and union status under collective bargaining legislation. Protection of the right to organize. The certification process, and the importance of exclusive bargaining rights. The duty to bargain, and first-contract arbitration. Strikes, lockouts and picketing. The relationship between individual rights and collective rights, with particular reference to the implications of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Consideration of the conflicting moral and social values relevant to collective bargaining law. This course is a prerequisite or corequisite to several seminar courses in labour law.
4 credits, fall term
Professor Emeritus Adell, Professor Banks
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LAW-460 Land Transactions
An examination of some problems arising from the relation of vendor and purchaser; making, performing and enforcing the contract of sale; effect of the usual covenants; recording and land titles systems; priorities; fixtures. Mortgages and other devices in financing land transactions.
4 credits, winter term
Professor Alexandrowicz
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LAW-328 Law and Economics
The interaction between economics and law has provided a theoretical perspective that has significantly influenced the way that law is conceptualized and analyzed. The tools of economic analysis also provide one means of critically examining the way that law functions and thinking about how we might want to design laws to better achieve the social objectives that underpin them. This course will involve both study and critique of the law and economics approach.
The course will introduce students to the central tools and concepts of law and economics. We will begin with a brief introduction to some basic economic theory and move on to study the application of law and economics analysis to particular problems in a variety of substantive legal domains. Applications in the area of property, tort, criminal, environmental law and equality rights, among other substantive domains, will be considered.
3 credits, fall term
Professor Metcalf
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LAW-309 Law and Philosophy
This course will consist of discussion of selected topics in law and philosophy.  The primary focus will be “Persuasion:  How we persuade ourselves and each other”.  Readings will include Sophocles’s, Philoctetes, possibly one or two Platonic dialogues, and more modern treatments of the topic, both philosophical and literary.
3 credits, winter term
Professor Weisberg
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LAW-516 Law and Sexuality
This interdisciplinary seminar is being offered to students from all faculties. The course will focus on the legal status and civil rights of lesbian women, gay men, and other sexual minorities in Canada and other countries. It will include a consideration of employment law, estate planning and property rights of lesbians and gays, domestic law relating to same-sex relationships and partnership benefits, violence against lesbians and gays, race, gender and discrimination/constitutional law. The emphasis in the seminar will be on the development of a multi- and interdisciplinary perspective on this area of study, and will employ traditional research resources as well as emerging computer resources in the collection of materials. The course will be suitable for non-law students who have an interest in the contemporary or historical status of lesbian women, gay men and other sexual minorities, and previous study of law will not be required for enrolment.
3 credits, fall term
Professor Lahey
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LAW-621 Law and Terrorism
Terrorism against individuals and states has become a serious challenge for civilized societies at the turn of the 21st century - due to the physical threats it poses on the one hand and the fear that taking extreme measures against its perpetrators will overstep democratic values and infringe human rights on the other hand. Law and Terrorism: Theoretical and Comparative Perspectives is dedicated to analyzing the ways legal systems perceive terror and try to fight it. The course will use comparative methods, and in this context will evaluate various measures used against terrorists and individuals suspected as being terrorists in the United States, England and Israel. These measures will be evaluated vis- -vis concepts of human rights as well as international law. Measures to be discussed include inter alia administrative detentions, the use of physical measures in interrogations and targeted killings of active terrorists.
1 credit, fall term
Dr. Barak-Erez
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LAW-334 Legal Ethics
This courses explores ethical issues and dilemmas that lawyers face. Note: There is some variation in the specific matters dealt with between the sections of this course; individual descriptions for each section are posted at http://law.queensu.ca/students/llbProgram/2007-08upperYearProgram/courseDescriptions2007-08.pdf.
3 credits, one term
Professor Weisberg, fall term; Professor Paton, winter term
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LAW-332 Legal Imagination
A writing course exploring what one can learn and say about the legal imagination; what it can mean to learn to think and speak like a lawyer. Text: James B. White, The Legal Imagination.
3 credits, fall term
Professor Weisberg
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LAW-222 Legislatures and Legislation
In the study of law, we spend much more time reading cases and seeking to understand judging than reading legislative debates and seeking to understand legislating. This course explores several topics concerning legislation, legislatures and legislators through the lens of the ideas of democracy, constitutionalism, deliberation, and interpretation. The course combines research on practical legal issues with a theoretical exploration of law making. The first part of the course involves lectures on the legislative process as well as the various concepts required for the study of legislatures. The second part includes presentations by students. Each student will choose an Act or a group of Acts and will examine legislators' understanding and treatment of legal issues in the process leading to enactment.  
3 credits, fall term
Professor Kahana
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LAW-403 Mental Health Law
This course studies concepts and issues bearing upon health disciplines concerned with the management and treatment of psychiatric disorders, and provides a second-level offering in Criminal Law.  Standard areas covered are:  (1) a review of the major psychiatric disorders and the techniques of diagnosis; (2) conditions giving rise to claims for exemption or mitigation in criminal proceedings; (3) the uses and abuses of psychiatric and psychological evidence, and the cross-examination of expert witnesses in these disciplines; and (4) competency; civil commitment of the mentally ill, and related issues such as enforced treatment, the so-called ‘right to treatment’ and confidentiality.
3 credits, fall term
Professor Hanson
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LAW-465 Municipal Law
In this course we will examine the structure, powers and functions of local government institutions in Canada. Among the particular questions we will examine are the following:
What is the place of municipalities in the Canadian constitutional order? How are municipalities formed and how are their boundaries altered? How do municipalities address issues that have a regional scope? What are the mechanisms of land use regulation?
We will assess judicial, legislative and administrative responses to these questions in light of normative debates about the nature and purposes of local government regulation.
3 credits, winter term
Professor Kong
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LAW-335 Negotiation
The purpose of this seminar is to improve the negotiating skills of participants by having them engage in a systematic analysis of the process of negotiation and by involving them in a series of actual negotiating situations with extensive coaching and de-briefing. Topics to be covered will include understanding one's own negotiation style, analyzing problems, defining and uncovering interests, developing options, brainstorming, joint problem-solving, using fair standards, dealing with "hard bargainers" and understanding the norms and ethics which are part of the negotiating process. Negotiation role-plays will be taken from all areas from the simple to the more complex.
3 credits, fall term
Ms. Crush
NOTE: Students cannot enrol in more than one of either LAW-333 Alternative Dispute Resolution, LAW-337 Client Counselling and Dispute Resolution, or LAW-335 Negotiation, as there are subject areas common to both.
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LAW-681 Occupational Safety, Health and Workers' Compensation Law
Workplace health is a principal concern of industrial relations practice and generates considerable risk and liability for organizations. This course examines occupational safety and health (OSH) and workers' compensation law, policy, administration and compliance.  With a focus on industrial relations practice, the course addresses the purpose, economic rationale, business value and human resource implications of how the state regulates health in the workplace. The course examines occupational safety and health and workers' compensation systems, addressing such issues as OSH standards, due diligence, prosecutions, workplace injury and disease (for example, cancers and SARS).
3 credits, winter term
Mr. Law
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LAW-447 Patent Law
In the present era of rapid technological development, throughout the world and in Canada, there is tremendous interest in identifying, developing and protecting one's intellectual property. In high technology sectors, the primary emphasis is on patent protection. This course will provide an overview of the Canadian law of patents for invention. We will review the historical development of patents for invention, discuss the interrelationship between patents and other branches of Canadian IP law such as trade secrets, industrial designs, integrated circuit topographies, plant breeder's rights, copyrights and trade-marks and consider the formalities of filing a patent application in Canada. We will explore the basic principles of the patent system in Canada, namely patentable subject matter, novelty, inventive step, utility and sufficiency of the patent specification and discuss the various mechanisms for modifying a granted patent. We will study the enforcement of one's rights, whether by action for infringement, by licence and assignment or by the Notice of Compliance regime in place for pharmaceutical products. Finally, we will contrast differences in the patent procurement and enforcement schemes in place in the United States, Europe and Japan with those of Canada, as well as anticipated developments in patent law in the future, to the extent that time permits.
3 credits, fall term
Ms. Tape
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LAW-364 Personal Injury Advocacy
This course will focus on the various elements of advocacy involved in personal injury actions. Particular emphasis will be placed on practical application of trial techniques, strategies and key concepts for jury lawyers. Each week, students will develop their skills by applying these concepts to various cases in the instructor’s law practice. Students will be active participants in the process throughout. At the conclusion of the course, students will be able to analyze any fact scenario and consider how to incorporate the key concepts into presenting an effective case before a jury.  Students will learn how jurors make decisions and how that bears upon the preparation and presentation of evidence at trial.  Personal injury litigation involves ingenuity, intelligence and instinct.  It is not about learning the law.  It is learning to be a lawyer.
3 credits, winter term
Mr. Vigmond
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LAW-496 Public Service: Individual Study
For MPA/LL.B. combined degree students only - Individual Supervised Project to be undertaken and completed in the winter term of the graduating year involving a topic related to their cooperative work placement; minimum credit weight of 4 credits.
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LAW-587/588/589 Queen's Law Journal
The Queen's Law Journal is a refereed periodical devoted to the advancement of legal scholarship. Published twice annually, the Journal contains articles by academics, practitioners, judges, and some exceptionally high-quality student writing. The Journal offers training and experience in legal research, critical analysis, and precise writing.
The Journal is managed and edited by a board of student editors under the supervision of a faculty advisor. The editorial board is directed by six senior editors: the editor-in-chief, the managing editor, the planning editor, the production editor, the articles editor, and the submissions editor. Twelve additional students round out the editorial board. Editors are chosen for their academic excellence, relevant experience, and writing ability. The editor-in-chief receives 6 credits (LAW-589), the other senior editors receive 6 credits (LAW-588) and the associate editors receive 4 credits (LAW-587) upon successful performance of editorial and production duties. Editorial positions with academic credit are open only to second and third year LL.B. students and to LL.M. students, but first year LL.B. students are encouraged to become involved to familiarize themselves with the Journal. Note:  Students have been selected for 2007-08.
Professor Emeritus Adell
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LAW-591/592 Queen's Legal Aid Student Leadership
Queen's Legal Aid provides legal assistance to low-income area residents and to students at Queen's University. It also provides clinical legal experience to law students, helping them develop skill and confidence as legal professionals. Operating largely as a poverty law clinic, Queen's Legal Aid typically assists with criminal and quasi-criminal offences, landlord/tenant disputes, creditor/debtor matters, employment claims and income maintenance problems.
Under close supervision by clinic lawyers, law students interview and counsel clients, research legal issues, draft legal memoranda, provide legal opinions, prepare pleadings, negotiate settlements and participate in trials before criminal and civil courts, as well as hearings before administrative tribunals. Approximately eighty students work on clients' files during the academic year. Up to twelve students are hired to take responsibility for the files from May through August. In the academic year following their summer employment, these students take on mentoring and administrative responsibilities and are eligible for academic credits as student leaders of Queen's Legal Aid.
Second year students can obtain credits by registering in LAW-591. Third year students can obtain credits by registering in LAW-592. These credits are optional. They can either be allocated to one term or divided between two terms. They can also be accumulated during both second and third year law.
Students interested in these credits should refer to information about the clinic in the Queen's Legal Aid chapter, and discuss any potential conflict of interest with the senior clinic lawyer.
2 credits, fall and/or winter term
Ms. Bartley, Ms. Charlesworth
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LAW-575 Racism and Canadian Legal Culture
The purpose of this seminar course is to examine the role and effect of racism in Canadian legal culture, by discussing racism in Canadian legal history and the use of law in particular moments of Canadian social history characterized by racism; by examining racism in legal education (and education generally) and in the legal profession; and by discussing manifestations of racism in Canadian legal doctrine and the Canadian system of justice.
3 credits, fall term
Mr. Kissoon
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LAW-314 Remedies
The primary objective of this course is to introduce students to the principles governing the availability of remedies in equity.  Students will review the law in relation to the equitable remedies of injunctions, specific performance and financial relief in equity.
3 credits, fall term
Professor Emeritus Sadinsky
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LAW-448 Securities Regulation
This course examines the regulation of the Canadian capital markets. The course focuses on a number of specific issues such as disclosure obligations, the exempt market, public offerings, registration, self-regulatory organizations and enforcement issues. The course will examine the regulation pertaining to certain acquisition transactions such as take-over bids and going-private transactions. A main objective of the course will be to analyze the legislation and relevant case law with a view to developing an understanding of the rationale underlying securities law. A further focus of the course will be to discuss the law from a critical perspective to discern areas in which the regulation may be improved.
3 credits, winter term
Professor Paton 
PREREQUISITE OR COREQUISITE LAW-440 Business Associations.
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LAW-416 Sentencing and Imprisonment
This course examines the theory, practice and legal framework of sentencing and imprisonment. The first segment encompasses theories of punishment, the methodology of sentencing, and sentencing options. The second segment of the course looks at the processes of imprisonment and parole. The last segment of the course uses the seminar format to consider special issues and the situation of specific groups of offenders.
3 credits, fall term
Professor Manson
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LAW-594 Supervised Group Study for Third Year
Third year students may register in a program of supervised group study to undertake the supervised study of some common interest in law. Groups may be formed at student initiative but require the agreement of a faculty member to act as supervisor. Groups should be formed early in the winter term of the academic year previous to the academic year in which the group is to function, in order to permit the work of supervision of the group to be taken into account in mounting the curriculum. Students wishing to form a group are responsible for securing the consent of a faculty member to act as a supervisor.
Groups must have a minimum of six members and ordinarily will have a maximum of twelve members. Either Pass/Fail or traditional letter grading can be employed as the system of evaluation.
The Dean must approve the formation of groups. Students who are contemplating the formation of groups should discuss their plans with the Dean or Associate Dean.
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LAW-513 Tax Advocacy
This course will review the main aspects of the tax assessment and tax litigation process, including a discussion of negotiation strategies.  Students will be evaluated on the basis oftheir class participation, oral presentation exercises and written exercises.
2 credits, winter term
Justice Bell
PREREQUISITE Law-508 Taxation.
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LAW-508 Taxation
A comprehensive introduction to income taxation and the principles and operation of the Income Tax Act. Some of the topics included in the course are residence, the definition of income, deductions, capital cost allowance, capital gains and the taxation of corporations and their shareholders.
4 credits, one term
Professor Lahey, fall term; Professor Cockfield, winter term
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LAW-451 Trademarks and Unfair Competition
This course examines the law of private remedies for the protection of 'trade identity' and related intangibles of commercial value. The focus is the federal Trademarks Act and its impact on private rights to regulate the use of trademarks, tradenames and unfair competitive practices. The common law regulation of unfair competition and the law of tradenames under common law and federal and provincial incorporation statutes are also considered. The effect of the international regime on Canadian law, notably through the Paris Convention, and the international regime for protection under the protocol to the Madrid Agreement will be considered.
3 credits, fall term 
Professor Amani
Any course in IP is recommended but not necessary.
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LAW-360 Trial Advocacy
The learning of skills and techniques of advocacy in procedures such as pre-trial motions, examinations for discovery and examination and cross-examination of witnesses in civil matters. Students will participate in the preparation of materials and the presentation of arguments and examinations, and where possible and desirable, videotape will be used to aid in the evaluation and criticism of students' performances.  Note:  there is some variation in the specific matters dealt with and pre- and co-requisites amongst the sections of this course, as some sections focus on civil proceedings and others on criminal proceedings; individual descriptions for each section are posted at http://law.queensu.ca/students/llbProgram/2007-08upperYearProgram/courseDescriptions2007-08.pdf.
3 credits, one term
Mr. Hall, fall term; Mr. Burnstein, Mr. Hutchison, winter term
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LAW-463 Trusts
The institution of the trust, involving the separation of the control (in trustees) from the beneficial enjoyment of property, is of foundational importance in our law. Trusts concepts and devices are employed in a variety of modern contexts and are also increasingly used in commercial transactions. This course will cover basic doctrine and explore selected areas in further detail: for example, the nature of a trust; formal requirements of trusts; constitution of trusts; secret trusts; trusts, powers and purposes; certainties; property-holding by unincorporated associations; trusts for charitable purposes; some aspects of trustees' powers and duties; variation of trusts; resulting and constructive trusts, including some aspects of tracing and equitable wrongdoing.
3 credits, fall term
Professor Freedman
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LAW-462 Wills and Estate Planning
This course will examine the fundamentals of disposition of property upon death through a valid will, through other intentional devices like gifts and trusts, and, through intestacy. The course will concentrate on wills – formalities, capacity, revocation, execution, etc., - and the administration of an estate in accordance with the will and relevant legislation.
3 credits, winter term
Professor Freedman
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