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Graduate Studies Programs of Study Education


Education
Dean
Luce-Kapler, R.
 
Associate Dean of Graduate Studies
Klinger, D.A.
 
Professor
Bruno-Jofré, R.3, Cheng, L., Freeman, J.1, Hill, A.M.3 Klinger, D.A.,  Luce-Kapler, R., Myers, M.J., Russell, T.L.,  Upitis, R.B., Wade-Woolley, L.
 
Associate Professor
Berg, D., Bolden, B.,Burney, S., Chin, P., Christou, T.2, Colgan, L.3, DeLuca, C., Elliott, S.,  Kutsyuruba, B., Lee, E.1, MacEachren, E.,  Sharka wy, A.
 
Assistant Professor
Cooper, A., Morcom, L., Pyper, J., Reeve, R.
 
Adjunct Associate
Martin, A.K.
 
Professor Emeritus
Hutchinson, N., King, A.J.C., Kirby, J.R., Lewis, M.A., Munby, H., O'Farrell, L., Olson, J.K., Rees, R., Shulha, L., Smithrim, K., Welch, M., Wilson, R. 
 
Cross-Appointed
Babbitt, S.E., Bakhurst, D., Butler, B.E., Côté, J.Duffin, J.M., Frederickson, K., Green, M.F., Lam, P., Lamb, R., Levine-Rasky, C.Stockley, D.,Taylor, P.D., Weisberg, M.A.Williams, T.R.
 
1  On Academic Leave July 2015 - December 2015
2  On Academic Leave July 2015-June 2016
3  On Academic Leave January 2016-June 2016

Facilities
The Faculty of Education is housed on the West Campus in Duncan McArthur Hall. The facility contains extensive resources to support its academic programs. The Centre for Educational Resources includes three major facilities. The Education Library offers an extensive and up-to-date collection of books and periodicals and facilities for the use of non-book materials, including online and CD-ROM indexes and computer software. The Teacher Resource Centre contains a large collection of print and non-print materials that support classroom learning in the Faculty and the Kingston area. E-Services provides students, faculty and staff access to full Internet access, Windows-based and Macintosh computers, a library of educational software and specialized peripherals for art, music, design, and multimedia production.  McArthur Hall also has its own gymnasium for teaching as well as for recreation, laboratories, a drama studio, and a technological education wing.  In addition, the Faculty is proud of its graduate student facility that was designed to promote an active, engaged community, and enhance quality of life for students.  It includes personal and collaborative work areas, specially designed furniture and lighting, a conference room, coffee bar, computers, and printing facilities.
Financial Assistance
Only students who are registered as full-time for the session are eligible for fellowships and other support. Several graduate assistantships are available in the Faculty of Education. In addition to Queen's awards full-time students should be aware of the following sources of financial assistance:
  • Ontario Graduate Scholarship Program
  • Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRCC)
Programs of Study Applications for the M.Ed. and Ph.D. programs should be made in accordance with the general regulations of the School of Graduate Studies.
MASTER OF EDUCATION
The Master of Education program is designed to develop in its graduates leadership abilities that emerge from critical enquiry including critical reflection, and research and development activity.
 
Each student is assigned to a program advisor whose responsibilities include developing with the student a program of study that coheres with the student's professional goals and with the program's aims.
 
The program consists of a minimum credit value of ten half courses. Students select one of two program patterns (see Structure of Graduate Degree Programs). A student's registration must be approved by the assigned Program Advisor, the Associate Dean of Graduate Studies, and the School of Graduate Studies. 
 
Admission Requirements
To be considered for admission to the Master of Education program, applicants must provide evidence of:
i Professional experience, a B.Ed. degree or its equivalent, and a minimum of a B- average in a Bachelor's degree or its equivalent.
or
ii Two years professional or industrial experience, and a minimum of a B- average in a Bachelor's Honours degree or its equivalent.
or
iii A B.Ed. degree, and a minimum of a mid-B average in a Bachelor's degree or its equivalent.
iv Applicants whose native languages do not include English must obtain a score of 580 or more on the Test of English as a Foreign Language.
 
Special Admissions Requirements
Each year, up to five full-time students will be admitted who have demonstrated exceptional ability to undertake research. These applicants need not have professional teaching experience, nor a B.Ed. degree, but must possess a record of high academic achievement in an Honours degree or its equivalent, and must present courses that constitute preparation for research in education. Prior to admission, applicants in this category must develop a program of study, in Pattern I (thesis route), with a member of Graduate Faculty. The program of study may require more than the normal ten half-courses, and may include courses from other programs of the Faculty of Education. The program of study must be approved by the Graduate Studies and Research Committee of the Faculty of Education before the application can be approved. Persons who are uncertain if they are eligible for admission to the M.Ed. program are encouraged to contact the Graduate Studies and Research Office at the Faculty of Education.
 
Fields of Study
Students may choose courses from any of the following three fields of study: Curriculum Studies, Cognitive Studies, and Cultural and Policy Studies.  Course work emphasizes research and the application of knowledge to teaching and learning.  Students develop a strong scholarly knowledge base.
 
Curriculum Studies includes the exploration of all aspects of curriculum, including the intended curriculum, the enacted curriculum, the learned curriculum, and the relationships among these constituents of curriculum.
 
Cognitive Studies examines the psychological foundations of human learning and development. The domain encompasses both the mental processes of the individual learner and the situated contexts of learning. It focuses on processes by which people learn to think, reason, solve problems, and make meanings.
 
Cultural and Policy Studies examines, from a critical perspective, the implications of the social, cultural, philosophical, historical and political contexts for education, in its broadest sense, and for institutional policies and practices.
 
Program Patterns
Pattern I: A minimum of six half courses (two must be research courses) and a master's thesis (credit value four half courses).
Pattern II: A minimum of eight half courses (one must be a research course) and a master's project (credit value two half courses).
 
A colloquium must be held before the student begins work on the thesis.
 
With the approval of the program advisor, the Associate Dean of Graduate Studies and, where applicable, the thesis or project supervisor, a student may:
 
a) be required to take additional courses from either the graduate offerings of the Faculty of Education, or undergraduate/graduate offerings of the University in support of the thesis (EDUC-899) or project (EDUC-898).
 
b) be permitted to take up to two half courses from graduate or advanced undergraduate courses offered by other departments of the University.
 

b) Thesis and Project Preparation:
EDUC-890
*, EDUC-892*, EDUC-894*, EDUC-895*, EDUC-896*.

c) Thesis and Project:
EDUC-898 , EDUC-899 .
 
Additional Regulations

1. Advanced credit may be granted for up to two graduate half courses taken at another university provided that the courses cohere with the student's program of study, and provided that the request for advance credit is made at the time of application. In no case will credit be granted for courses, which have been credited to another degree or diploma.


2. Full-time students are required to be on campus for three academic terms (usually Fall, Winter, Spring/Summer).
Part-time students are required to attend classes at the Queen's campus for at least one academic term (usually Summer). [Part-time students may register in no more than one half course in each of the Fall and Winter Terms.]  No student may register in more than two half courses in the Summer Term.

3. The total number of half courses taken by a student from outside the offerings of the Queen's M.Ed. program may not normally exceed two. 

4. Normally, full-time students can anticipate needing between eighteen and twenty-four months in order to complete the degree. Most full-time students will find it possible to complete all course work within the three terms of their full-time year, and to have begun work on the thesis or project. Thesis or project work can be completed in additional terms either on-campus or off-campus. All students are required to complete the degree requirements within five years of initial registration. The minimum period of completion of the courses necessary for graduation is 12 months for full-time students and 24 – 28 months (dependent upon choice of a Master's thesis or Master's project) for part-time students.

5. Further regulations are published in Graduate Studies in Education: A Handbook.

MASTER OF EDUCATION IN ABORIGINAL AND WORLD INDIGENOUS EDUCATION STUDIES (AWIES)

This is a part-time blended (on-line and on-campus) program in the field of Aboriginal and World Indigenous Educational Studies, which is intended for students with experience in Aboriginal communities. It is designed to develop in its graduates, leadership abilities and theoretical, practical and experiential knowledge. It is directed at increasing research and development capabilities in education, in the community, and its leaders. The program parallels the general M.Ed. but courses are geared specifically to Aboriginal and World Indigenous contexts.  Each student is assigned to a program advisor whose responsibilities include developing with the student a program of study that coheres with the student's professional goals and with the program's aims.

The program consists of a minimum credit value of ten half courses. Students select one of two program patterns (see Structure of Graduate Degree Programs). A student's registration must be approved by the assigned Program Advisor, the Associate Dean of Graduate Studies, and the School of Graduate Studies.

Admission Requirements

To be considered for admission to the Master of Education AWIES program, applicants must provide evidence of:

i. Professional experience in Aboriginal and/or world indigenous education or related field, a B.Ed. degree or its equivalent, and a minimum of a B- average in a Bachelor's degree or its equivalent;OR

ii. Two years professional experience in Aboriginal and/or world indigenous education or a related field, and a minimum of a B- average in a Bachelor's Honours degree or its equivalent; OR

iii. A B.Ed. degree and a background in Aboriginal and/or world indigenous issues, and a minimum of a mid-B average in a Bachelor's degree or its equivalent; OR

iv. Demonstrated significant professional experience in Aboriginal and/or world indigenous education or related field, and a minimum of a mid-B average in a Bachelor's degree or its equivalent.

In addition to the above, an applicant must submit two letters of support from respected members of the applicant's Aboriginal or world indigenous community to which they either belong or are related. Since preference will be given to qualified applicants of Aboriginal ancestry (Status, non-Status, Métis, Inuit) applicants may be requested to provide proof of Aboriginal ancestry where applicable. Documentation which provides proof of Aboriginal ancestry may include: a status card, church records, a Métis card, a verification letter from an official Political Territorial Organization (PTO) or First Nations.

Applicants whose native languages do not include English must obtain a score of 580 or more on the Test of English as a Foreign Language.

Probationary status may be applicable for candidates who do not meet the admission requirements as described above. A description of this status can be found in the School of Graduate Studies calendar online at:

http://queensu.ca/calendars/sgsr/Graduate_Student.html

Program Patterns

Pattern I: A minimum of six half courses (two must be research courses), and a master's thesis (credit value four half-courses).

Pattern II: A minimum of eight half courses (one must be a research course), and a master's project (credit value two half-courses).

With the approval of the program advisor, the Associate Dean of Graduate Studies and, where applicable, the thesis or project supervisor, a student may:

a) be required to take additional courses from either the graduate offerings of the Faculty of Education, or undergraduate/graduate offerings of the University in support of the thesis (EDUC-899) or project (EDUC-898).

b) be permitted to take up to two half courses from graduate (or advanced undergraduate) courses offered by other departments of the University, another university, or the general M.Ed. program with the approval of the advisor, and the Associate Dean of Graduate Studies.

Courses by Component

A. Aboriginal and World Indigenous Educational Studies: EDUC-870*, EDUC-871*, EDUC-874*, EDUC-877*, EDUC-878*.

B. Thesis and Project Preparation: EDUC-872*, EDUC-875*, EDUC-876*.

C. Thesis and Project: EDUC-898, EDUC-899.

Additional Regulations

  1. Advanced credit may be granted for up to two graduate half courses taken at another university provided that the courses cohere with the student's program of study, and provided that the request for advance credit is made at the time of application. In no case will credit be granted for courses, which have been credited to another degree or diploma.
  2. Part-time students are normally required to attend classes at the Queen's campus for at least one academic term (usually Summer). [Part-time students may register in no more than one half course in each of the Fall and Winter Terms. No student may register in more than two half courses in the Summer Term.
  3. The total number of half courses taken by a student from outside the offerings of the Queen's M.Ed. AWIES program may not normally exceed two.
  4. All students are required to complete the degree requirements within five years of initial registration. The minimum period of completion of the courses necessary for graduation is 24 – 28 months (dependent upon choice of a Master's thesis or Master's project.
  5. Further regulations are published in Graduate Studies in Education: A Handbook.
DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY (Ph.D.)

The program of study leading to the Ph.D. in Education is designed to educate researchers and professionals to address critical educational issues within and beyond the traditional formal school systems; to educate these researchers and professionals from an integrated and interdisciplinary perspective through participation in on-going research programs; and to provide these researchers and professionals with the scholarly, methodological, and critical knowledge and skills to conduct original research in education.

Admission requirements 

Admission to the Doctor of Philosophy in Education program is based upon completion of a Master’s degree in Education or equivalent advanced-level credential with first class standing (A- or 80% or higher ) at a recognized university. Professional experience in education or a related field is an asset.

Applicants are required to submit a brief research proposal (one to two pages maximum), and to contact one or two potential academic supervisors to obtain confirmation that he/she is willing to supervise their work if they apply for admission and receive an offer of admission. 

Applicants whose native languages do not include English must obtain a passing score in one of the accepted tests of English language proficiency. Information can be found can be found  in the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies here: International Students.

Promotion from the M.Ed. program in the Faculty of Education at Queen’s University to the Ph.D. in Education program may be considered under exceptional circumstances. If you are interested in this option, you are encouraged to contact the Faculty’s Associate Dean of Graduate Studies and Research. Additional information about this option can be found  in the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies here: Academic Qualifications for Admission.

Fields of Study

The program has six fields: Curriculum Theorizing; Educational Studies; Learning and Cognition; Literacy Education; Measurement, Assessment, Policy, Leadership, Evaluation (MAPLE); and Special Education. The description of each field is as follows:
 
Curriculum Theorizing: Curriculum theorizing is an inquiry into the social, contextual, and historical facets of teaching and learning. This field extends beyond teaching disciplines and formalized curriculum mandates to explore the conditions that influence the practices of teaching and the emergence of learning. Curriculum theorizing scholars are engaged in curriculum research across a variety of teaching and learning contexts, both school-based and non-school-based, and across the lifespan.
 
Educational Studies: This field affords doctoral students the opportunity to work with faculty who are experts in subject disciplines (e.g. Mathematics, History or English education) or Educational Foundations (e.g. Educational Philosophy, Social Contexts).
 
Literacy Education: This field addresses learners’ reading and writing, both in first and subsequent languages. It has components in educational psychology, curriculum, and language assessment. Research foci include cognitive processes in reading, reading development, and writing.
 
Learning and Cognition: This field concerns educational psychology. Current research foci of the researchers involved include learning and development, motivation, social cognition, individual differences in ability, health-related issues, and cognitive processes in learning.
 
Measurement, Assessment, Policy, Leadership, Evaluation (MAPLE): There is a critical need for educational policy and decision making to be evidence informed. MAPLE represents faculty members who focus on applied inquiry and research related to student, professional and organizational learning and capacity building. More specifically, we are concerned with the measurement of educational outcomes; student growth, assessment, and achievement; policy studies and policy-making; leadership and governance, knowledge translation and mobilization; collaborative inquiry; and, program evaluation for development, improvement, accountability and decision making. Our work explores the meaning of individual, group, classroom, school, and system level data as these are interpreted within political, organizational and cultural contexts in Canada and internationally.
 
Special Education: This field concerns the application of psychological principles to the education of learners with exceptional needs in inclusive settings. Current research foci of the researchers involved include learning disabilities/dyslexia, mathematical disabilities/dyscalculia, and creating appropriate contexts for learners with special education needs.
 
Program of Study
This program is fundamentally a full-time program; therefore, registered students are expected to pay full-time fees for the duration of their program (see Requirements for Degree Programs).  An academic year consists of three terms, which are fall, winter, and spring/summer.   All doctoral students registering initially as a full-time student, must pay full-time fees at least for the first six terms, whatever their registration status.  After that time the Faculty and the School of Graduate Studies will consider applications for a transfer from full-time to part-time status for reasons such as (1) the student has an opportunity for full-time professional employment or (2) there has been a change in the student’s personal circumstances that prevent his/her studies from being pursued on a full-time basis (see Transfers from Full-Time to Part-Time Status).
 
All students will be required to meet regularly with their supervisor, and to maintain appropriate levels of communication in order to maintain sufficient academic progress.
The minimum time to complete the Ph.D. in Education program is nine academic terms. Students normally take courses for the first two years, at the end of which they complete their comprehensive examination and write their thesis proposal.  It is expected that many full-time students will complete their degree requirements within four years.  All students are required to complete the degree within seven years of initial registration. 

Students will follow a program with the following components:
 
Coursework
Students must complete five graduate courses, which includes EDUC-900*. The four other required courses vary by field. Courses are to be selected in consultation with the student’s supervisor and with the approval of the Faculty’s Associate Dean of Graduate Studies and Research. Students are encouraged to take one graduate course in another department, and may be required by their supervisory committee to take further courses beyond the five normally required.
 
Personal Program Plan
In conjunction with their supervisory committee, students will compile a personal program plan of appropriate research and development goals and these will be tracked through the Annual Ph.D. Progress Report Form.
 
Comprehensive Examination
The comprehensive examination will comprise a set of two tasks. It is expected that these tasks will be completed within the two terms following the completion of the student’s final required course. The first task will be negotiated among the student, the supervisory committee, and the Associate Dean of Graduate Studies. It will take the form of one of the following: (a) the writing of a literature review on one or more specified topics; (b) the novel analyses of existing data or consideration of methodological issues; or (c) a grant proposal on one or more specified topics. For the second task each student will submit a dissertation proposal. Following submission of this proposal, an oral candidacy exam will be held. Both the written proposal and the student’s competency at the oral candidacy exam will be evaluated for this task. All parts of the examination will be marked by the supervisory committee.

Dissertation

The dissertation research must be original and contribute to knowledge in the field. The defense of the dissertation will be an oral examination conducted according to the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies (see Thesis). 


 
GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN PROFESSIONAL INQUIRY (GDPI)

The Graduate Diploma in Professional Inquiry (GDPI) addresses the inquiry skills fundamental to quality professional thinking and action. Specifically, the GDPI curriculum is designed to improve professional problem solving and decision-making processes at the individual, team, program, classroom and organizational levels. Currently in Education, as in other professions, there is an emphasis on evidence-informed decision making. Inquiry practices are the processes used to guide such an approach.

Admission Requirements

Admission requirements for students entering the diploma program are consistent with those set by the School of Graduate Studies and will include:

  • A baccalaureate degree from a recognized university
  • Graduation with a B- graduating average or higher (70% graduating average or a ranking in the top third of the graduating class where number grades are not available)
  • Under exceptional circumstances, consideration will be given to highly motivated individuals with relevant field experience who do not meet the B- requirement
  • A statement of interest in the program will be required in order to ensure alignment of the applicant’s academic background, work experience, and career aspirations with the objectives of the program
  • Applicants whose native languages do not include English must obtain a minimum English language requirement of 580 or higher on the paper-based TOEFL exam; 237 Computer-based; 88 on the TOEFL iBT test or IELTS Band 7 or higher.
PROFESSIONAL MASTER OF EDUCATION DEGREE (PME)

The Professional Master of Education Degree (PME) is a part-time, course-based graduate program and is part of the Faculty of Education’s laddered-credential online program. This degree is anchored in and extends from the widespread need for professionals to conduct quality systematic inquiry for evidence-informed decision-making. Students will be required to draw from their professional experience to engage with the research literature in their area of concentration. 

Students may apply for direct entry into the PME or after completion of the Graduate Diploma in Professional Inquiry. Students who successfully complete this five-course diploma will be eligible to receive credit in the PME and will advance directly to the other requirements of the PME, notably to enrol in a PME concentration, choosing from one of five: Aboriginal Education, Assessment and Evaluation, Classroom Specialist, Education Abroad, and Literacy Education. Each five-course concentration focuses on developing expertise and leadership through field-based, professional inquiry aimed at improving teaching and learning.

Admission Requirements: Direct Entry into the PME

Admission requirements for direct entry will include the following:

  • A baccalaureate degree from a recognized university
  • Graduation with a B- graduating average or higher (70% graduating average or a ranking in the top third of the graduating class where number grades are not available)
  • Under exceptional circumstances, consideration will be given to highly motivated individuals with relevant field experience who do not meet the B- requirement
  • A statement of interest in the program will be required in order to ensure alignment of the applicant’s academic background, work experience, and career aspirations with the objectives of the program
  • Applicants whose native languages do not include English must obtain a minimum English language requirement of 580 or higher on the paper-based TOEFL exam; 237 Computer-based; 88 on the TOEFL iBT test or IELTS Band 7 or higher.

Admission Requirements: From the GDPI

Admission requirements for students who have completed the GDPI at Queen's University are:

  • Successful completion of the GDPI at Queen’s University with a minimum of a B- graduating average or higher.
  • Applicants must apply for admission to the PME within five years after completing the GDPI although the Associate Dean of Graduate Studies and Research may waive this requirement in exceptional circumstances.

Areas of Concentration
(Required Course for all concentrations)
Organizational Leadership: This course provides an overview of theories of leadership and an evolution of the practices of leadership within organizations in general and educational institutions in particular. Participants will examine the social and cultural construction of leadership, will gain an understanding of the range of roles and responsibilities that a leader has within an organization; will apply effectively selected leadership skills and processes; and will develop conceptual frameworks to understand behaviours within the organization.

Students will choose from one of the following concentrations:

Aboriginal Education: The Aboriginal Education concentration will focus on (a) Ways of Knowing: Aboriginal Knowledge in the Classroom (b) Policy and Models in Canadian Aboriginal Education, and (c) Aboriginal Languages and Language Teaching.  As a set these themes examine approaches to education, leadership, and knowledge from the perspective of culture-based education; the policies that have and continue to shape Aboriginal education in Canada; and, the diversity and current status of the Aboriginal Languages of the Americas. Understanding how a cultural lens contributes to an individual’s ‘coming to know’ is a relevant for teachers and leaders working in every school system and multi-cultural organization. In support of their learning, Ways of Knowing will be offered as an elective for students enrolled in other concentrations.

Assessment and Evaluation: The practices of assessment and evaluation lead to judgments about performance that ultimately inform decision-making. In assessment, these judgments are typically about learning and achievement; in evaluation they focus on program merit, worth, significance and value.  As a set, the themes structuring this concentration target three different contexts in which data must be collected, analyzed and acted upon. The focus across themes is how to optimize the accuracy, adequacy, and utility of these judgements and subsequent decisions. This concentration will focus on (a) Planning and Implementing Effective Classroom Assessment, (b) Using Classroom and Large-Scale Assessment Data, and (c) Conducting Quality Program Evaluations. Given the relevance of assessment and evaluation across school and organizational contexts, all of these themes will be offered as electives for students enrolled in other concentrations.

Classroom Specialist: Classroom specialists focus their attention on the decisions that foster quality teaching and learning processes. They assume that their own decisions about how, when, and where to learn, in large part, shape the meaning students take from planned educational experiences. This concentration will focus on (a) Innovative Curriculum Planning, (b) The Connected Classroom, and (c) Critical and Creative Thinking. As a set, these themes invite classroom teachers to reflect on their own practices and be proactive in continuously improving the frameworks, contexts and outcomes for learning. Given that each theme is relevant to teachers of all subjects and grade levels, all of these themes will be offered as electives for students enrolled in other concentrations.

Literacy Education: Literacy in its broadest sense is the foundation for learning. Literacy allows us to acquire and exchange knowledge and to make sense of and communicate our experiences and is thus at the heart of formal schooling. This concentration will examine three important dimensions of literacy (a) Theoretical and Historical Foundations, (b) Component Skills, and (c) Effective Intervention. As a set, these themes invite classroom teachers to examine perspectives on how learners become literate, the complex mental functioning required for literacy and how teachers can target and support the development of these functions. Because literacy underpins achievement across the curriculum and needs to be reinforced, at least informally, by all teachers, Theoretical and Historical Foundations has been designed to also be an elective in support of classroom teachers and instructional leaders.

Education Abroad: Education Abroad will examine three ways that individuals explore both place and space to build an effective and successful teaching career: (a) Culture, Curriculum and Pedagogy, (b) Approaches to Professional Learning, and (c) Professional Community Membership. As a set, these themes invite current or prospective overseas teachers to understand and participate in the spectrum of learning opportunities available to them from their unique standpoint.  While Education Abroad implies the relocation of the teachers, more and more teachers in domestic settings are encountering students who themselves have been relocated. The study of Culture, Curriculum and Pedagogy has been designed as an appropriate elective for teachers interested in examining how their current orientations to teaching and learning may or may not be inviting to learners from diverse backgrounds.    

Graduate Studies Programs of Study Education
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