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2010-2011 Academic Year

Arts and Science Departments, Programs and Courses Philosophy Courses of Instruction


Courses of Instruction
PREREQUISITES
The prerequisites for each course are stated in the course descriptions. However, a prerequisite may be waived in a particular case at the discretion of the Department.

AVAILABILITY
The Department of Philosophy does not offer all of the courses listed in the Calendar every year.
For the most up-to-date information on the availability of courses offered in the current year, check QCARD,explore the departmental web site or obtain a copy of the annual Undergraduate Philosophy Handbook, published in the Spring.

INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY
100-level courses have no prerequisites. They are designed to introduce students to some of the most important writers, problems and methods of philosophy. Instructors choose their own topics, textbooks, methods and emphases. Each course is intended to be equally suitable either as a sole course in philosophy or as a prelude to further study.
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PHIL-111/1.0 Great Works of Philosophy 3L/S
An introduction to philosophy through the examination of a number of classic philosophical works, with an evaluation of the positions and arguments offered in each.
Also offered at the Bader International Study Centre, Herstmonceux.
EXCLUSIONS PHIL 127, PHIL 151*.
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PHIL-115/1.0 Fundamental Questions 3L/S
Representative basic philosophical issues will be explored, such as: good and bad arguments, the source of moral obligation, the justification of knowledge claims, free will and determinism, the social enforcement of gender roles, taking responsibility for the environment, and the meaning of life.
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PHIL-127/1.0 An Historical Introduction to Philosophy 3L/S
A survey of some of the major figures, schools and themes in philosophy from ancient times to the present.
EXCLUSIONS PHIL 111, PHIL 151*.
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PHIL-151*/0.5 Great Works of Philosophy 3L
An examination of some major milestones in the development of philosophical thought. The course will involve both the exposition of texts and discussion of the philosophical issues which they raise.
EXCLUSIONS PHIL 111, PHIL 127.
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PHIL-152*/0.5 An Introduction to Metaphysics 3L/T
An introduction to metaphysics from both classical and contemporary sources. The course considers such topics as space and time, motion and matter, and the nature of consciousness.
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PHIL-153*/0.5 The State and the Citizen 3L
An introduction to political philosophy which explores the relationship between state and citizen. Issues include: civil disobedience, nationalism, the welfare state, anarchism and the capitalist state.
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PHIL-154*/0.5 Introductory Philosophy of Science 3L
What is science? The course explores this question through considering such issues as the aims of science, the nature of scientific explanation, the status of laws of nature and scientific theories, the history of science and the nature of scientific progress.
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PHIL-157*/0.5 Moral Issues 3L/S
An introduction to ethics via an examination of controversial moral issues. Special topics: abortion; animal rights; euthanasia.
Also offered as a distance course. Consult Continuing and Distance Studies.
Also offeredat the Bader International Study Centre, Herstmonceux.
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PHIL-158*/0.5 Critical Thinking 3L/S
A discussion of the general principles of reasonable discourse, with a focus on persuasive and cogent writing.
Also offered as a distance course. Consult Continuing and Distance Studies.
Also offeredat the Bader International Study Centre, Herstmonceux.
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PHIL-159*/0.5 Introduction to Ethics 3L
An introduction to the major issues in theoretical ethics (as distinct from particular moral issues): the nature of good, evil, right and wrong, the virtues and vices, the human good.
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PHIL-170*/0.5 Minds and Machines 3L
A survey of the contribution of philosophy to the cognitive sciences. The focus will be on providing a synthesis of the different perspectives brought by each of the disciplines, in particular, cognitive psychology, computer science, neurophysics, and linguistics, through an investigation of how the various approaches ultimately frame and answer our questions about the mind.
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PHIL-201*/0.5 Philosophy and Medicine 3L/S
The relationship between philosophical traditions and medical theory will be explored, as will the impact on philosophy of medical discoveries (such as anaesthesia and antibiotics) and diseases (such as the Black Death and AIDS). Emphasis is on concepts of disease from antiquity to the present. PREREQUISITE Completed 5.0 or more credits.
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PHIL-202*/0.5 Philosophy of Peace 3L/S
Drawing from a number of sources and philosophical traditions, this course will explore the concept of peace, obstacles to peace, ideas that promote peace, the moral dimensions of peace, philosophies of nonviolence, pacifism, and attempts to envision a peaceful world. PREREQUISITE 1.0 credit in philosophy.
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PHIL-203*/0.5 Science and Society 3L
Philosophical issues - both epistemological and ethical - involved in specific debates about the relationship between science and social issues. The course may focus, for instance, on recent 'popular' sociobiology efforts by biologists and others to establish scientific theories of human nature and human potential. PREREQUISITE  1.0 credit in philosophy.
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PHIL-204*/0.5 Life, Death, and Meaning    3L
An examination of whether life has 'meaning', and a consideration of different philosophical interpretations of the meaning of life, the significance of death for the meaning of life, and whether it even makes sense to speak of life as having meaning. PREREQUISITE    1.0 credit in philosophy.
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PHIL-232/1.0 Greek Philosophy 3L/S
Greek philosophy from Thales to Plotinus, with special emphasis on the metaphysical and epistemological doctrines of Plato and Aristotle. PREREQUISITE  An overall average of 70 per cent in all philosophy or classical studies courses previously taken, with a minimum of 1.0 credit.
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PHIL-240*/0.5 Philosophy of Education 3L
An examination of key issues and texts in the philosophy of education. Possible topics include the nature and aims of the learning process, progressive and conservative education, the politics of education, and contemporary debates regarding the canon.
PREREQUISITE    1.0 credit in philosophy.
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PHIL-250/1.0 Epistemology and Metaphysics 3L/S
An examination of the development of central debates in epistemology and metaphysics from the early modern period to the present. Focusing on the work of thinkers like Descartes, Kant, Wittgenstein and Quine, such questions as the nature and justification of knowledge, mind and body, personhood and community, truth and meaning will be discussed. PREREQUISITE   An overall average of 70 per cent in all philosophy courses previously taken, with a minimum of 1.0 credit; or third- or fourth-year standing in COGS.
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PHIL-253/1.0 Political Philosophy 3L/S
A close examination of the key thinkers, concepts and frameworks of political philosophy. The course has two components: historical, focusing on classical texts from Aristotle's Politics to Mill's On Liberty, and contemporary issues, such as justice rights, liberty, equality and discrimination. PREREQUISITE  An overall average of 70 per cent in all philosophy courses previously taken, with a minimum of 1.0 credit.
EXCLUSION POLS 250.
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PHIL-256*/0.5 Existentialism 3L/S
Representative figures from Kierkegaard to de Beauvoir will be the focus of attention in this overview of the main ideas of existentialism, a vital movement in contemporary philosophy. The foundations of existential thought, its distinctive style of argumentation and its relationship to the perennial concerns of philosophy will be explored. PREREQUISITE  1.0 credit in philosophy.
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PHIL-257/1.0 Ethics 3L/S
A study of problems in moral and/or political philosophy from the ancient or early modern period to the present. PREREQUISITE   An overall average of 70 per cent in all philosophy courses previously taken, with a minimum of 1.0 credit.
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PHIL-260*/0.5 Philosophy of Logic and Language 3L/S
The nature of the subject matter of logic; relations between formal logic and natural language, e.g., grammar and truth in logic and language; ontological commitments; the work of Russell and Quine. PREREQUISITE 1.0 credit in philosophy or linguistics.
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PHIL-261*/0.5 Philosophy of Mathematics 3L/S
A discussion of some ontological and epistemological problems associated with mathematics. PREREQUISITE Completed 5.0 or more credits.
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PHIL-263*/0.5 Philosophy of Religion 3L/S
A consideration of traditional and/or contemporary religious conceptions and arguments. Possible topics include: the nature and existence of God, and bases of religious claims. PREREQUISITE   1.0 credit in philosophy or religious studies.
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PHIL-271*/0.5 Philosophy and Literature 3L/S
A broad introduction to philosophical method and the nature of philosophical issues through a consideration of philosophic assumptions and theses present in important literary works. PREREQUISITE Completed 5.0 or more credits.
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PHIL-272*/0.5 Philosophy and Postmodernism 3L/S
An examination and comparison of Foucault's and Rorty's views: specifically, Foucault's concept of 'power' and Rorty's notion of legitimating practices, and assessment of whether they separately or jointly preclude or in the end only limit and qualify truth- and justification-claims. PREREQUISITE  1.0 credit in philosophy.
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PHIL-293*/0.5 Humans and the Natural World 3L/S
An introduction to environmental philosophy through a study of readings that have exercised a formative influence on Western thinking about the relationship between humans and the rest of nature, and hence also about human nature itself. The course will offer an environmental perspective on the history of philosophy from ancient to recent times. PREREQUISITE Completed 5.0 or more credits.
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PHIL-301*/0.5 Biomedical Ethics 3L/S
An investigation of some moral issues arising in connection with health care, including: the relationship between patient and health care provider; reproductive decision-making; euthanasia and the nature of death; and the development of health care policy. PREREQUISITE Completed 10.0 or more credits in any Faculty or School, or enrolled in the Faculty of Medicine.
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PHIL-303*/0.5 Ethics and Business 3L
An examination of the moral principles involved in the evaluation of business institutions, practices and decisions. Sample topics include: liberty, efficiency and the free market ideal; the market and justice in distribution. PREREQUISITE Completed 10.0 or more credits.
EXCLUSION COMM 338*.
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INTS-306*/0.5 Culture, Identity and Self 3L
For a complete description of this course, see International Studies.
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PHIL-307*/0.5 Latin American and Caribbean Philosophy 3L
Specific topics in or traditions within Latin American and Caribbean Philosophy. PREREQUISITE    Third-year standing, with 2.0 credits in Philosophy, English, History, or Political Studies.
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PHIL-310*/0.5 Development Ethics   3L
This course examines philosophical issues in the field of Global Development, such as what is meant by 'development', 'freedom' and 'quality of life'. PREREQUISITE    Third-year standing, with 2.0 credits in Philosophy, English, History or Political Studies.
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PHIL-311*/0.5 Philosophy of Psychology 3L/S
A philosophical understanding of the background to psychology. Topics may include the nature of mental representation, the place of 'folk psychology,' individualism in psychology, the nature of mental causation and explanation. PREREQUISITE PHIL 250 or 2.0 credits in psychology or permission of the Department.
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PHIL-316*/0.5 Philosophy of Art 3S
A study of what is involved in enjoying, understanding and interpreting works of art, and of the place of the arts in human culture. Writings of artists and critics, as well as those of philosophers, will be used. PREREQUISITE 2.0 credits in philosophy, at least 1.0 of which must be at the 200 level or higher, or 3.0 credits in English, fine art, art history, drama, music, or film studies.
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PHIL-318*/0.5 Philosophy of Law 3L/S
A survey of the central issues in the philosophy of law including a consideration of current jurisprudential controversies about the nature of law and philosophical treatments of problems arising from within the law such as paternalism, privacy, responsibility, and civil liberties. PREREQUISITE    Completed 10.0 or more credits.
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PHIL-324*/0.5 African Philosophy 3L
This course offers an introduction to African philosophical thought. After dealing with metatheoretical questions about the nature of philosophy and the philosophical inquirer, the focus will shift to African views on topics such as truth, the concept of a person, art, morality, slavery and colonialism. PREREQUISITE Completed 10.0 or more credits.
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PHIL-328*/0.5 Ancient Philosophy 2L;1S
A study of selected topics in ancient philosophy. PREREQUISITE Either PHIL 250 and PHIL 257, or PHIL 232 or permission of the Department.
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PHIL-329*/0.5 Early Modern Philosophy 3L
A study of selected topics in early modern philosophy. PREREQUISITES    2.0 credits in philosophy, at least 1.0 of which must be at the 200 level or higher.
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PHIL-330*/0.5 Investigations in the History of Philosophy 3L
An examination of perennial topics and/or important authors and schools of thought within the History of Philosophy. While the course will target material that has proven important to contemporary thinking, the emphasis will be onunderstanding the topics/authors/movements withintheir historical milieu. PREREQUISITES Two of PHIL 250, PHIL 257, PHIL 361*.
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PHIL-335*/0.5 Introduction to Kant 3L/S
An examination of the Critique of Pure Reason. PREREQUISITE PHIL 250 or permission of the Department.
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PHIL-343*/0.5 Social and Political Philosophy 3S
An examination of some of the principles and theories to which appeal is commonly made when social institutions and practices (and the policies associated with their establishment and maintenance) are subjected to critical scrutiny. PREREQUISITE PHIL 257 or permission of the Department.
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PHIL-347*/0.5 Contemporary Moral Philosophy 3L/S
A critical survey of some recent trends in moral philosophy. Study will begin with the emotive theory of ethics, and end with very recent works of importance in the field. PREREQUISITE PHIL 257 or permission of the Department.
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PHIL-348*/0.5 Freedom of the Will  3L/S
An examination of the concept of freedom of the will, with emphasis on the problems generated by causation and the notion of responsibility. PREREQUISITE    1.0 credit in philosophy.
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PHIL-351*/0.5 Philosophy of Mind 3L
A discussion of concepts and issues in the philosophy of mind. Sample topics include identity, action, emotion, intention, belief and desire. PREREQUISITE PHIL 250 or permission of the Department.
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PHIL-352*/0.5 Metaphysics 3L/S
The nature and varieties of metaphysics, including rationalistic 'Platonist' and empirical/descriptive 'Aristotelian' approaches. Positivistic and pragmatic anti-metaphysical 'critiques' and verificationism. Contemporary analytical metaphysics after Quine and Strawson. PREREQUISITE PHIL 250 or permission of the Department.
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PHIL-359*/0.5 Philosophy of Language 3L/S
Central issues include: the distinction between language and speech; the syntax/semantics/pragmatics trio; reference, denoting, names and descriptions; meaning, truth and verifiability; realism and anti-realism; linguistic forms of pragmatism, behaviourism, idealism, etc. PREREQUISITE PHIL 250 or permission of the Department.
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PHIL-361*/0.5 Introduction to Logic 3L/S
From propositional calculus tofirst-order monadic predicate calculus. Symbolization, rules of inference, derivation and refutation of arguments.
Also offered as a distance course. Consult Continuing and Distance Studies.
PREREQUISITE    An overall average of 70 per cent in all philosophy courses previously taken, with a minimum of 1.0 credit.
EXCLUSIONS CISC 204*; ELEC 270.
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PHIL-362*/0.5 Further Studies in Logic 3L/S
From first-order monadic predicate calculus to polyadic predicate calculus with identity. Symbolization, rules of inference, derivation and refutation of arguments. Introduction to modal logics. PREREQUISITE PHIL 258* or PHIL 361* orELEC 270.
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PHIL-367*/0.5 Jewish Philosophy 3L
An examination of key Jewish thought from Philo to Fackenheim, exploring such themes as the relationship between philosophy, literature, law, and religion; developments within Jewish philosophy; non-Jewish influences on Jewish thought and vice-versa.Contributions to contemporary philosophical work such as those in bioethics and postmodernism may also be considered. PREREQUISITE    1.0 credit in Philosophy or Jewish Studies, or permission of the Department.
EXCLUSION    PHIL 267*.
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PHIL-376*/0.5 Philosophy and Feminism 3L/S
An introduction to topics and issues in feminist philosophy. The influence of feminist perspectives on the framing and study of philosophical problems, and the contribution of philosophy to the development of feminist theory and practice will be central concerns. This course can be counted towards a minor, major or medial concentration in Gender Studies. PREREQUISITES  2.0 credits in philosophy, at least 1.0 of which must be at the 200 level or higher, or 2.0 credits in Gender Studies, at least 1.0 of which must be at the 200 level or higher, or permission of the Department.
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PHIL-381*/0.5 Philosophy of the Natural Sciences 3L/S
Topics may include the nature of scientific method; the meaning of laws of nature; theoretical entities; scientific explanation; causality, induction, and probability. PREREQUISITE Completed 10.0 or more credits.
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400-level courses are standardly offered in conjunction with corresponding graduate courses. Please consult the annual Department of Philosophy course brochure for current descriptions of 400-level courses on offer. Except where alternative prerequisites are indicated, all 400-level courses are open only to students in an honours program with a philosophy concentration, who have completed 14.0 or more credits.
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PHIL-402*/0.5 Current Issues in Moral Philosophy I   3S
An examination of major issues in contemporary moral philosophy.Possible topics to bediscussedinclude practical reason, moral realism, obligation, axiology and contractualism.
EXCLUSION    PHIL 456*.
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PHIL-403*/0.5 Current Issues in Moral Philosophy II 3S
For a complete description, see PHIL 402*.
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PHIL-405*/0.5 Current Issues in Social and Political Philosophy I  3S
An examination of major issues in contemporary social and political philosophy.Possible topics to be studied include communitarianism, liberalism, multi-culturalism, the nation-state, and utopias.
EXCLUSION    PHIL 453*.
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PHIL-406*/0.5 Current Issues in Social and Political Philosophy II 3S
For a complete description, see PHIL 405*.
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PHIL-407*/0.5 Current Issues in Social and Political Philosophy III 3S
For a complete description, see PHIL 405*.
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PHIL-408*/0.5 Topics in Philosophy of Law 3S
An examination of major issues in the philosophy of law. Possible topics to be studies include definitional questions, interpretivism, positivism, punishmentand the relationship between law and morality.
EXCLUSION    PHIL 458*.
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PHIL-410*/0.5 Topics in the History of Philosophy 3S
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PHIL-412*/0.5 Topics in Philosophy of Culture   3S
An examination of major issues in the philosophy of culture.Possible topics to be studied include: the history of the philosophy of culture; the relationship between culture and identity or the self;the relationship between culture and progress; and various forms of cultural relativism.
EXCLUSION    PHIL 461*.
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PHIL-420*/0.5 Ethical Issues I 3S
An examination of major issues in ethics. Possible topics to be considered include political violence, coercion, punishment, immigration, suicide, drug policy, leisure and akrasia.
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PHIL 421*/0.5 Ethical Issues II 3S
For a complete description, see PHIL 420*.
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PHIL-431*/0.5 Ancient Philosophy I 3S
An examination of major issues in ancient philosophy. Possible topics to be considered include the appearance/reality distinction, causation, the emotions, happiness (eudaimonia) and substance.
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PHIL-432*/0.5 Ancient Philosophy II 3S
For a complete description, see PHIL 431*.
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PHIL-435*/0.5 Modern Philosophy 3S
An examination of major issues in modern philosophy.Possible topics to be considered include arguments for the existence of God, causation, happiness, representationalism, scepticism and substance.
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PHIL-436*/0.5 19th Century Philosophy 3S
An examination of major issues in 19th century philosophy.Possible topics to be studied include post-Kantian German philosophy, phenomenalism, the philosophy of history, the rise of pragmatism, and the rise of modern logic.
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PHIL-441*/0.5 20th Century Philosophy I 3S
An examination of major issues in 20th century philosophy. Possible topics to be studied include debates about modality, the development of logic, the natural language movement, pragmatism and verificationism.
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PHIL-442*/0.5 20th Century Philosophy II 3S
For a complete description, see PHIL 441*.
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PHIL-445*/0.5 Major Figures I 3S
An examination of the key ideas from a major figure in the history of philosophy. Philosophers studied will vary from offering-to-offering, including Aristotle, Aquinas, Kant, Mill and Rawls.
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PHIL-446*/0.5 Major Figures II 3S
For a complete description, see PHIL 445*.
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PHIL-447*/0.5 Major Figures III 3S
For a complete description, see PHIL 445*.
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PHIL-451*/0.5 Current Issues in Epistemology 3S
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PHIL-452*/0.5 Current Issues in Metaphysics I 3S
An examination of major issues in contemporary metaphysics. Possible topics include causation, properties, time, modal theory, and induction.
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PHIL-454*/0.5 Topics in Feminist Philosophy 3S
PREREQUISITE  Also open to students in a Gender Studies medial, major or special field concentration who have completed 14.0 or more credits. 
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PHIL-459*/0.5 Current Issues in Philosophy of Language I   3S
An examination of major issues in contemporary philosophy of language. Possible topics to be studied include: the nature of meaning; the relationship between language and the mind, as well as language and the world; and the syntax, semantics and pragmatics of natural language. PREREQUISITES    Students must be in an honours program with a philosophy concentration and have completed at least 14.0 credits or else have the permission of the Department. Also open to students in a linguistics program who have completed 14.0 or more credits.
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PHIL-460*/0.5 Current Issues in Philosophy of Language II 3S
For a complete description, see PHIL 459*. PREREQUISITES    Students must be in an honours program with a philosophy concentration and have completed at least 14.0 credits or else have the permission of the Department. Also open to students in a linguistics program who have completed 14.0 or more credits.
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PHIL-463*/0.5 Current Issues in Metaphysics II 3S
For a complete description, see PHIL 452*.
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PHIL-464*/0.5 Topics in Philosophy of Mind 3S
An examination of major issues in contemporary philosophy of mind.Possible topics to be considered include: consciousness; definitional questions (what is the mind?); mental causation; mental events; mental properties; and various theories about the nature of the mind.
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PHIL-466*/0.5 Topics in the Philosophy of Art 3S
An examination of major issues in the philosophy of art. Possible topics include: the definition of art, art and the emotions, art and interpretation, art and the aesthetic, and the philosophy of particular artforms (i.e., literature, film).
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PHIL-467*/0.5 Hermeneutics 3S
An examination of major issues in hermeneutics or the theory of interpretation. Possible topics to be studied include the history of hermeneutics, objectivity and relativism, critiques of ideology, semiotics, and pragmatism.
EXCLUSION    PHIL 416*.
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PHIL-470*/0.5 Topics in Philosophy in Science  3S
An examination of major issues in the philosophy of science. Possible topics to be considered include explanation, realism versus instrumentalism scientific progress, the social dimensions of science and the unity of the sciences.
EXCLUSION    PHIL 450*.
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PHIL-471*/0.5 Current Issues in Medical Epistemology   3S
An examination of epistemic issues arising from or pertaining to medicine.Possible topics to be considered include the nature of disease, concepts of scientific discovery as found in medicine, and the relationship between medical research and clinical practice.
EXCLUSION    PHIL 401*.
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PHIL-473*/0.5 Philosophical Logic   3S
An examination of major issues in the philosophy of logic. Possible topics to be considered include deviant logics, the nature of identity, modal logics and the paradoxes of material implication and strict conditionals. PREREQUISITES PHIL 361*, PHIL 362*.
EXCLUSION    PHIL 462*.
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PHIL-488*/0.5 Pragmatism 3S
In this study of pragmatist thought, authors to be considered may include classical pragmatists such as Pierce, James and Dewey as well as contemporary pragmatists such as Quine and Rorty.
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PHIL-493*/0.5 Ethics and the Environment 3S
PREREQUISITE  Also open to students in an Environmental Science Honours B.Sc. program or in an Environmental Studies medial who have completed 14.0 or more credits. 
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PHIL-497*/0.5 Ethics and Animals 3S
PREREQUISITE  Also open to students in an Environmental Science Honours B.Sc. program or in an Environmental Studies medial who have completed 14.0 or more credits. 
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PHIL-500/1.0 Directed Special Studies
NOTE Credit restricted to the equivalent of 1.0 credit in the Directed Special Studies series. PREREQUISITE  Admission to the final year of an honours program and permission of the Department.
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PHIL-510*/0.5 Directed Special Studies
NOTE Credit restricted to the equivalent of 1.0 credit in the Directed Special Studies series. PREREQUISITE  Admission to the final year of an honours program and permission of the Department.
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PHIL-511*/0.5 Directed Special Studies
NOTE Credit restricted to the equivalent of 1.0 credit in the Directed Special Studies series. PREREQUISITE  Admission to the final year of an honours program and permission of the Department.
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Arts and Science Departments, Programs and Courses Philosophy Courses of Instruction
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