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Graduate Studies Courses of Instruction English Language and Literature


English Language and Literature
Full courses designated as Studies and half courses designated as Topics offer the study of a single work, a group of related works, an author or authors within the period or grouping indicated. The content of these offerings will vary from year to year. Not all the courses listed below will be offered in any one year, and a few are offered infrequently. A list of expected offerings with detailed description of course contents will be sent to applicants as soon as it can be drawn up.
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ENGL-800* Introduction to Professional and Pedagogical Skills I
This course introduces M.A. students to the scholarly study and teaching of English literature. The emphasis will be on training Teaching Assistants. There will be practical training in research skills, essay-marking, the academic counselling of students, and first-time teaching. There will also be some consideration of academic and non-academic careers for M.A.'s. Three term-hours; fall. S. McKegney. This course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis.
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ENGL-802* Practical Criticism
This course will provide students with the necessary tools to practice and to teach "close reading" in a broad range of genres from different historical and national contexts.  Students will engage in textual analysis through a series of practical exercises combined with readings of critical essays representing different approaches to the reading of literature.  Not offered 2015-16.
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ENGL-803* Research Forum I
A regularly scheduled forum in which faculty, advanced doctoral students, and visiting scholars present model research problems and methodologies for discussion. Attendance is required.Graded on a Pass/Fail basis. Various speakers.
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ENGL-810 Literary Criticism
Representative critical approaches from Aristotle to the moderns will be considered with particular attention to those which have most influenced contemporary attitudes. Not offered 2015-16.
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ENGL-811* Literary Theory I
Not offered 2015-16.
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ENGL-812* Literary Theory II
Not offered 2014-15.
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ENGL-813* Literary Theory III
Not offered 2015-16.
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ENGL-815* Topics in Literary Study I
Not offered 2015-16.
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ENGL-816* Topics in Literary Study II
Not offered 2015-16.
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ENGL-817* Topics in Literary Studies III

Topic: Publishing Practicum

Description: This seminar takes students through revision and submission stages from draft essay to article publication. The first section of the course will be devoted to discussion of the differences between coursework papers and published articles, and to a presentation and peer revision cycle of each student’s work. The second section of the course will discuss how to decide where to send article submissions, how to present them, and what to expect of the process. If there is time, we will build in a conference proposal/presentation stage. Students must have a complete draft essay to bring to the start of the course and be ready to welcome reading and response from peers. Success in the course requires regular attendance, constructive participation, revision responsive to instructor and peer review, and submission to an appropriate scholarly venue for publication. Note: Doctoral students are strongly urged to enroll in this course, and while the course is open to all students, doctoral students will have enrolment priority. Three term-hours; winter. S. McKegney.
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ENGL-818* Topics in Literary Study IV
Not offered 2015-16.
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ENGL-819* Introduction to Bibliography
Not offered 2015-16.
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ENGL-820 Anglo-Saxon and Beowulf
Not offered 2015-16.
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ENGL-821* Topics in Anglo-Saxon Literature I
Not offered 2015-16.
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ENGL-822 Old Norse
Not offered 2015-16.
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ENGL-823 Studies in Medieval Literature
Not offered 2015-16.
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ENGL-824* Topics in Medieval Literature I

Topic: Popular Literature of Late Medieval and Tudor England.

Description: This course will investigate the notion of popular culture (usually seen in opposition to either courtly aristocratic culture, or to the culture of the clerical elite), as it was manifested in a variety of literary forms from the 14th through the 16th centuries in England. During the course, we will examine works of popular literature, including lyrics, ballads, plays, and popular romances, especially those dealing with popular chivalric heroes such as Gawain, and outlaw heroes such as Robin Hood. Discussions will include the role of orality and performance in popular culture of the period, and of carnivalesque inversions of authority as found in festivals such as the Lords of Misrule. All works will be read in the original Middle English, and instruction on the reading and pronunciation of Middle English will be provided. As one goal of the course involves the role of oral performance in popular culture, students will be expected to prepare (but not memorize) a text (a lyric, romance or part of a play) for performance. Three term-hours; fall. R. Wehlau.

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ENGL-825* Topics in Medieval Literature II
Not offered 2015-16.
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ENGL-826* Topics in Medieval Literature III

Topic: Gender and Sexuality in the Middle Ages

Description: This course will explore premodern constructions of gender and sexuality, seeking to locate both continuities and discontinuities with modern conceptions and practices. While labels such as “gay,” “genderqueer,” “transgendered” did not exist in the Middle Ages, medieval people imagined and engaged in types of gender shifting that help us to understand the necessity for labile terminology to describe identities linked with gendered and sexual practices. Largely focusing on medieval Europe, this course considers how some aspects of medieval culture, such as celibacy, imitatio Christi, knighthood, class hierarchy, shaped notions of gender and sexuality. Though examining theological, medical, and legal writings, moral guidebooks, chronicles, artwork, and literary works, this course will engage texts from the early to late Middle Ages in dialogue with contemporary theoretical writing to attempt to articulate specificities of the medieval sex/gender system. Requirements include regular attendance and participation, oral presentation, research paper. Three term-hours; winter. M. Pappano.

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ENGL-827* Topics in Medieval Literature IV
Not offered 2015-16.
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ENGL-828* Chaucer
Not offered 2015-16.
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ENGL-830 Studies in Early Modern Literature and Culture
Not offered 2015-16.
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ENGL-831* Topics in Early Modern Literature and Culture I
Not offered 2015-16.
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ENGL-832* Topics in Early Modern Literature and Culture II

Topic: Shakespeare and Early Modern Print Culture

Description: This course will approach Shakespeare’s plays and poems as texts circulating in the overlapping realms of oral, manuscript, and print publication. We will investigate the mechanisms and agencies through which Shakespeare’s works were constituted as text, how they were transformed  across the realms of manuscript production, vocal recitation, print publication, and, frequently, back into manuscript or theatrical re-presentation. The course will focus on those works of Shakespeare, some apocryphal, that have a particularly interesting or complicated textual history: Venus and Adonis, Romeo and Juliet, Henry V, Hamlet, A Yorkshire Tragedy, King Lear, the Sonnets, Pericles, and the manuscript fragment of Sir Thomas More in Shakespeare’s handwriting. Topics of study will include the uses of manuscript in the theatre (actors’ parts, rehearsal scripts, promptbooks, companies’ literary archives); the printing and publishing trades (licensing and censorship, copyright, papermaking, manufacture of books, social coding of formats, patronage, bookselling); and early modern reading practices (‘analogical’ reading, commonplacing, annotation, oral reading, coteries, bookbinding and patterns of book ownership). Students will work closely with facsimiles and become familiar with some major research resources in early modern studies (the Short-Title Catalogue, the Stationers’ Register, the database Early English Books Online, the Database of Early English Playbooks, and Greg’s Bibliography of English Printed Drama to the Restoration). Although focused on Shakespeare and early modern textual culture, the course will also be designed to provide an introduction to the methodologies of cultural bibliography and book history that should be of use to all students. Three term-hours; spring. M. Straznicky.

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ENGL-833* Topics in Early Modern Literature and Culture III

Topic: Humanism and Renaissance Drama

Description: Humanism was an intellectual movement that began in fourteenth century Italy and was focused on the recovery of classical literature and the cultivation of the eloquence and modes of authority that had characterized classical writers. It manifested in England by the mid-sixteenth century as an educational program instantiated in an ever-widening network of town grammar schools. All of the major playwrights of the Elizabethan commercial theatre (e.g., Shakespeare, Marlowe, Jonson) attended, or are assumed to have attended grammar schools, where they learned Latin by studying and performing Latin drama, imitating the poetry of Ovid and developing the rhetorical craft of Cicero. It is fair to say that the spread of humanist culture via the grammar school was a necessary (but not sufficient) condition for the flourishing of the drama in late sixteenth and early seventeenth century England. But we can also see in that drama an ambivalent relation to the assumptions about the power of learning and language that drove the humanist project. In this course we will interrogate the relationship between humanism and the commercial stage. We will begin by reading humanist writers such as Erasmus and Thomas More, looking at their assumptions about knowledge and eloquence and the way these were promoted in grammar schools. We will also look at the role that the drama played in humanist culture and education, reading interludes and academic plays. Then we will turn our attention to the commercial stage, considering such well-known plays as Dr. Faustus, Hamlet, The Alchemist, and The Tempest, asking what they tell us about the intellectual, political and economic legacy of humanism in England. Three term-hours; fall. E. Hanson.

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ENGL-834* Topics in Early Modern Literature and Culture IV
Not offered 2015-16.
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ENGL-835* Topics in Early Modern Literature and Culture V
Not offered 2015-16.
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ENGL-836* Topics in Early Modern Literature and Culture VI
Not offered 2015-16.
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ENGL-840 Studies in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature
Not offered 2015-16.
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ENGL-841* Topics in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature I
Not offered 2015-16.
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ENGL-842* Topics in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature II
Not offered 2015-16.
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ENGL-843* Topics in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature III
Not offered 2015-16.
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ENGL-844* Topics in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature IV
Not offered 2015-16.
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ENGL-850 Studies in Romantic Literature
Not offered 2015-16.
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ENGL-851* Topics in Romanticism I
Not offered 2015-16.
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ENGL-852* Topics in Romanticism II

Topic: Secret Witnesses: Abolition, Revolution, and Transatlantic Memory

Description: In this course, we will be examining representations of slavery and its abolition in a number of texts published on both sides of the Atlantic between the late 1780s and 1833 (the year the British Parliament passed the Abolition of Slavery Act). The course will proceed chronologically, starting with such founding texts of the abolitionist movement as Thomas Clarkson’s 1786 Essay on slavery and Olaudah Equiano’s 1789 Interesting Narrative, and proceeding at least as far as Mary Prince’s 1831 History. The goal of this course is two- fold. First, to gain an in-depth exposure to the complexities of abolitionist discourse, as expressed in the literary practice of a variety of Romantic-era writers and as analyzed in recent theoretical interventions concerned with understanding the genealogical origins of our own present-day “humanitarian moment.” The second main goal will be to examine some of the key (historical and fictional) representations of the Haitian Revolution (1791–1804) from the first three decades of the nineteenth century (such as Leonora Sansay’s Secret History and Victor Hugo’s Bug-Jargal) in order to gauge the extent to which that world-historical revolution challenged the ideological assumptions of abolitionist discourse and the literary conventions upon which that discourse relied (e.g., those associated with the sentimental and Gothic novels). Three term-hours; fall. C. Bongie.

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ENGL-853* Topics in Romanticism III

Topic: The Discourse of Illumination in William Blake

Description: A study of the development of Blake’s poetry, with special emphasis on his use of biblical sources and experimentation with a variety of narrative forms. The evolution of his pictorial and poetic style will offer a focus for our examination of Blake, covering briefly the early works such as The Songs of Innocence and of Experience and The Marriage of Heaven and Hell and concentrating more heavily on the latter works, including such works as the Lambeth poems, Vala or The Four Zoas, and Milton. This course will also consider the significance of conscious verbal and narrative obscurity as part of Blake’s attempt to present an apocalyptic vision of the world that challenges conventional modes of thinking, perception, and interpretation. Three term-hours; winter. J. Pierce.

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ENGL-854* Topics in Romanticism IV

Not offered 2015-16.

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ENGL-855 Studies in Victorian Literature
Not offered 2015-16.
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ENGL-856* Topics in Victorian Literature I
Not offered 2015-16.
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ENGL-857* Topics in Victorian Literature II

Topic: The Brontë Myth

Description: This course takes its title from Lucasta Miller’s examination of the cultural reception of the Brontë novels from their publication to the present day. The emphasis will be on how the Brontë sisters and their works were and are constructed in biography, memoirs and literary criticism. We will explore what Patsy Stoneman calls “the ways in which people transform texts” as well as “the ways in which texts transform people.” We will begin with Charlotte Brontë’s deliberate fashioning of a Brontë myth in order to protect her sisters’ reputations (among other less laudable motives). We will consider the enormous influence of Elizabeth Gaskell’s biography The Life of Charlotte Brontë. We will examine reviews of the novels when they appeared and more recent influential critical accounts such as Terry Eagleton’s Myth’s of Power: A Marxist Study of the Brontë’s. The point of the course is to examine the ideological work of “the [Brontë] author” in and through the Brontë texts. We are likely to read The Professor, Jane Eyre, Shirley and Villette by Charlotte Brontë; Agnes Grey and The Tenant of Wildfell Hall by Anne Brontë; and Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë. We will also read secondary work  such as Elizabeth Gaskell’s The Life of Charlotte Brontë; Terry Eagleton’s Myths of Power; Lucasta Miller’s The Brontë Myth; Patsy Stoneman’s Brontë Transformations; Michel Foucault’s “What is an Author?”; and a selection of essays and reviews. Three term-hours; fall. M. Berg.

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ENGL-858* Topics in Victorian Literature III
Not offered 2015-16.
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ENGL-859* Topics in Victorian Literature IV

Topic: Victorian Cities.

Description: This course will look at the representation of the modern city in Victorian fiction and prose writings. Following the rise of industrial capitalism, the metropolis came to represent a space of economic promise and individual mobility, as well as social instability and uncertainty.  More than just the setting for a story, the Victorian city played an integral role in the formation of new and often contradictory narratives on democratic individualism and social conflict. We will look at how Victorian writers employed innovations in both form and content to represent these complex relationships and the modern subjectivities that comprise this new urban landscape. Reading from a representative sampling of texts (including the industrial novel, gothic fiction, new women writings, and naturalist narratives), we will ask who has access to these urban spaces and focus our conversations specifically on representations of class, gender, and nationhood. Our conversations and presentations will concentrate on representations of class and economic mobility in authors like Dickensand Morrison; gender and urban politics in authors like Hepworth Dixon and James; and nationhood and cosmopolitanism in authors like Stevenson and Doyle. Contextual and theoretical readings on the city and urban subjectivities will likely include (but not be limited to) selections from Baudelaire, Benjamin, de Certeau, and Lefebvre. Three term-hours; winter. S. B. Cameron.

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ENGL-860 Studies in Modern and Contemporary Literature and Culture
Not offered 2015-16.
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ENGL-861* Topics in Modernism I

Topic: T. S. Eliot and Virginia Woolf

Description: T.S. Eliot and Virginia Woolf were almost exact contemporaries (born in 1882 and 1888, respectively), readers and critics of each others’ work, and close friends for over twenty years. Although they are rarely considered together as a pair, Eliot and Woolf exemplify some of the most fascinating contestations of modernism: aesthetics and cultural critique; gender troubling; sacred and secular expositions; and the formal poetic and narratological experiments of the early twentieth-century avant-garde. Together we will explore some of the striking correspondences and affinities that exist in Eliot and Woolf’s poetic, aesthetic, and thematic preoccupations by reading Eliot’s major poetry from “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” to “Gerontion,” The Waste Land, “Ash Wednesday,” and Four Quartets in juxtaposition with Woolf’s To the Lighthouse, Mrs. Dalloway, Orlando, The Waves, and “A Sketch of the Past.” Three term-hours; winter. G. McIntire.

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ENGL-862* Topics in Modernism II

Topic: Modernist Elegy

Description: This seminar will explore the discourse of elegy in British and American modernist literature (1914–1939). Our starting point will be the tension between elegy and “anti- elegy” in writing on loss inspired by the First World War: that is, between the kind of writing encouraging what Freud considered “success” in mourning, and the kind that disrupts closure, fostering melancholia. We’ll then go on to consider the ways in which modernist formal experimentation (for example, devices such as depersonalization, allusion, fragmentation, and ellipsis) reflect and develop this tension. While our starting point in war literature will lead us to consider the ways nationalism shapes mourning practices (and vice versa), modernism was a transnational movement, and elegy, as a genre, lends itself to cross-pollination across national divides. We will therefore be alert to the ways in which various cultural traditions inflect the injunctions to mourn (or resist mourning) in the works we study. As we move through term, we will also trace an increasing self-consciousness in the use of consolatory discourse during the 1930s, as the threat posed by Fascism intensifies and the prospect of another World War looms. We’ll see writers asking pragmatic questions about which consolations have a chance of surviving the repetition of World War, and adjusting their standards for truthfulness in elegy accordingly. The seminar will encourage the close reading of poetry and both fictional and non-fictional prose. It will also incite discussion about the politics of mourning practices and about how the concepts of elegy emerging from World War I may have produced problematic distortions in the literary history of modernism as we know it. Authors  considered will include Rupert Brooke, Siegfried Sassoon, Wilfred Owen, Vera Brittain, T. S. Eliot, Virginia Woolf, George Orwell, W. H. Auden, Stephen Spender, Wallace Stevens, Langston Hughes, James Weldon Johnson, and Edwin Rolph, but students will be free pursue work  in their term papers on other modernist authors of special interest to them. Three term-hours; spring. P. Rae.

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ENGL-863* Topics in Modernism III
Not offered 2015-16.
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ENGL-864* Topics in Modernism IV
Not offered 2015-16.
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ENGL-865* Topics in Contemporary Literature and Culture I
Not offered 2015-16.
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ENGL-866* Topics in Contemporary Literature and Culture II
Not offered 2015-16.
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ENGL-867* Topics in Contemporary Literature and Culture III

Topic: Modernism and Primitivism

Description: Beginning with a discussion of primitivism as a transhistorical mode, we will focus on the particular and diverse expressions of primitivism in the Modernist period from the late nineteenth to the mid twentieth centuries, when widespread spiritual malaise and volatile political-economic conflicts in Canada, the British Isles, and America were accompanied by the emergence of African, African-American, and Native American cultural production in a cosmopolitan public sphere. We will look, for example, at the rise of antimodernism, the fascination with degenerative history, the complex assimilation of Black and Indigenous cultures, the renewal of paganism, the notion of the savage within, and erotic liberations – all in the contexts of utopian or dystopian visions of the primitive in Stoker’s Dracula, Yeats’s plays, Conrad’s Lord Jim, Stein’s Melanctha, Eliot’s and Pound’s poetry, H. D.’s poetry and memoir, Lawrence’s Women in Love, Watson’s Oedipus stories, and Golden Age comic strips (this list partial and subject to revision).  Students will be encouraged to pursue projects that range across literary and other media.  Evaluation will be based on weekly reading assignments, an oral seminar assignment, and a research essay. Three term-hours; fall. G. Willmott.

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ENGL-868* Topics in Contemporary Literature and Culture IV

Topic: The Aboriginal Voice

Description: In his landmark essay, “Aboriginal Text in Context,” Cree scholar, and former publisher of Theytus Books, Greg Young-Ing  remarked that “The creation and/or expression of culture by Aboriginal peoples, through  any traditional medium or any contemporary  medium or any combination thereof, constitutes an expression of what can be referred to as the ‘Aboriginal Voice’.” Given that Young-Ing’s essay appeared some 15 years ago, and that contemporary Aboriginal cultural expression in Canada has continued at an ever- increasing level of creativity and production, this course will consider a selection of literary work  by self-identified Aboriginal authors through  which we might examine what constitutes the “Aboriginal Voice.” How do writers from a diversity of Aboriginal cultures and communities contribute to this “voice,” if indeed it exists?  We will begin by considering spirituality as a fundamental component of Aboriginal identity and a jumping off point to questions associated with Aboriginal aesthetics, along with the numerous themes arising from colonialism, in our assessment of the “Aboriginal Voice” in Canada. To provide context for this body of literature, our study will draw upon recent critical conversations by Aboriginal writers discussing what Cree scholar and artist Neal McLeod has termed “Indigenous Poetics in Canada” (2014), as well as the dominant criticism that has framed the reception of the writing around socio-political issues. Considering a wide range of texts (subject to change), we will study poetry, plays, films, and novels by Aboriginal artists such as Jeannette Armstrong, Tomson Highway, Marvin Francis, Robert Arthur Alexie, and Tara Beagan. Three term-hours; fall. A. G. Ruffo.

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ENGL-870 Studies in Canadian Literature
Not offered 2015-16.
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ENGL-871* Topics in Canadian Literature I

Topic: Postwar Poetry of the Toronto-Kingston Corridor

Description: This course will study the poetry of postwar Ontario, with a special interest in the Toronto-Kingston region.  Because we will begin with Al Purdy and then turn to poets influenced by him (Atwood, Wallace, Ondaatje, and McKay), this course will raise questions about regionalism and nationalism, though other approaches are both possible and desirable. In contemporary Canadian criticism, Toronto is often constructed as the center against which regions react, and Ontario becomes the region that does not always recognize itself as such. If we recognize the virtues and the problems in all collective identities, regionalism should be as contentious as nationalism.  And if Purdy’s own nationalist stance is unavailable to contemporary criticism, as Sam Solecki argues in The Last Canadian Poet, his insistence that even the largest concerns are rooted in local settings helps explain his continuing influence. We will also read such works as “The Cinnamon Peeler” and thirsty, which are from Canadian nationalism.  The course will deal with some of the most widely discussed Canadian authors, whose work  reveals that poetry continues to matter despite being overshadowed by fiction. Three term-hours; winter. T. Ware.

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ENGL-872* Topics in Canadian Literature II

Topic: The Environment in Contemporary Literature in Canada

Description: This seminar will be concerned with contemporary Canadian and Aboriginal texts that take environmental issues as their topic. According to the editors of Greening the Maple: Canadian Ecocriticism in Context, “literary respondents to Canadian environments have attempted to discover or invent vocabularies and literary forms appropriate to the scale and the particularities of the country” (xxv).  The seminar will focus on the role that the natural environment plays in select works of the Canadian and Aboriginal imagination and intends to acknowledge the historical, cultural, and social specificities that affect artistic and cultural production in this country. We will consider a variety of modes and genres, including the novel, Indigenous ways of storytelling, journalistic writing, creative nonfiction, “ecopoetry,” and “ecodrama,” to explore questions of ecological poetics and aesthetics. As Lawrence Buell argues, “environmental interpretation requires us to rethink our assumptions about the nature of representation, reference, metaphor, characterization, personae, and canonicity” (The Environmental Imagination 2). Texts concerned with environmental degradation also challenge us to consider the relationship between aesthetics, responsibility, and environmental activism. Our discussion will be informed by various ecocritical approaches including ecofeminism, environmental justice, “eco-ability,” bioregionalism, and urban ecocriticism. Authors may include Di Brandt, Marie Clements, Ann Eriksson, Charlotte Gill, Karsten Heuer, Helen Humphreys, Thomas King, J.B. MacKinnon, Don McKay, Timothy Taylor, Sheila Watt-Cloutier, Thomas Wharton, and Alissa York. Three term-hours; fall. P. Fachinger.

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ENGL-873* Topics in Canadian Literature III
Not offered 2015-16.
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ENGL-874* Topics in Canadian Literature IV
Not offered 2015-16.
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ENGL-875 Studies in Postcolonial Literatures
Not offered 2015-16.
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ENGL-876* Topics in Postcolonial Literatures I
Not offered 2015-16.
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ENGL-877* Topics in Postcolonial Literatures II
Not offered 2015-16.
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ENGL-878* Topics in Postcolonial Literatures III
Not offered 2015-16.
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ENGL-879* Topics in Postcolonial Literatures IV
Not offered 2015-16.
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ENGL-880 Studies in American Literature
Not offered 2015-16.
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ENGL-881* Topics in American Literature I

Topic: Permacultural Studies, or How to Make Critique Sustainable

Description: In an age of peak oil, food crisis, and a changing and unpredictable climate, cultural critics quite rightly have drawn on the strategies of critique amply available in the broader cultural studies toolkit. To the oil economy, to the legacies of nuclear, coal, and gas industries, to industrial agriculture, cultural critics have quite rightly said “no,” providing richly layered historical diagnoses variously indicting the Enlightenment, capitalism, imperialism, or anthropocentrism more generally. As useful and necessary as this form of critique has been, however, it remains vulnerable to the paucity of imagination that characterizes the world more generally. To what, a beleaguered (eco)critic might ask, can we say “yes”? Now more than ever, it seems to be easier, as Fredric Jameson opined some years ago, “to imagine the deterioration of the earth and of nature than the breakdown of late capitalism,” a phenomenon partly due to our residual postmodern fear of utopian metanarratives. This course is an experiment in reviving the ecotopian imagination. Drawing on the principles of permaculture (earth care, people care, fair share), we will investigate alternatives among us, from practices of ecological and community supported agriculture to decentralized forms of power generation (wind, solar, tidal, geothermal) to intentional communities and slow economies. We will begin in the 1960s and work our way to the present, and while we will read some ecotopian fiction, the wager of this course is that the permacultural imagination might be found more readily in other genre: essay, poetry, drama, music, visual art, landscape architecture, and film. Three term-hours; winter. M. Wallace.

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ENGL-882* Topics in American Literature II

Topic: Contemporary American Poetry—From Bishop to Ashbery

Description: This course has two main aims.  One is to familiarize students with contemporary American poetry; the other, no less important, is to impart close reading skills through the detailed analysis of literary texts—something we will do throughout the semester. We’ll read poetry from midcentury to the 1980s, and explore the voices, languages, schools, polemics, and histories that make up the varied and sometimes contested terrain of contemporary American poetry.  While special attention will be given to the poetry of Elizabeth Bishop and John Ashbery, we’ll also read other poets so as to familiarize ourselves with a diversity of poetic styles, approaches, and themes. These other poets will include Allen Ginsberg, Frank O’Hara, John Berryman, Robert Lowell, Sylvia Plath, May Swenson, James Merrill, and Mark Strand. Three term-hours; winter. Y. Schlick.

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ENGL-883* Topics in American Literature III
Not offered 2015-16.
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ENGL-884* Topics in American Literature IV
Not offered 2015-16.
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ENGL-890* Directed Cross-Disciplinary Research
This course is designed to allow M.A. students to undertake a program of graduate-level directed reading under the supervision of faculty in departments outside English Language and Literature. Permission of the external supervisor is required in advance of registration, and workload and evaluation for the course must be approved by the graduate coordinator in English to ensure consistency with English graduate course norms.
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ENGL-892* Literary Internship
This course is a pass/fail credit course which offers MA students placements in research, literacy, language and arts-related community organizations, with the aim of providing those students with job experience that is directly related to literary studies. Sample placements may include such organizations as Kingston WritersFest, or the Strathy Language Unit at Queen's University. To achieve a pass in ENGL 892, the student shall submit to the Graduate Chair a time sheet (signed by his/her placement supervisor) stating that 50 hours of work have been completed satisfactorily, make a presentation to the department about the content of this work-study project; and hand in a brief written summary report (1200 words) on the experience to the Graduate Chair. G. Willmott.
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ENGL-895* Directed Reading
Directed study under the guidance of a faculty member in an area of the instructor’s expertise. Permission of instructor and graduate coordinator in English is required in advance of registration and is granted only under special circumstances. Workload and evaluation for the course must be approved by the graduate coordinator in English to ensure consistency with English graduate course norms. (Available only to students enrolled in the English MA program.)
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ENGL-899 Master's Thesis Research
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ENGL-900* Introduction to Professional and Pedagogical Skills II
This course is designed to acquaint doctoral students with some aspects of the teaching and scholarly skills and responsibilities of university faculty in order to prepare them for an academic career. In addition to practical training in essay marking, lecturing techniques and other teaching methods, the course will offer training in bibliographical and archival research, grant application, the academic job market, and other practical aspects of the professional study of literature. The course will consist of a number of seminars and workshops geared to the particular stage of the student’s progress over three years in the program. Three term-hours; fall. S. McKegney. This course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis.
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ENGL-903* Research Forum I
A regularly scheduled forum in which faculty, advanced doctoral students, and visiting scholars present model research problems and methodologies for discussion. Attendance is required. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis. Various speakers.
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ENGL-950* Comparative Literature I
An introduction to comparative literary studies as currently practised, with particular emphasis on the relevance to such studies of contemporary theories of literature and criticism. This course will be given jointly with CLAS-850*, FRAN-950*.
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ENGL-951* Comparative Literature II
Specialized study in a comparative context of particular authors, themes, movements, periods, genres, literary forms, or some combination of these elements. This course will be given jointly with CLAS-851*, FRAN-951*. 
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ENGL-990* Directed Cross-Disciplinary Research
This course is designed to allow doctoral students to undertake a program of graduate-level directed reading under the supervision of faculty in departments outside English Language and Literature. Permission of the external supervisor is required in advance of registration, and workload and evaluation for the course must be approved by the graduate coordinator in English to ensure consistency with English graduate course norms.
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ENGL-995* Directed Reading
Directed study under the guidance of a faculty member in an area of the instructor’s expertise. Permission of instructor and graduate coordinator in English is required in advance of registration and is granted only under special circumstances. Workload and evaluation for the course must be approved by the graduate coordinator in English to ensure consistency with English graduate course norms. (Available only to students enrolled in the English PhD program.)
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ENGL-999 Ph.D. Thesis Research
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Graduate Studies Courses of Instruction English Language and Literature
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