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School of Graduate Studies
2014-2015 Academic Year
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Graduate Studies Courses of Instruction English Language and Literature


English Language and Literature
Full courses designated as Studies and half courses designated as Topics offer the study of a single work, a group of related works, an author or authors within the period or grouping indicated. The content of these offerings will vary from year to year. Not all the courses listed below will be offered in any one year, and a few are offered infrequently. A list of expected offerings with detailed description of course contents will be sent to applicants as soon as it can be drawn up.
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ENGL-800* Introduction to Professional and Pedagogical Skills I
This course introduces M.A. students to the scholarly study and teaching of English literature. The emphasis will be on training Teaching Assistants. There will be practical training in research skills, essay-marking, the academic counselling of students, and first-time teaching. There will also be some consideration of academic and non-academic careers for M.A.'s. Three term-hours; fall. S. McKegney. This course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis.
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ENGL-802* Practical Criticism
This course will provide students with the necessary tools to practice and to teach "close reading" in a broad range of genres from different historical and national contexts.  Students will engage in textual analysis through a series of practical exercises combined with readings of critical essays representing different approaches to the reading of literature.  Not offered 2014-15.
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ENGL-803* Research Forum I
A regularly scheduled forum in which faculty, advanced doctoral students, and visiting scholars present model research problems and methodologies for discussion. Attendance is required.Graded on a Pass/Fail basis. Various speakers.
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ENGL-810 Literary Criticism
Representative critical approaches from Aristotle to the moderns will be considered with particular attention to those which have most influenced contemporary attitudes. Not offered 2014-15.
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ENGL-811* Literary Theory I
"Signs of the Times"- Theory, Text, Event This course considers a random sampling of essays from leading critical/theoretical/public journals and magazines over the last decade or so to elaborate the temper of the times and to reflect on the future of thought, both academic and public, in Anglo-American, Australian, some Caribbean, Asian and African, and Canadian national cultures. Students fluent in languages other than English will be encouraged to interject news from academic and public cultures in Quebec, multicultural or indigenous Canada or Spanish-speaking US, Europe, Asia and Africa, and the Americas more broadly speaking. The aims of this course are both tangible and intangible: to foster erudition rather than narrow specialization, to acquaint students with the broad scope of debates in their fields and disciplines so that they recognize what their place and perspective might be, to take seriously funding agencies' demand that scholarship demonstrate its relevance and desire for socio-cultural transformation, to ponder the implications of what it means to be a public intellectual or what commitment, soul-making, and vision might mean, and to encounter models of exercises in imagination, dissent, original research, and innovative methodology that interrogate and alter the world as we know it and which students can both emulate and reinvent. This course takes “the essay as form” seriously. Academic journals from which some required readings are likely to be taken are New Literary History, Critical Inquiry, boundary2, Social Text, Public Culture, Dark Matters, Cultural Politics, Angelaki, Constellations, Journal of Visual Culture, Genders, Modernism/Modernity, Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies, Australian Literary Studies, Nineteenth-Century Contexts, University of Toronto Quarterly, Mosaic, PMLA, Exemplaria, Vectors, The Eighteenth Century: Theory and Interpretation, and so on. Essays in the public sphere could come from magazines, newspapers, and books, underground, overground, and somewhere in between. Apart from the grade assigned to participation, evaluation will be based on two assignments. The short assignment will be an exercise in emulation that highlights the methodology, style, and voice of the student’s favourite essay on the course while addressing different subject matter. The favourite essay on the course could be the one that inspires students most or that offends, angers, or provokes them most. The final essay for this course moves from emulation to invention, pursuing “roads not taken” in the required readings in the context of a chosen historical/literary field and preferred disciplinary discourse and method. Three term-hours; fall. A. Varadharajan.
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ENGL-812* Literary Theory II
Not offered 2014-15.
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ENGL-813* Literary Theory III
Not offered 2014-15.
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ENGL-815* Topics in Literary Study I
Not offered 2014-15.
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ENGL-816* Topics in Literary Study II

Topic: Academic Web Design—Principles and Practice

The internet is increasingly indispensable to our scholarly work both as researchers and as teachers; however, designing academic web sites poses challenges that are generally not addressed by our graduate training. This course is aimed at students interested in exploring ways in which the web can be integrated into teaching and research, and in getting hands-on experience of site design. It is primarily aimed at students with little or no experience in web design, but students with intermediate or advanced skills are also welcome. This course will introduce students to the basic skills necessary to design and create an academic web site. I will offer advice and some practical assistance, but for the most part students will learn by doing. Shared experience and collective problem-solving are key parts of real-life web design, so students can expect to work both independently and in collaboration. Class time will be devoted to specific design fundamentals and basic technologies: HTML5, CSS, Javascript, but not PHP, ASP, JSP, or MySQL. We will also investigate what makes academic web sites distinct from commercial, governmental, or personal sites, and how those differences affect design. The rapidly evolving copyright regime in which our intellectual lives are increasingly lived, both on- and offline, will also be an important topic of conversation. No prior acquaintance with medieval literature or with web design is required. Designing a good web site requires an array of skills, including research, writing and editing, page layout, graphic design, and coding, so even those with minimal computing skills will have valuable contributions to offer. Students can expect to come away from this course with a good grasp of the design process as a whole, and solid experience in one or two areas of that process. Requirements: Seminar participation (5%), design exercises (10%), written assignment (25%), web site (60%). Three term-hours; fall. S. Straker.

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ENGL-817* Topics in Literary Studies III

Topic: Publishing Practicum

Description: This seminar takes students through revision and submission stages from draft essay to article publication. The first section of the course will be devoted to discussion of the differences between coursework papers and published articles, and to a presentation and peer revision cycle of each student’s work. The second section of the course will discuss how to decide where to send article submissions, how to present them, and what to expect of the process. If there is time, we will build in a conference proposal/presentation stage. Students must have a complete draft essay to bring to the start of the course and be ready to welcome reading and response from peers. Success in the course requires regular attendance, constructive participation, revision responsive to instructor and peer review, and submission to an appropriate scholarly venue for publication. Note: Doctoral students are strongly urged to enroll in this course, and while the course is open to all students, doctoral students will have enrolment priority. Three term-hours; winter. G. Willmott

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ENGL-818* Topics in Literary Study IV

Topic: The Art of Comics

Description: This course studies the history and aesthetics of comics, both as a changing art form and as a heterogeneous cultural institution. The first half of the course will survey this tradition from the modernist period to the present, encompassing such genres as the newspaper strip, the comic book, underground comix, and the graphic novel. The focus here will be on the American industry, but with reference to others, and on the formal analysis of comics. The second half of the course will study a range of contemporary comics artists, with special consideration for Canadian creators. The plan of the course is intended to provide an open framework to which students may bring, or within which they may explore and develop, their own generic, national, ideological, or other interests out of the very great variety of comics creation. Hence the second half of the course will itself be divided into study of works selected by the instructor (see syllabus below) and works selected and presented by students according to their own developing interests. The latter may delve further into the syllabus or range more widely, taking in contemporary strips, comics from around the world (e.g. European or Japanese: Hergé, Satrapi, Miyazaki, etc.), digital comics, and film animation. Three term-hours; winter. G. Willmott.

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ENGL-819* Introduction to Bibliography
Not offered 2014-15.
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ENGL-820 Anglo-Saxon and Beowulf
Not offered 2014-15.
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ENGL-821* Topics in Anglo-Saxon Literature I
Not offered 2014-15.
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ENGL-822 Old Norse
Not offered 2014-15.
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ENGL-823 Studies in Medieval Literature
Not offered 2014-15.
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ENGL-824* Topics in Medieval Literature I
Not offered 2014-15.
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ENGL-825* Topics in Medieval Literature II

Topic: The Morality Play in the Medieval and Tudor Periods

Description: This course will examine the development of the morality play from the earliest recorded instance in the fourteenth century to the flowering of the genre in the later medieval and Tudor periods in the context of the changing religious and political culture of this time. Plays to be read include The Pride of Life, Wisdom, Mankind, Everyman, The Castle of Perseverance, The Satire of the Three Estates, Magnificence, Wit and Science, and King John. At the conclusion of the course, the class will present a reading of a play or of a portion of a play. All plays will be read in the original Middle English or Middle Scots, but students will receive help and instruction in acquiring the skills needed to read and pronounce the language. Requirements: Essay: 45%; class presentation: 20%; performance / play reading project: 15%; class participation: 20%. Three term-hours; winter. R. Wehlau.

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ENGL-826* Topics in Medieval Literature III
Not offered 2014-15.
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ENGL-827* Topics in Medieval Literature IV
Not offered 2014-15.
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ENGL-828* Chaucer
Not offered 2014-15.
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ENGL-830 Studies in Early Modern Literature and Culture
Not offered 2014-15.
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ENGL-831* Topics in Early Modern Literature and Culture I

Topic: Early Modern Political Theatre: The English History Play

Description: In this course we will consider the Elizabethan history play as a form of political theatre, a representation that intervenes in public life by inviting onlookers to engage with political questions and thus to simultaneously occupy the positions of political subject and audience member. Our approach will be twofold, considering both the political ideas and problems presented by the plays, and the difference that it makes when these ideas are presented in the context of the London public theatre of the 1590s. Thus in addition to the plays we will read some political theory and history as well as studying relevant aspects of theatre history and practice. At all times we will be investigating the intersection of the political, the commercial and the theatrical, asking, “What difference did it make to the political culture of England that a company of actors could imitate the actions of kings, their nobility and their people for an audience whose members had paid as little as a penny for the experience?” Three term-hours; winter. E. Hanson

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ENGL-832* Topics in Early Modern Literature and Culture II
Not offered 2014-15.
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ENGL-833* Topics in Early Modern Literature and Culture III
Not offered 2014-15.
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ENGL-834* Topics in Early Modern Literature and Culture IV
Not offered 2014-15.
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ENGL-835* Topics in Early Modern Literature and Culture V
Not offered 2014-15.
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ENGL-836* Topics in Early Modern Literature and Culture VI
Not offered 2014-15.
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ENGL-840 Studies in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature
Not offered 2014-15.
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ENGL-841* Topics in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature I
Not offered 2014-15.
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ENGL-842* Topics in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature II
Not offered 2014-15.
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ENGL-843* Topics in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature III
Not offered 2014-15.
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ENGL-844* Topics in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature IV

Topic: Laurence Sterne in Context

Description: This course will engage with all of Sterne’s works: Tristram Shandy, A Sentimental Journey, The Sermons, and minor writings. Among issues to be considered are Sterne as precursor to the postmodern, as radical or conservative satirist, sentimentalist, Anglican minister, literary celebrity, etc. Approaches from all angles are welcome: theoretical, rhetorical, historical, political, obstetrical, etc. (most of ’em ending, as these do, in ical). Requirements: Contributions to class (including individual close readings), 20%; seminar, 30%; and a 20-page critical essay, 50%. Three term-hours; spring. C. Fanning

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ENGL-850 Studies in Romantic Literature
Not offered 2014-15.
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ENGL-851* Topics in Romanticism I

Topic: Austen and her Contemporaries

Description: This course examines the six published novels of Jane Austen, as well as the novels of some of her major contemporaries. We will read Austen’s novels in the order of their composition (not their publication), setting them both against one another, and against novels such as Ann Radcliffe’s The Italian, Charlotte Dacre’s Zafloya, Maria Edgeworth’s The Absentee, and Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. We will assess the cultural restraints that these women both challenged and exploited, as well as their distinctive responses to issues ranging from romance, taste, and domesticity to class, sexuality, and imperialism. Three term-hours; fall. R. Morrison

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ENGL-852* Topics in Romanticism II
Not offered 2014-15.
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ENGL-853* Topics in Romanticism III
Not offered 2014-15.
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ENGL-854* Topics in Romanticism IV

Topic: The Romantic Sublime

Description: This course examines the use of the sublime in poetry, prose fiction and drama of the Romantic period. We will explore the discussions of the sublime as they emerge and develop through the mid to late eighteenth century, with emphasis on Burke’s Philosophical Enquiry Into The Origin Of Our Ideas Of The Sublime And Beautiful (1759). Poetical texts for study will include individual works by Blake, excerpts from Wordsworth’s Prelude, Shelley’s Prometheus Unbound, and works by Keats. Ann Radcliffe’s The Romance of the Forest and Matthew Lewis’s The Monk will also be included in the course. Three term-hours; winter. J. Pierce

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ENGL-855 Studies in Victorian Literature
Not offered 2014-15.
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ENGL-856* Topics in Victorian Literature I

Topic: Ideology and Identity in British Children’s Literature of the Nineteenth Century

Description: Long referred to as “The Golden Age of Children’s Literature,” the Victorian period expanded and developed the market for books designed specifically for a young audience that had emerged earlier in the century. Many of its classics have become staples in the juvenile canon: Treasure Island remains a perennial favourite, Black Beauty still gallops his way into the hearts of young readers, while the fantastic worlds of Alice in Wonderland and Peter and Wendy continue to delight generation after generation. Still, like all works for children, they reveal especially clearly the cultural imprint of the historical moment of their composition and of their immediate predecessors in the field. This course is designed to introduce students to the wide range of genres developed by Romantic and Victorian children’s authors in the context of the role played by contemporary cultural values and the formation of identity. Requirements:  Seminar: 20%; research paper (15–18 pages including notes and works cited): 50%; participation in a variety of modes (including responses to seminars, general discussion and exemplary attendance): 20%; reader’s journals (4 instalments, no more than 2 single-spaced pages each): 10%. Three term-hours; fall. S. King

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ENGL-857* Topics in Victorian Literature II
Not offered 2014-15.
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ENGL-858* Topics in Victorian Literature III

Topic: Animals and Animality in Victorian Fiction and Culture

Description: This course will read Victorian novels in the framework of critical animal studies. It could be said that our current posthumanism originated in the Victorian critique of species. Charles Darwin’s On the Origin of Species, published mid-century, epitomises and confirms Victorians’ anxieties about the human-animal divide, and fears of human animality, which are explored in various ways in the fiction of the period. We will read modern and contemporary theoretical texts in animal studies, nineteenth-century documents on animal rights, and selected historical studies of human- animal relations. We will also examine a selection of visual representations of animals. Texts will include The Animals Reader, and selections from: Jacques Derrida, The Animal That Therefore I Am (More to Follow); Carol Adams, The Sexual Politics of Meat; Coral Lansbury, The Old Brown Dog; James Turner, Reckoning With the Beast; Charles Darwin, On the Origin of Species. Novels may include: Emily Brontë Wuthering Heights; Anna Sewell, Black Beauty; Anne Brontë The Tenant of Wildfell Hall; Thomas Hardy, Tess of the Durbervilles; Virginia Woolf, Flush; Elizabeth Gaskell, Mary Barton. Evaluation will be based on a seminar presentation, a presentation of a visual image, a term paper, and participation. Three term-hours; winter. M. Berg

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ENGL-859* Topics in Victorian Literature IV
Not offered 2014-15.
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ENGL-860 Studies in Modern and Contemporary Literature and Culture
Not offered 2014-15.
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ENGL-861* Topics in Modernism I
Not offered 2014-15.
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ENGL-862* Topics in Modernism II
Not offered 2014-15.
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ENGL-863* Topics in Modernism III

Topic: Poetry in Crisis, 1798–1935

Description: Stephane Mallarmé declared in the latter nineteenth century, “They have done violence to verse. Governments change: but always prosody remains intact: either, in the revolutions, it passes unnoticed, or the violent attempt upon it does not impose itself because of the opinion that this ultimate dogma can never vary.” Mallarmé’s insights frame the work of poetics in the language of violent crisis and instability, describing the effects of the rise of free verse as an epochal shift in poetic prosody that helped to signal the beginnings of the new avant-garde of modernism. This course will consider the psychological, emotional, and spiritual unrest reflected in poetry’s revolutions of form, subject matter, and aesthetics by reading poetry—and criticism about poetry—through nearly 150 years, from Wordsworth and Coleridge’s 1798 “Preface to Lyrical Ballads” to T. S. Eliot’s post-conversion experiments in Ash-Wednesday (1927) and “Burnt Norton” (1935). Other poets and critics studied may include John Stuart Mill, Matthew Arnold, Walter Pater, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Gerard Manley Hopkins, Emily Dickinson, Thomas Hardy, W.B. Yeats, Sigmund Freud, and Cathy Caruth. Requirements: 4500-word paper (roughly 15 pages), 50%; seminar presentation, 35%; engaged participation and attendance, 15%. Three term-hours; winter. G. McIntire

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ENGL-864* Topics in Modernism IV

Topic: The Literature and Culture of the Spanish Civil War

Description: A study of poems, memoirs, journalism, fiction and other forms of cultural production inspired by the Spanish Civil War (1936–1939). Widely regarded as the opening act of the Second World War (though its veterans were derided as “premature anti-fascists”) the war against Franco’s Fascist-backed coup in Spain inspired volunteers from 53 nations to migrate to that country in support of the cause. As Auden famously put it, they heard the call of Spain “on remote peninsulas, / on sleepy plains, in the aberrant fishermen’s islands…”; they “heard and migrated like gulls or the seeds of a flower…. They floated over the oceans; / They walked the passes: they came to present their lives” (EA 211–12). They did so, however, in what rapidly became a lost cause. This course will examine the literature and culture, primarily but not exclusively in English, inspired by this war. Authors considered will include George Orwell, Nan Green, John Cornford, Margot Heinemann, Tom Wintringham, Jack Lindsay, Ernest Hemingway, Martha Gelhorn, Edwin Rolfe, Langston Hughes, Norman Bethune, Dorothy Livesay and Ted Allen, and we will look at anthologies of elegiac poetry (many no longer in print) from Britain, Canada and the United States. We’ll also pay attention to the small newspapers and literary magazines publishing elegiac tributes to the veterans, most notably the soldiers’ own publication, Volunteer for Liberty. We’ll give some consideration, too, to the visual art inspired by the war (the paintings of Picasso, Miro, and Dali, the documentary photography of Robert Capa), and especially to the much belated memorials produced in memory of the volunteers across Britain, the United States and Canada. Theoretical and historical questions we’ll address include why so much about this war and its volunteer effort has been forgotten by governments and mainstream media; why it has been such an object of nostalgia on the political left; why the critical language devised for the literature of the Great War is so inadequate to account for it; the place of women both in the work of the war and in its iconography; the role of the war in changing the face of journalism and in inspiring a resurgence of certain modernist literary practices rejected by the political left in the 1930s. Three term-hours; spring. P. Rae

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ENGL-865* Topics in Contemporary Literature and Culture I

Topic: Travelling in the Twentieth Century

Description: In Short Voyages to the Land of the People, Jacques Rancière describes the foreigner as an individual who “undoes the certainties of place” and displaces the usual angle of vision; similarly, Edward Said has written of the traveler as someone who suspends routine and “abandons fixed positions.” These are surely optimistic versions of the traveller, at odds with the notion that travel and travel writing are inevitably part and parcel of a colonial enterprise. In these descriptions, s/he is, rather, an individual capable of reworking, undoing, and rewriting. And travel writing itself—as Debbie Lisle has suggested—may therefore be viewed as a genre that possesses an important cosmopolitan or utopian potential, a genre that is well poised to consider the changing landscape of a global world. We will begin our exploration of twentieth-century travel writing with a brief historical overview of the genre and the reading of some classic travel accounts by such writers as Mary Kingsley, Apsley-Cherry Garrard, and J. M. Synge. This will be followed by a consideration of various attempts to rework and question diverse aspects of the genre by contemporary writers, among them Claude Lévi-Strauss, Martha Gellhorn, Julio Cortázar and Carol Dunlop, Robyn Davidson, Raja Shehadeh, Sara Wheeler, Elif Batuman, and Geoff Dyer. Three term-hours; winter. Y. Schlick

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ENGL-866* Topics in Contemporary Literature and Culture II

Topic: International Indigenous Literature: Contemporizing the Traditional

Description: Contemporary Indigenous authors are increasingly including elements of their traditions in their work in order to demonstrate the dynamic and resilient nature of Indigenous cultures. As writers grapple with a legacy of diasporic upheaval, loss, disempowerment, poverty, residential/mission school experiences, and the like, they have begun to consider the nature of benevolent and malevolent forces/action (or in Christian terms “good” and “evil”), using culturally specific epistemological approaches. This seminar will explore how texts across a range of genres from a diversity of Indigenous cultures employ traditional knowledge to facilitate cultural renewal and healing from colonial traumas as they explore the overarching theme of in/human behaviour. In order to do so, we will by necessity examine concerns for land, language, community, ceremony, and storytelling itself, including aesthetics, using a combination of culturally specific and pan-Indigenous approaches. Because Indigenous authors are dealing with on-going issues close to them and their people, their work is provocative, if not often boldly confrontational, and students are therefore expected to come to the class with some basic understanding of European imperialism and the colonial domination of Indigenous peoples. Three term-hours; fall. A. Ruffo

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ENGL-867* Topics in Contemporary Literature and Culture III
Not offered 2014-15.
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ENGL-868* Topics in Contemporary Literature and Culture IV
Not offered 2014-15.
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ENGL-870 Studies in Canadian Literature
Not offered 2014-15.
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ENGL-871* Topics in Canadian Literature I
Not offered 2014-15.
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ENGL-872* Topics in Canadian Literature II
Not offered 2014-15.
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ENGL-873* Topics in Canadian Literature III

Topic: “carrying the burden of peace”: Exploring Indigenous Masculinities through Literature

Description: In the language of the Kanien kehaka or Mohawk, the most common translation for the English word “warrior” is rotiskenhrakete, which means literally “carrying the burden of peace.” Kanien kehaka theorist Taiaiake Alfred explains, “The word is made up of roti, connoting ‘he’; sken in relation to skennen, or ‘peace’; and hrakete, which is a suffix that combines the connotations of a burden and carrying.” Rotiskenhrakete is not simply an identity formulation but a social role; it doesn’t so much individualize as identify connection through absorption and synecdoche; it suggests what one does as much who one is. Ironically, the image of the Mohawk warrior has been mobilized in popular Canadian culture to represent forms of Indigenous hypermasculinity delinked from contemporary community concerns and absorbed into a non-Indigenous representational tradition in which Indigenous male characters vacillate among stereotypes of the noble savage, the bloodthirsty warrior, and the drunken absentee. In a contemporary moment saturated by such dehumanizing and decontextualized simulations, and at a time in which traditional Indigenous male roles and responsibilities have been obfuscated by colonial dispossession and other factors, this course will examine the social function of depictions of Indigenous masculinities in recent literature and film. We will employ masculinity theory and contemporary Indigenous literary theory to study poems, novels, life-writings, films, and oral tales by Indigenous and non-Indigenous artists, with an eye to how these sources represent, foment, and/or intervene in contemporary crises of Indigenous masculinity. The reading list will include works by authors like Gregory Scofield, Richard Van Camp, Jeannette Armstrong, Daniel David Moses, Tom Porter, and Joseph Boyden. Requirements: Course assignments will include oral teachings and a major written project, the parameters, scope, and execution of which will be determined by the class using consensus decision-making. Three term-hours; winter. S. McKegney

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ENGL-874* Topics in Canadian Literature IV

Topic: Alice Munro

Description: Although in Canada and elsewhere short fiction is overshadowed by attention to poetry and the novel, Alice Munro’s recent Nobel Prize is the culmination of a long, unlikely, and splendid career. But even her admirers are sometimes perplexed by her recent work, which engages us in ways that we do not expect from short fiction; perhaps, as John Updike observes, Munro has gone from the art of the epiphany to the art of the panorama; perhaps, as Munro says, her characters reach a moment of insight, “and then they’re wrong.” If her early stories seemed fully mature, they also seem conventional when contrasted with the later work. We will consider five collections from various stages of her long career. We will look closely at six stories from each collection, three per week. Three term-hours; winter. T. Ware

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ENGL-875 Studies in Postcolonial Literatures
Not offered 2014-15.
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ENGL-876* Topics in Postcolonial Literatures I

Topic: Remembering Slavery: History, Memory, and the Caribbean/Diasporic Novel

Description: In this course, we will be reading a number of Caribbean and Afro-diasporic historical novels that engage with the memory of slavery. Novelists examined in this course will include Alejo Carpentier, Edouard Glissant, Toni Morrison, Caryl Phillips, Andrea Levy, Dionne Brand, and Lawrence Hill. Literary readings will be supplemented by recent theoretical interventions on the memory of slavery, including discussions of the Haitian Revolution, recent commemorative celebrations of the abolition of slavery, and debates surrounding the value of modernist as opposed to postmodernist representations of the past. In the opening weeks of class, some attention will also be paid to eighteenth- and nineteenth-century slave narratives (notably, Solomon Northup’s Twelve Years a Slave and its recent cinematic adaptation). Requirements (tentative): One term paper (12–15 pages), one research presentation, minor close reading assignments, excellent participation and attendance. Three term-hours; fall. C. Bongie

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ENGL-877* Topics in Postcolonial Literatures II
Not offered 2014-15.
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ENGL-878* Topics in Postcolonial Literatures III
Not offered 2014-15.
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ENGL-879* Topics in Postcolonial Literatures IV
Not offered 2014-15.
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ENGL-880 Studies in American Literature
Not offered 2014-15.
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ENGL-881* Topics in American Literature I
Not offered 2014-15.
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ENGL-882* Topics in American Literature II
Not offered 2014-15.
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ENGL-883* Topics in American Literature III
Not offered 2014-15.
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ENGL-884* Topics in American Literature IV
Not offered 2014-15.
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ENGL-890* Directed Cross-Disciplinary Research
This course is designed to allow M.A. students to undertake a program of graduate-level directed reading under the supervision of faculty in departments outside English Language and Literature. Permission of the external supervisor is required in advance of registration, and workload and evaluation for the course must be approved by the graduate coordinator in English to ensure consistency with English graduate course norms.
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ENGL-892* Literary Internship
This course is a pass/fail credit course which offers MA students placements in research, literacy, language and arts-related community organizations, with the aim of providing those students with job experience that is directly related to literary studies. Sample placements may include such organizations as Kingston WritersFest, or the Strathy Language Unit at Queen's University. To achieve a pass in ENGL 892, the student shall submit to the Graduate Chair a time sheet (signed by his/her placement supervisor) stating that 50 hours of work have been completed satisfactorily, make a presentation to the department about the content of this work-study project; and hand in a brief written summary report (1200 words) on the experience to the Graduate Chair. G. Willmott.
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ENGL-895* Directed Reading
Directed study under the guidance of a faculty member in an area of the instructor’s expertise. Permission of instructor and graduate coordinator in English is required in advance of registration and is granted only under special circumstances. Workload and evaluation for the course must be approved by the graduate coordinator in English to ensure consistency with English graduate course norms. (Available only to students enrolled in the English MA program.)
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ENGL-899 Master's Thesis Research
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ENGL-900* Introduction to Professional and Pedagogical Skills II
This course is designed to acquaint doctoral students with some aspects of the teaching and scholarly skills and responsibilities of university faculty in order to prepare them for an academic career. In addition to practical training in essay marking, lecturing techniques and other teaching methods, the course will offer training in bibliographical and archival research, grant application, the academic job market, and other practical aspects of the professional study of literature. The course will consist of a number of seminars and workshops geared to the particular stage of the student’s progress over three years in the program. Three term-hours; fall. S. McKegney. This course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis.
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ENGL-903* Research Forum I
A regularly scheduled forum in which faculty, advanced doctoral students, and visiting scholars present model research problems and methodologies for discussion. Attendance is required. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis. Various speakers.
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ENGL-950* Comparative Literature I
An introduction to comparative literary studies as currently practised, with particular emphasis on the relevance to such studies of contemporary theories of literature and criticism. This course will be given jointly with CLAS-850*, FRAN-950*.
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ENGL-951* Comparative Literature II
Specialized study in a comparative context of particular authors, themes, movements, periods, genres, literary forms, or some combination of these elements. This course will be given jointly with CLAS-851*, FRAN-951*. 
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ENGL-990* Directed Cross-Disciplinary Research
This course is designed to allow doctoral students to undertake a program of graduate-level directed reading under the supervision of faculty in departments outside English Language and Literature. Permission of the external supervisor is required in advance of registration, and workload and evaluation for the course must be approved by the graduate coordinator in English to ensure consistency with English graduate course norms.
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ENGL-995* Directed Reading
Directed study under the guidance of a faculty member in an area of the instructor’s expertise. Permission of instructor and graduate coordinator in English is required in advance of registration and is granted only under special circumstances. Workload and evaluation for the course must be approved by the graduate coordinator in English to ensure consistency with English graduate course norms. (Available only to students enrolled in the English PhD program.)
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ENGL-999 Ph.D. Thesis Research
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Graduate Studies Courses of Instruction English Language and Literature
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