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2010-2011 Academic Year

Arts and Science Departments, Programs and Courses Commerce Courses of Instruction


Courses of Instruction
Enrolment in Commerce Courses
Students may offer as many as 4.0 credits in commerce and international law as electives toward any program in the Faculty of Arts and Science. All commerce courses have a limited enrolment; preference will be given to students in the School of Business.
 
First-year Arts and Science students are not permitted to register in commerce courses for the Fall or Winter Terms. While no first-year student will be permitted to add a Fall Term commerce course, adding a Winter Term course will be permitted on an individual basis.
 
Second-, third-, and fourth-year non-Commerce students may enrol in a maximum of 2.0 commerce credits in an academic year.
 
Upper-year Arts and Science students planning to enrol in commerce courses for 2009-2010 must participate in registration (see Key Dates). Students who have not registered may be admitted to a commerce course during the fall registration period based on space available.
 
The following Commerce courses are open to non-Commerce students. Students must meet the prerequisites indicated (or their equivalents) in order to access commerce courses during registration.
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COMM-200*/0.5 Introduction to Business
This course will develop an appreciation of the role of the manager and business in society. It will discuss Canadian and global trends and issues - political, economic, technological, and ethical - that affect business and management. The course will introduce the student to the nature of the modern corporate enterprise, large and small, and begin the building of business analysis skills.
NOTE    This course is not open to students enrolled in the Commerce Program.
EXCLUSION    COMM 103*†.
† Open only to students enrolled in the School of Business.
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COMM-211*/0.5 Introduction to Financial Accounting
As the initial course in accounting, this course provides a foundation of accounting knowledge necessary to the fuller appreciation of many aspects of business. The structure of the process of accounting is studied, with particular emphasis on the use, interpretation, and communication of financial information. NOTE    This course not available to students enrolled in the Commerce Program.
EXCLUSION    COMM 111*†.
† Open only to students enrolled in the School of Business.
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COMM-212*/0.5 Introduction to Management Accounting
An examination of the internal accounting model and related information systems designed to keep the manager informed for the purpose of planning and controlling the organization's operations.
NOTE    This course is not open to students enrolled in the Bachelor of Commerce Program.
PREREQUISITES    COMM 111*† or COMM 211* or equivalent and an introductory course in Economics.
EXCLUSION    COMM 112*†.
† Open only to students enrolled in the School of Business.
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COMM-221*/0.5 Introduction to Finance
The focus is on financial decisions of the firm and the consumer. The two main tasks of financial management, investment choices and financing choices, are examined with emphasis on separation of the investment decision and the owners' consumption decisions, on net present value in capital budgeting, and on capital structure. The course examines choices of portfolios by consumers and how these choices lead to equilibrium opportunity rates.
NOTE    This course is not open to students enrolled in the Commerce Program.
PREREQUISITE    COMM 211*.
EXCLUSION    COMM 121*†.
† Open only to students enrolled in the School of Business.
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COMM-226*/0.5 Comparative Financial Institutions
This course provides an introductory comparative analysis of financial institutions and financial markets in major countries. The course will examine examples of international finance as practiced in the Euromarkets and examples of domestic practice in such countries as Great Britain, the United States, and Japan.
NOTE    This course is not open to students enrolled in the Commerce Program.
Offered only at the Bader International Study Centre, Herstmonceux.
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COMM-231*/0.5 Introduction to Marketing
This course provides students with a knowledge of the concepts of marketing as well as an understanding of how these concepts are applied in the management of the firm. Specifically, the objectives are: to provide a working knowledge of the basic theories and concepts in marketing; to develop decision making skills and abilities and to gain experience in developing marketing strategies and plans. The course is taught using a combination of lectures, discussions, case analyses, student presentations, and exams.
NOTE    This course is not open to students enrolled in the Commerce Program.
PREREQUISITE    ECON 110 recommended.
EXCLUSION    COMM 131*†.
† Open only to students enrolled in the School of Business.
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COMM-251*/0.5 Organizational Behaviour
This course introduces students to the study of human behaviour in organizations. The purpose is to provide a coherent account of the causes and consequences of organizational behaviour. Lectures, discussions, cases and exercises will be used to broaden the students' understanding of working environments. Whenever possible, students' own employment experiences will be drawn upon as a basis for understanding the concepts discussed.
NOTE    This course is not open to students enrolled in the Commerce Program
Also offered as a distance course. Consult Continuing and Distance Studies.
EXCLUSION    COMM 151*†.
† Open only to students enrolled in the School of Business.
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COMM-274*/0.5 International Business Strategy
An examination of the distinctive management problems and opportunities that arise when a company is operating, or contemplating operating, in more than one country. The course reviews methods of entering a foreign market, and organizing international operations.
Offered only at the Bader International Study Centre, Herstmonceux.
PREREQUISITE    Permission of the School of Business. Restricted to non-Commerce students only.
EXCLUSION    COMM 374*†.
† Open only to students enrolled in the School of Business.
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COMM-303*/0.5 Business and Ethics
Business ethics is increasingly important as expectations of corporate social responsibility keep rising, as do negative consequences for failing those expectations. Public, institutional, regulatory and government pressures mean decisions on business ethics can now determine corporate and career survival. This advance course on business ethics builds on the introductory Business Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility course in second year and is a credit toward the Certificate in Corporate Social Responsibility. It is intended to produce capability and commitment in a new core competence for future managers. The course will go into depth in critical areas such as professional ethics, moral standards, stakeholder management, decision models and designing ethics programs to achieve an ethical workplace and corporate social responsibility objectives. A number of critical issues will be explored in depth. PREREQUISITE    Admission restricted to third- and fourth-year students in their program.
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COMM-308*/0.5 Canadian Business History
The purpose of this course is to give the student of management the opportunity to study and analyze the history of the evolution of Canadian industries (and some of Canada's leading corporations) as well as the emergence of the professional manager. The student should gain a deeper understanding of the roots of Canadian business, but more importantly, be able to understand and appreciate the complex internal and external forces which must be considered today when making critical business decisions. The course will be of interest to students who plan to follow a career in management as either a practitioner or a consultant and to those who will need to be able to do a comprehensive analysis and assessment of the financial and managerial performance of the modern firm.   PREREQUISITE    This course is restricted to students enrolled in the third and fourth year of their program.
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COMM-310*/0.5 Environmental Accounting 
The course examines the use of information about environmental costs and benefits in organizational decision-making (e.g. product costing, capital investments and performance measurement), managing the organization's relationship with stakeholders, and in national policy-making. Students would benefit from basic knowledge of economics, statistics and accounting but no prerequisites are required.
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COMM-311*/0.5 Financial Accounting Practices, Principles and Concepts
This is the first of two courses that constitute intermediate financial accounting. In these courses, generally accepted accounting principles and the basic assumptions underlying financial accounting decisions are examined in detail. Specific topics in this course include the Statement of Cash Flows, receivables, short- and long-term investments, and tangible and intangible capital assets. PREREQUISITE    COMM 111*† or COMM 211*.
† Open only to students enrolled in the School of Business.
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COMM-312*/0.5 Intermediate Management Accounting
The accounting concepts and analytical tools that are useful in planning and controlling organizational activity and in management decision-making. The principal costing systems and the related problems of cost estimation and cost allocations will be studied in greater depth than in the introductory course. A mixture of problem-solving exercises, discussion questions, cases, and readings may be employed. It is a prerequisite for this course that students have a working knowledge of introductory statistics (particularly regression analysis). PREREQUISITE    COMM 112*† or COMM 212*, and COMM 162*† or equivalent.
† Open only to students enrolled in the School of Business.
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COMM-313*/0.5 Financial Accounting II
A continuation of COMM 311*, Intermediate Accounting. Topics to be covered include all aspects of the Liability and Equity side of the Balance Sheet, i.e., Current and Long Term Liabilities, Complex Financial Instruments, and Shareholders' Equity, as well as Interperiod and Intraperiod Allocation of Income Taxes; Pensions; Funds Flow Analysis; Earnings Per Share, and Disclosure Requirements. The intention is to provide students will a comprehensive appreciation of the intricacies of accounting reporting and its impact on the perception of the financial health of an organization. PREREQUISITE    COMM 311* or permission of the School of Business.
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COMM-322*/0.5 Financial Management: Strategy
Strategic decisions that affect the long-run value of the firm. Some widely used tools of financial decision-making are shown to be correct only under restricted conditions. Further, other decision rules are found to be of substance only under conditions of uncertainty and/or in the presence of capital market imperfections. A frame-work is developed to show that direct and comprehensible approaches to financial policy problems exist with perfect capital markets under conditions of uncertainty, and, under some conditions, with capital market imperfections. Emphasis is placed on using theory to structure financial managers' decision problems. PREREQUISITE    COMM 121*† or COMM 221*. Admission restricted to third- and fourth-year students.
† Open only to students enrolled in the School of Business.
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COMM-323*/0.5 Corporate Financial Planning
The practical application of financial management principles using case studies. For a list of topics, check the School of Business Calendar on the School's web site. PREREQUISITE    COMM 121*† or COMM 221*. Admission restricted to third- and fourth-year students.
† Open only to students enrolled in the School of Business.
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COMM-324*/0.5 Investment and Portfolio Management
This course presents important models in finance that can be solved either numerically or with simulations. In either case the models are built with the aid of Excel spreadsheets, and calculations are supplemented when necessary with Visual Basic programs. The classes of models covered include Portfolio Models (example: Estimating betas, finding efficient portfolios), Option Pricing Models (example: Black-Scholes, binomial pricing models, portfolio insurance), Bonds and Duration (example: immunization strategies, modeling the term structure). The course emphasizes the intuition underlying the models and shows how intuition can be cultivated with appropriate use of spreadsheets and computer graphics. It also argues that the tools of Visual Basic can be used to organize the repetitive tasks of spreadsheet analysis and make presentations more forceful. PREREQUISITE    COMM 121*. Admission restricted to third- and fourth-year students.
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COMM-325*/0.5 Advanced Topics in Financial Theory
This course presents important models in finance that can be solved either numerically or with simulations. In either case the models are built with the aid of Excel spreadsheets, and calculations are supplemented when necessary with Visual Basic programs. The classes of models covered include Portfolio Models (example: Estimating betas, finding efficient portfolios), Option Pricing Models (example: Block-Scholes, binomial pricing model, portfolio insurance) Bonds and Duration (example: immunization strategies; modeling the term structure). The course emphasizes the intuition underlying the models and shows how intuition can be cultivated with appropriate use of spreadsheets and computer graphics.  It also argues that the tools of Visual Basic can be used to organize the repetitive tasks of spreadsheet analysis and make presentations more forceful. PREREQUISITES    COMM 121*† or 221*, and ECON 212*; or COMM 322* or equivalent. Admission restricted to third- and fourth-year students.
† Open only to students enrolled in the School of Business.
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COMM-328*/0.5 International Finance
This course focuses on the financial issues that managers confront in an international setting and develops a framework for evaluating the many opportunities, costs, and risks associated with multinational operations. The course employs cases extensively to provide students with a detailed and analytic look at investment and financial decisions undertaken by multinational firms. Topics covered include: determination of exchange rates; currency futures, options and swaps; international investing; foreign exchange exposure; hedging exchange risk; and cross-border valuation.
Also offered at the Bader International Study Centre, Herstmonceux.
PREREQUISITE    COMM 121*† or COMM 221* or permission of the School of Business. Admission restricted to third- and fourth-year students.
† Open only to students enrolled in the School of Business.
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COMM-329*/0.5 Management of Financial Institutions
The goals, roles and structure of financial intermediaries and the growth, financial and risk management, and marketing decision problems facing the managers of these institutions. The course takes the viewpoint of the managers of the various kinds of financial institutions and concentrates on developing frameworks and solution procedures for the decision problems facing them. The course will consist of a blend of lectures, readings, and case analyses, and emphasize the practical application of financial analysis tools and techniques. PREREQUISITE    COMM 121*† or COMM 221*, ECON 212* and ECON 222*. Admission restricted to third- and fourth-year students.
† Open only to students enrolled in the School of Business.
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COMM-331*/0.5 International Marketing
An overview of international marketing, this course focuses on the formation and revision of international-level strategies, and the issues related to consumer and competitive analysis in the European and international markets.
Offered only at the Bader International Study Centre, Herstmonceux.
PREREQUISITE    COMM 131*† or COMM 231* or permission of the School of Business. Admission restricted to third- and fourth-year students.
† Open only to students enrolled in the School of Business.
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COMM-332*/0.5 Marketing Research
This course is designed to provide students with an appreciation and understanding of the marketing research process, its uses, limitations and biases. Its objectives include providing students with a working knowledge of the concepts, methods and problems of marketing research; developing students' problem-analysis skills and the ability to translate a management problem into a feasible research question; increasing students' sensitivity to the biases and limitations of marketing research; and developing students' ability to critically evaluate a research design, yet still identify useful information. The course is taught using a combination of lectures, discussions, exercises, case analyses and assignments. PREREQUISITES    COMM 131*†, COMM 132*† or COMM 231*, and COMM 162*† (or equivalent), or permission of the instructor. Admission restricted to third- and fourth-year students.
† Open only to students enrolled in the School of Business.
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COMM-333*/0.5 Marketing Strategy
This course provides students with tools to plan and implement a competitively superior marketing strategy. Students will learn how to develop product/market objectives, to select markets in which firms can operate with competitive advantage, and how to develop marketing mix tactics based upon the desired strategic vision. The course examines issues such as evaluating opportunities in new, growing or mature markets, understanding consumer behaviour and strategies for entering international markets and growing profitable brands. PREREQUISITE    COMM 131*†, COMM 132*† or COMM 231*, or permission of the instructor. Admission restricted to third- and fourth-year students.
† Open only to students enrolled in the School of Business.
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COMM-341*/0.5 Introduction to Production and Operations Management
The course relates operations management to other business decision areas and to the entire organization. It will examine current problem areas with illustrations from manufacturing and service businesses both large and small, as well as public sector organizations. Included are topics such as process analysis, quality assurance, materials management, workforce management and the management of service operations. PREREQUISITE    Admission restricted to third- and fourth-year students.
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COMM-351*/0.5 Leadership
This seminar style course examines the practice and impact of leadership in organizations and communities as we enter into the 21st century. The evolvement of leadership from the command and control style to the more recent transformational and/or authentic style will be examined in a variety of settings as described in both popular and academic writings on and about leadership. The impact of leadership on society will be examined through class dialogue, guest speakers, and multi-media sources. The course also examines emerging trends in team effectiveness in the 21st century, and team projects will be utilized. This course is open to non-commerce students providing they have the required prerequisite. PREREQUISITE    COMM 151*† or COMM 251*. Admission restricted to third- and fourth-year students.
† Open only to students enrolled in the School of Business.
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COMM-352*/0.5 Organizational Analysis
This advanced course in organizational behaviour goes beyond COMM 151* by providing more breadth and depth for understanding and analyzing behaviour in organizations. The focus will be social scientific research that explores the practice of building and managing professional relationships in organizations. Topics include organizational justice, trust and betrayal, employee deviance, emotions in organizations, conflict and peacemaking, power and politics, and social capital and networks. PREREQUISITE    COMM 151*† or COMM 251* or permission of the instructor. Admission restricted to third- and fourth-year students.
† Open only to students enrolled in the School of Business.
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COMM-353*/0.5 Managing in a Multicultural Environment
The purpose of this course is to develop both the intellectual understanding and the behavioural skills necessary to manage effectively in other cultural environments and to work effectively with people from other cultures. The objectives of the course are: to develop an awareness of the pervasive and hidden influence of culture on behaviour, particularly with respect to management and management practices; to develop familiarity with the types of situations and issues which managers often confront when working internationally; and to develop an appreciation of the impact on personal behaviour of living and working in another culture. Topics covered include effective communication across cultures, the effect of culture on management practices, selecting and training personnel for international assignments, managing in less developed and former socialist countries, and ethical issues. PREREQUISITE    Admission restricted to third- and fourth-year students in their program.
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COMM-355*/0.5 Group Processes in Organizations
The purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of group and team processes in organizations. It will cover current best practices and organizational research to help students develop an intellectual understanding of how groups and teams operate. It will also include opportunities for students to use this understanding to build teamwork skills. Topics covered in the course may include group formation and change, group composition and roles, group decision-making and problem-solving, conflict and cooperation in groups, power and politics within and between groups, pro-social and anti-social behavior, diversity, and virtual groups. PREREQUISITE    COMM 151* or COMM 251*. Admission restricted to third- and fourth-year students.
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COMM-356*/0.5 Gender Issues in Management
The purpose of this course is to assist women and men to develop an understanding of the role of gender in their future as managers and colleagues in the business environment and in their personal lives through a highly interactive classroom setting. It will examine current organizational demographics, current research, and best organizational practices with respect to the management of gender related issues, leadership, and communication similarities and differences between women and men, mentoring, work and family issues, and sexuality in the workplace. The history and societal norms and expectations about gender will also be examined to broaden understanding of the context of the managerial role.
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COMM-357*/0.5 Interpersonal Skills for Managers
This course is designed to focus on the practical application of organizational behaviour knowledge to the effective and productive management of people at work. The objective is to develop interpersonal skills crucial to the manager's role, including self-awareness, stress and time management, creativity and problem-solving, communications and public speaking, conflict management, influencing others and the management of meetings. PREREQUISITE    Admission restricted to third- and fourth-year students.
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COMM-359*/0.5 Power and Organizational Politics
A key task for today’s managers is the ability to pull together the very best skills and resources to get things done in organizations. Power dynamics are a fundamental part of managerial work and both organizational and individual effectiveness rests on understanding those dynamics and using them effectively. This course provides a framework for analyzing the sources of power in organizations, and the circumstances that lead to its attainment and effective use. We draw upon case studies and students own experiences as well as research from the fields of management, political science, psychology, and sociology to further our understanding of power and political processes in organizational settings. Topics covered include the nature and sources of power, conflict management, interpersonal influence and persuasion, ethics, network structures and social capital. PREREQUISITE    COMM 151* or COMM 251*. Admission restricted to third- and fourth-year students.
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COMM-375*/0.5 Environment of International Business
This course introduces students to the relevant non-market actors that affect the international operations of corporations, and provides theoretical frameworks for managing their impact on the international firm. Topics will include the international trading environment, political and country risk analysis, the motivations of national governments, international and national regulators, and the interaction of firms with government, industry and lobby groups. The course combines critical readings and case analysis, and research reports on the non-market components of a multinational firm. PREREQUISITE    This course is restricted to students enrolled in the third- and fourth-year of their program.
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COMM-376*/0.5 Business in the Asia-Pacific Rim
When Canadian businesspeople enter the Asia-Pacific Rim countries, they must realize that the laws, customs, business practices, socio-political infrastructure etc. are markedly different from those in Canada. The objective of this course is to identify such differences and to analyze and predict the influences of different socio-cultural and political norms and values on international business operations and business decision-making. PREREQUISITE    Admission restricted to third- and fourth-year students.
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COMM-381*/0.5 Business Law I
Since legal considerations enter into nearly all business transactions and influence most important managerial decisions, owners and managers of business firms make their economic choices and take actions within the general framework of law and jurisprudence. While government and business exert a powerful influence on each other, the judge-made common laws of contract is the basic law governing not only business activities but dealing between persons in society. This course will explore the Canadian legal infrastructure and context, and the laws of tort and contract – the two most important private law doctrines.  Students will not only learn a cursory understanding of the law, but also a framework for solving legal problems as business people or professionals. This course is one of the Canadian Institute for Chartered Accountants Education Requirements. PREREQUISITE    This course is restricted to students enrolled in the third- and fourth-year of their program.
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COMM-382*/0.5 Business Law II
Expanding upon material from Business Law I, this course concerns the law relating to specific business activities and relationships, including agency, employment law, bailment, sale of goods, insurance, ownership and possession of land, negotiable instruments and creditor-debtor relationships. PREREQUISITE    COMM 381*. Admission restricted to third- and fourth-year students.
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COMM-384*/0.5 The Collective Agreement and its Administration
This course examines the content and administration of a collective agreement, including the settlement of disputes that arise while a collective agreement is in effect. The course will emphasize the arbitration process, and will utilize cases and role playing to illustrate typical arbitration problems. As a part of the course, student teams will present legal argument before a professional arbitrator in a mock arbitration. PREREQUISITE    COMM 180*. Admission restricted to third- and fourth-year students.
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COMM-387*/0.5 The Behavioural Study of Unions
“Unions are fascinating organizations and contrary to what the prophets of doom would have us believe, they will not vanish in the near future.” The aim of this course is to examine why people vote for and join unions, why they become committed to unions, why they choose to participate in unions, and sometimes choose to decertify unions. The roles of national and local leaders will be examined, as will the effects of unions on organizational functioning (e.g., productivity and performance, job security, absenteeism, turnover, and job satisfaction). The extent to which unions meet the needs of women, part-times, and contingent workers will be considered. The impact of the changing economic and social environmental on the policies and strategies of the unions including the labour movement’s response to globalization. PREREQUISITE    COMM 151*† or COMM 251*. Admission restricted to third- and fourth-year students.
† Open only to students enrolled in the School of Business.
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COMM-390*/0.5 Developing Information Systems
This course covers the topic of information systems development and integration in organizations. All organizations require Information Systems in order to conduct and manage their day-to-day operations. For many organizations, the successful development and implementation of these systems is crucial to obtaining and sustaining competitive advantage. Therefore, a substantial understanding of how information systems are build for organizations is extremely important. Whether your interests are in accounting, marketing, finance, HR, or particularly in consulting, operations or IT, this course will provide you with the knowledge and tools that will make a difference to you both early in your career and as you move into senior management positions. This course, building upon the foundation of COMM 190*, will focus on the skills and tools needed to effectively and efficiently analyze, design, build and implement Information Systems. PREREQUISITE    COMM 190*, or COMM 200* and CISC 124*, or permission of the instructor. Not open to students who have taken COMM 191*.   
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COMM-392*/0.5 Database Design and Management
This course introduces students to the fundamentals of database management in organizations. It presents the basic concepts and definitions that are required to understand the role of data and information in the modern organization. Various data models are presented, paying particular attention to the relational model. Emphasis is placed on the application and development of those models through the development of a small database system. Management issues such as database reliability and security as well as database and the Internet will also be covered. PREREQUISITE    COMM 190*, or COMM 200* and CISC 124*, or permission of the instructor.
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COMM-395*/0.5 IS Strategy - Maximizing the Business Value
This course examines the issues involved in managing the Information System (IS) function and investment decisions within organizations such that the organization receives the best possible benefit. It is a general course suited to any business student interested in learning about managing IS activities and maximizing the business value from these activities, as well as a capstone course for those students specializing in MIS. Topics vary somewhat from year to year but typically include IS governance, IS architecture, IS investment decisions, managing IS projects and portfolios of projects, and sourcing trends and practices. Case studies, guest speakers and projects are used to highlight issues regarding the practice of IS management. PREREQUISITE    COMM 190*, or COMM 200* and CISC 124*, or permission of the instructor.
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COMM-407*/0.5 Critical Perspectives on Business
Much business education assumes that the market model produces positive outcomes, reflected in an ever expanding range of goods and services available to all. This course questions conventional business assumptions about self-regulating markets and the corporations that dominate them. It challenges students to rethink basic assumptions, asking (with a nod to a former General Motors CEO) "If it’s good for business, is really good for society?" We’ll use Karl Polanyi’s model of the double movement to examine the tensions between free markets and society as a whole. This provocative course incorporates environmental and class-based critiques, examining supermarkets, Bhopal, Westray, liberalism, globalization, drive-thrus, Wal-Mart, and the Cree hunters of northern Quebec. PREREQUISITE    This course is restricted to students enrolled in the third or fourth year of their program.
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COMM-408*/0.5 Sustainability Strategies and Practices
This course, open to third and fourth-year students from all Faculties and Schools at Queen’s, focuses on the functions and responsibilities of managers at all levels to develop effective sustainability practices. Students will be part of an interdisciplinary team that will choose projects to present to the class on (a) innovative approaches to sustainability problems and (b) applying sustainability practices to an organization of their choice. Guest lecturers' handon experiences with sustainability, and tours of sustainability applications in the community. Emphasis will be placed on transferable skills in assessing, promoting, and achieving sustainable practices for organizations of all sizes that will be useful regardless of Faculty, School or discipline. PREREQUISITE    This course is restricted to students enrolled in the third or fourth year of their program.
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