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2016-2017 Academic Year
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Graduate Studies Courses of Instruction English Language and Literature


English Language and Literature
Full courses designated as Studies and half courses designated as Topics offer the study of a single work, a group of related works, an author or authors within the period or grouping indicated. The content of these offerings will vary from year to year. Not all the courses listed below will be offered in any one year, and a few are offered infrequently. A list of expected offerings with detailed description of course contents will be sent to applicants as soon as it can be drawn up.
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ENGL-800* Introduction to Professional and Pedagogical Skills I
This course introduces M.A. students to the scholarly study and teaching of English literature. The emphasis will be on training Teaching Assistants. There will be practical training in research skills, essay-marking, the academic counselling of students, and first-time teaching. There will also be some consideration of academic and non-academic careers for M.A.'s. This course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis. Three term-hours; fall. L. Ritchie.
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ENGL-802* Practical Criticism
This course will provide students with the necessary tools to practice and to teach "close reading" in a broad range of genres from different historical and national contexts.  Students will engage in textual analysis through a series of practical exercises combined with readings of critical essays representing different approaches to the reading of literature.  Not offered 2016-17.
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ENGL-803* Research Forum I
A regularly scheduled forum in which faculty, advanced doctoral students, and visiting scholars present model research problems and methodologies for discussion. Attendance is required. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis. Various speakers.
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ENGL-810 Literary Criticism
Representative critical approaches from Aristotle to the moderns will be considered with particular attention to those which have most influenced contemporary attitudes. Not offered 2016-17.
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ENGL-811* Literary Theory I
Not offered 2016-17.
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ENGL-812* Literary Theory II
Not offered 2016-17.
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ENGL-813* Literary Theory III
Not offered 2016-17.
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ENGL-815* Topics in Literary Study I
Not offered 2016-17.
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ENGL-816* Topics in Literary Study II
Not offered 2016-17.
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ENGL-817* Topics in Literary Studies III

Topic: Publishing Practicum

Description: This seminar takes students through revision and submission stages from draft essay to article publication. The first section of the course will be devoted to discussion of the differences between coursework papers and published articles, and to a presentation and peer revision cycle of each student’s work. The second section of the course will discuss how to decide where to send article submissions, how to present them, and what to expect of the process. If there is time, we will build in a conference proposal/presentation stage. Students must have a complete draft essay to bring to the start of the course and be ready to welcome reading and response from peers. Success in the course requires regular attendance, constructive participation, revision responsive to instructor and peer review, and submission to an appropriate scholarly venue for publication. Note: Doctoral students are strongly urged to enroll in this course, and while the course is open to all students, doctoral students will have enrolment priority. Three term-hours; winter. M. Pappano.
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ENGL-818* Topics in Literary Study IV
Not offered 2016-17.
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ENGL-819* Introduction to Bibliography
Not offered 2016-17.
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ENGL-820 Anglo-Saxon and Beowulf
Not offered 2016-17.
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ENGL-821* Topics in Anglo-Saxon Literature I
Not offered 2016-17.
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ENGL-822 Old Norse
Not offered 2016-17.
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ENGL-823 Studies in Medieval Literature
Not offered 2016-17.
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ENGL-824* Topics in Medieval Literature I
Topic: King Arthur: Medieval to Modern Arthurian legend has enthralled audiences over a period of more than a thousand years, from its first inception as a legend of British resistance to the Anglo-Saxon invasion up to its current iterations in a multitude of movie and television interpretations. This course will examine the earliest Arthurian texts and follow the tradition into the present day. Works to be read include selections from major interpreters such as Geoffrey of Monmouth, Sir Thomas Malory, Alfred Lord Tennyson and T. H. White. Most medieval texts will be read in English translation, but some will be in Middle English; no prior acquaintance with medieval literature or Middle English is required.

Apart from the better-known writers, many other authors and poets have employed Arthurian themes and narratives in their work, and students will be asked to research some of these lesser-known versions of the Arthurian story, and to present on the results of their research. We will thus be able to piece together a history of the tradition that includes a variety of high cultural and popular interpretations of the narrative over time.

Throughout the course, we will return to the following central questions: what cultural purposes do myths of King Arthur serve? Whose values do they reflect? To what extent do they engage with the past, or with their contemporary present?

Assessment: Class Presentation and Report: 25%, Class Participation: 25%, Essay: 50%.

Three term-hours; fall. R. Wehlau.
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ENGL-825* Topics in Medieval Literature II

Topic: Introduction to Old English Language and Poetry

Description: This course will provide an introduction to the language and literature of the Anglo-Saxons. Students will be introduced to the grammar and vocabulary of Old English, and will read a variety of Old English poem, including elegies such as The Wife’s Lament and The Wanderer, heroic poetry, riddles, maxims and charms, and selections from Beowulf in the context of current critical approaches. Works will be read partly in translation, partly in the original Old English, but with ample glossing and / or side by side translation. Classes will consist of close class reading and discussion. Offered jointly with ENGL-411.

Assessment: Students will be assessed on class participation, an oral presentation, and an essay.

Three term-hours; winter. R. Wehlau.

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ENGL-826* Topics in Medieval Literature III
Not offered 2016-17.
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ENGL-827* Topics in Medieval Literature IV
Not offered 2016-17.
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ENGL-828* Chaucer
Not offered 2016-17.
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ENGL-830 Studies in Early Modern Literature and Culture
Not offered 2016-17.
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ENGL-831* Topics in Early Modern Literature and Culture I

Topic: The Classical and the Popular in Renaissance Drama

Description: The drama of Renaissance England arguably achieves its extraordinary vitality through the fusion it effects of classical forms and English popular traditions.  In this course we will examine this fusion in the works of Christopher Marlowe, William Shakespeare and Ben Jonson. All three playwrights attended humanist grammar schools where they encountered the works of Plautus, Terence and Seneca. From these plays they gleaned genres (comedy and tragedy), situations (identity mix-ups, revenge plots) and character types (the wily servant, the noble avenger, the braggart soldier). But they also encountered English popular drama, which was for the most part religious in purpose and content. From this tradition they gleaned different character types (the Vice, the clown, the shrew), modes of signification (allegory) and a subtle sense of theatrical space. In this course we will first look at some instances of both the classical and the popular dramatic traditions and then at some of the major plays of the English Renaissance (Dr. Faustus, Hamlet, Twelfth Night, and King Lear which draw on both traditions. Our goal will be to assess what thematic and dramatic meanings are made available by the combinations of classical and popular English traditions these playwrights wrought. Three term-hours; fall. E. Hanson.

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ENGL-832* Topics in Early Modern Literature and Culture II
Not offered 2016-17.
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ENGL-833* Topics in Early Modern Literature and Culture III
Not offered 2016-17.
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ENGL-834* Topics in Early Modern Literature and Culture IV
Not offered 2016-17.
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ENGL-835* Topics in Early Modern Literature and Culture V

Topic: Practical Criticism—Close Reading the Renaissance

Description: This course is designed for graduate students interested in developing their skills in textual analysis. It will primarily be focused on texts from the period in which the first treatises and discourses on English poetics were produced, and will thus offer an historical perspective on why we value literary form. It will also consider how and why Renaissance texts formed a focal point for mid-twentieth-century critics whose work fostered the practice at North American universities. Weighing the enduring value of the skill, we will dedicate the majority of each class meeting to its exercise by collaborating on the analysis of one or a small number of literary texts. While early modern material will constitute our focus in the first two-thirds of the course, in later weeks we will examine texts from subsequent periods to incorporate the study of different genres and more modern writing techniques.

Three term-hours; winter. G. Dujardin.

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ENGL-836* Topics in Early Modern Literature and Culture VI
Not offered 2016-17.
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ENGL-840 Studies in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature
Not offered 2016-17.
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ENGL-841* Topics in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature I
Not offered 2016-17.
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ENGL-842* Topics in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature II
Not offered 2016-17.
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ENGL-843* Topics in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature III

Topic: The Whole Show

Description: This course surveys major developments in London’s theatrical offerings during the Restoration and the eighteenth century, 1660-1780. Our readings will include plays, as well as historical and modern criticism. We will consider such topics as acting styles, the spatial geography and economic impact of theatre, theatrical censorship, celebrity, the period’s ‘improvements’ on Shakespeare, and pantomime. Two field trips within Kingston will form an exciting (and mandatory) part of this course: you will attend a campus production of an eighteenth-century play; and also drama-related sessions of your choice at the Canadian Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies conference in Kingston. Both of these events take place Oct. 26-30, 2016.

Three term-hours; fall. L. Ritchie.

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ENGL-844* Topics in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature IV

Topic: Samuel Richardson and the Rise of the Novel

Description: A study of Richardson’s epistolary novels Pamela and Clarissa in two contexts: first, the immediate social-cultural and literary-philosophical (e.g., engagements with class and gender politics, the print marketplace, narrative forms, theories of knowledge and ethics), and, second, the critical: the place of Richardson’s work as pivotal in modern histories of the novel.

Assessment by seminar presentation, a final paper and participation.

NOTE TO STUDENTS: Clarissa is over a million words long!  Please start reading the Penguin edition well in advance of January.

Three term-hours; winter. C. Fanning.

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ENGL-850 Studies in Romantic Literature
Not offered 2016-17.
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ENGL-851* Topics in Romanticism I

Topic: Austen and Her Contemporaries

Description: This course examines the six published novels of Jane Austen, as well as the writings of some of her major contemporaries. We will read Austen’s novels in the order of their composition (not their publication), setting them both against one another, and against works by Walter Scott, Lord Byron, John Keats, and William Hazlitt. We will assess the cultural restraints that these writers both overturned and exploited, as well as their distinctive responses to issues ranging from romance, taste, and domesticity to class, sexuality, and imperialism.

Three term-hours; winter. R. Morrison.

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ENGL-852* Topics in Romanticism II
Not offered 2016-17.
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ENGL-853* Topics in Romanticism III
Not offered 2016-17.
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ENGL-854* Topics in Romanticism IV
Topic: Thomas De Quincey

Some addicts commit suicide. Others overdose. Still others manage to avoid both these fates and stay alive. They are ‘the ones who may well go on to write abuse confessionals’, Stuart Walton declares in Out of It (2002), ‘and each is a distant descendant of De Quincey’. This course examines De Quincey’s seminal narratives of drug addiction, including Confessions of an English Opium-Eater (1821) and its sequel, Suspiria de Profundis (1845). It then explores the works of some of De Quincey’s major ‘descendants’, including Edgar Allan Poe, Wilkie Collins, Oscar Wilde, Virginia Woolf, Malcolm Lowry, and Ann Marlowe.

Three term-hours; spring. R. Morrison.
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ENGL-855 Studies in Victorian Literature
Not offered 2016-17.
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ENGL-856* Topics in Victorian Literature I
Not offered 2016-17.
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ENGL-857* Topics in Victorian Literature II
Not offered 2016-17.
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ENGL-858* Topics in Victorian Literature III

Topic: The “Other” Body in Victorian Literature

Description: This course will consider the roles of various non-normative bodies in a selection of Victorian texts. We will examine the animal, disabled and queer bodies that populate Victorian novels, in an attempt to read the effects of a Victorian social hierarchy which constructed “bodies that matter” – to use Judith Butler’s phrase – at the expense of those that did not. Victorian social science understood human identity in terms of its distance from or proximity to “animal type.” This course aims to understand the mechanisms by which certain bodies were rendered “Other.” The paradox, however, is that far from being overlooked, such “Othered” bodies are a preoccupation of Victorian texts and culture.

We will read a selection of essays in queer theory, disability theory and animal studies.

Primary texts may include: Elizabeth Gaskell, Mary Barton; Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, and The Professor; George Eliot, The Mill on the Floss; Virginia Woolf, Flush; Radclyffe Hall, The Well of Loneliness, Michael Field, Whym Chow: Flame of Love.

Three term-hours; fall. M. Berg.  

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ENGL-859* Topics in Victorian Literature IV

Topic:Victorian Vampires

Description: “The blood is the life!” ? Bram Stoker, Dracula
 What is it about the vampire that we find so fascinating and attractive, even, as well as terrifying or threatening? And why was this figure so important to Victorians in their effort to work through theories of self and other? The nineteenth-century was, after all, a period of social and economic instability, and the border-bending nosferatu seemed the perfect embodiment of the period’s fears—as well as its forbidden desires. This course will look at both the range among, and legacy of, Victorian vampire narratives. Possible topics of conversation include the role of the vampiric other in nineteenth-century theories of nationhood, consumerism and the mass marketplace, as well as sexual self-discipline and gender dissidence. We might, for example, look at the relationship between the monster and libidinal appetite in texts such as Paladori’s The Vampyre (1819) or Le Fanu's Carmilla (1872). The popular penny dreadfuls’ Varney the Vampire (1845-47) and Karl Marx’s Capital (1867) might help us to understand the parasitic figure as a metaphor for a new capitalist economy. We might also look at links between vampirism and the old aristocracy, or vampirism and modern technologies of mass reproduction, as represented in Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1897). The course will also likely include a final unit on adaptation, in which we will consider the monster’s neo-Victorian legacy in film (Bram Stoker’s Dracula [1992]), television (True Blood), and comics (American Vampire).
 
Assignments: regular participation, a short presentation, a final research paper (written over three stages).
Three term-hours; winter. S. B. Cameron.

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ENGL-860 Studies in Modern and Contemporary Literature and Culture
Not offered 2016-17.
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ENGL-861* Topics in Modernism I
Not offered 2016-17.
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ENGL-862* Topics in Modernism II
Not offered 2016-17.
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ENGL-863* Topics in Modernism III
Not offered 2016-17.
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ENGL-864* Topics in Modernism IV
Topic: The Literature and Culture of the Spanish Civil War Description: A study of poems, memoirs, journalism, fiction and other forms of cultural production inspired by the Spanish Civil War (1936–1939). Widely regarded as the opening act of the Second World War (though its veterans were derided as “premature anti-fascists”) the war against Franco’s Fascist-backed coup in Spain inspired volunteers from 53 nations to migrate to that country in support of the cause. As Auden famously put it, they heard the call of Spain “on remote peninsulas, / on sleepy plains, in the aberrant fishermen’s islands…”; they “heard and migrated like gulls or the seeds of a flower…. They floated over the oceans; / They walked the passes: they came to present their lives” (EA 211–12). They did so, however, in what rapidly became a lost cause. This course will examine the literature and culture, primarily but not exclusively in English, inspired by this war. Authors considered will include George Orwell, Nan Green, John Cornford, Margot Heinemann, Tom Wintringham, Jack Lindsay, Ernest Hemingway, Martha Gelhorn, Edwin Rolfe, Langston Hughes, Norman Bethune, Dorothy Livesay and Ted Allen, and we will look at anthologies of elegiac poetry (many no longer in print) from Britain, Canada and the United States. We’ll also pay attention to the small newspapers and literary magazines publishing elegiac tributes to the veterans, most notably the soldiers’ own publication, Volunteer for Liberty. We’ll give some consideration, too, to the visual art inspired by the war (the paintings of Picasso, Miro, and Dali, the documentary photography of Robert Capa), and especially to the much belated memorials produced in memory of the volunteers across Britain, the United States and Canada. Theoretical and historical questions we’ll address include why so much about this war and its volunteer effort has been forgotten by governments and mainstream media; why it has been such an object of nostalgia on the political left; why the critical language devised for the literature of the Great War is so inadequate to account for it; the place of women both in the work of the war and in its iconography; the role of the war in changing the face of journalism and in inspiring a resurgence of certain modernist literary practices rejected by the political left in the 1930s.

Three term-hours; fall. P. Rae.
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ENGL-865* Topics in Contemporary Literature and Culture I

Topic: The Refugee Crisis—Migration, Human Rights, and the Meaning of Citizenship

Description: This course is inspired by the current refugee "crisis". We shall attempt to discover how and why the figure (in both senses of the word) of the refugee dismantles current scholarship on bare life, biopolitics, risk, rights, humanitarian intervention, deterritorialization, and globalization. 1 short assignment (journals, theory grapple, or writing in a public voice) and a major research project. Attendance and voluntary and assigned participation count towards 25% of the final grade. Multi-media/digital work encouraged.

Three term-hours; spring. A. Varadharajan. 

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ENGL-866* Topics in Contemporary Literature and Culture II

Topic: Incarcerating Indigenous Peoples: Cultural and Political Perspectives

Description: This seminar will examine the concepts and reality of incarceration for Indigenous people in Canada and the role of writing. According to a 2016 investigative report by Macleans magazine, the asymmetrical jailing of the Indigenous population in Canada now exceeds the jailing of African-Americans in the USA. In fact, there are now more Indigenous people incarcerated across the country than there were Blacks jailed at the height of the apartheid in South Africa. While statistics may surprise the majority of Canadians, incarceration for Indigenous peoples comes as no surprise and extends back to European contact. How is incarceration, then, connected to the history and colonization of Indigenous peoples, and what insight can literature give us into this experience? Our examination will necessarily lead us to consider writing by Indigenous authors as a vital form of cultural expression. In his Foreword to Red Skin White Masks, Mohawk scholar Taiaiake Alfred says, “Native writers… are trying to explain to settlers that their values and the true facts of their existence are at great odds and that the Native can never be completely erased or totally assimilated. This new Indigenous Intelligentsia is trying to get settlers to understand that colonialism must and will be confronted and destroyed.” Accordingly, we will consider a variety of literary strategies that Indigenous authors have adopted to tell their stories of incarceration with the end goal of confronting and destroying colonialism; this focus will connect to related themes of diaspora, racism, violence, gender, self-determination, residential schools, language, etc. The texts for the seminar include a variety of genres, as well as critical work that serves to open the literature to analysis.

Three term-hours; winter. A. G. Ruffo.

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ENGL-867* Topics in Contemporary Literature and Culture III
Not offered 2016-17.
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ENGL-868* Topics in Contemporary Literature and Culture IV
Not offered 2016-17.
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ENGL-870 Studies in Canadian Literature
Not offered 2016-17.
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ENGL-871* Topics in Canadian Literature I
Not offered 2016-17.
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ENGL-872* Topics in Canadian Literature II
Not offered 2016-17.
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ENGL-873* Topics in Canadian Literature III
Topic: “Carrying the Burden of Peace”—Exploring Indigenous Masculinities through Story
Description: In the language of the Kanien’kehaka or Mohawk, the most common translation for the English word “warrior” is rotiskenhrakete, which means literally “carrying the burden of peace.” Kanien’kehaka theorist Taiaiake Alfred explains: “The word is made up of roti, connoting ‘he’; sken in relation to skennen, or ‘peace’; and hrakete, which is a suffix that combines the connotations of a burden and carrying.” Rotiskenhrakete is not simply an identity but a social role; it doesn’t so much individualize as identify particular responsibilities to the group; it suggests what one does as much who one is.

Ironically, the image of the Mohawk warrior has been mobilized in popular Canadian culture to represent forms of Indigenous hypermasculinity that are delinked from contemporary communal concerns and absorbed into a non-Indigenous representational tradition in which depictions of Indigenous men vacillate among a finite number of stereotypes. In a contemporary moment saturated by dehumanizing simulations of indigeneity, and at a time in which the traditional roles and responsibilities of many Indigenous men have been obfuscated by colonial dispossession, economic disenfranchisement, and systemic racism, this course examines the potential for Indigenous literary art to invigorate and imagine non-dominative and empowered Indigenous masculinities. We will employ masculinity theory and Indigenous literary theory to study poems, plays, novels, life-writings, films, and oral tales by Indigenous artists, with an eye to how these sources imagine, represent, and/or intervene in contemporary gender relations and how they pursue forms of decolonization.

Three term-hours; fall. S. McKegney.
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ENGL-874* Topics in Canadian Literature IV
Topic: Alice Munro

Description: Alice Munro’s recent Nobel Prize is the culmination of a long, unlikely, and splendid career, and part of what makes it unlikely is that short fiction is often overshadowed by the novel, in Canada and elsewhere. Even Munro’s admirers are sometimes perplexed by her recent work, which engages us in ways that we do not expect from short fiction; perhaps, as John Updike observes, Munro has gone from the art of the epiphany to the art of the panorama, and her narratives have become less linear and more elaborately arranged. If her early stories seem fully mature, they also seem conventional when contrasted with the later work. Beyond all the technical changes, however, Munro remains dedicated to her Southwestern Ontario region, which she memorably identified in an early essay as an inexhaustible subject: “This ordinary place is sufficient, everything here touchable and mysterious.” We will consider five collections from various stages of her long career. We will look closely at six stories from each collection, usually three per week.

Three term-hours; winter. T. Ware.
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ENGL-875 Studies in Postcolonial Literatures
Not offered 2016-17.
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ENGL-876* Topics in Postcolonial Literatures I
Not offered 2016-17.
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ENGL-877* Topics in Postcolonial Literatures II
Not offered 2016-17.
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ENGL-878* Topics in Postcolonial Literatures III
Not offered 2016-17.
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ENGL-879* Topics in Postcolonial Literatures IV
Not offered 2016-17.
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ENGL-880 Studies in American Literature
Not offered 2016-17.
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ENGL-881* Topics in American Literature I
Not offered 2016-17.
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ENGL-882* Topics in American Literature II
Not offered 2016-17.
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ENGL-883* Topics in American Literature III

Topic: Black Lives Matter—African-American Culture and Politics

Description: This course will focus on key events and tropes such as lynching, segregation, Civil Rights movements, hair, skin, and zoot suits (identity politics), race and police violence, and so on in order to investigate how African-American public intellectuals, artists, musicians, writers, stand up comedians, film-makers and activists have woven in and out of and contributed to the compelling issues of their times, thus reinventing American democracy in the process. We shall shift the emphasis to the cultures of African-American peoples rather than engage in an exclusively literary course. I hope to include a bit of everything elite and underground-- literary traditions, theory, politics, and sensory overload! 1 short assignment (a journal or creative writing or writing in a public voice) and a major research project. Attendance and voluntary and assigned participation count towards 25% of the final grade. Multi-media/digital work is encouraged in assigned participation and written assignments. Since orality is so crucial to African-American sensibility, spoken word/sound/music are also encouraged in these venues.

Three term-hours; winter. A. Varadharajan. 

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ENGL-884* Topics in American Literature IV
Not offered 2016-17.
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ENGL-890* Directed Cross-Disciplinary Research
This course is designed to allow M.A. students to undertake a program of graduate-level directed reading under the supervision of faculty in departments outside English Language and Literature. Permission of the external supervisor is required in advance of registration, and workload and evaluation for the course must be approved by the graduate coordinator in English to ensure consistency with English graduate course norms.
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ENGL-892* Literary Internship
This course is a pass/fail credit course which offers MA students placements in research, literacy, language and arts-related community organizations, with the aim of providing those students with job experience that is directly related to literary studies. Sample placements may include such organizations as Kingston WritersFest, or the Strathy Language Unit at Queen's University. To achieve a pass in ENGL 892, the student shall submit to the Graduate Chair a time sheet (signed by his/her placement supervisor) stating that 50 hours of work have been completed satisfactorily, make a presentation to the department about the content of this work-study project; and hand in a brief written summary report (1200 words) on the experience to the Graduate Chair. L. Ritchie.
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ENGL-895* Directed Reading
Directed study under the guidance of a faculty member in an area of the instructor’s expertise. Permission of instructor and graduate coordinator in English is required in advance of registration and is granted only under special circumstances. Workload and evaluation for the course must be approved by the graduate coordinator in English to ensure consistency with English graduate course norms. (Available only to students enrolled in the English MA program.)
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ENGL-899 Master's Thesis Research
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ENGL-900* Introduction to Professional and Pedagogical Skills II
This course is designed to acquaint doctoral students with some aspects of the teaching and scholarly skills and responsibilities of university faculty in order to prepare them for an academic career. In addition to practical training in essay marking, lecturing techniques and other teaching methods, the course will offer training in bibliographical and archival research, grant application, the academic job market, and other practical aspects of the professional study of literature. The course will consist of a number of seminars and workshops geared to the particular stage of the student’s progress over three years in the program. This course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis. Three term-hours; fall. L. Ritchie.
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ENGL-903* Research Forum I
A regularly scheduled forum in which faculty, advanced doctoral students, and visiting scholars present model research problems and methodologies for discussion. Attendance is required. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis. Various speakers.
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ENGL-950* Comparative Literature I
An introduction to comparative literary studies as currently practised, with particular emphasis on the relevance to such studies of contemporary theories of literature and criticism. This course will be given jointly with CLAS-850*, FRAN-950*.
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ENGL-951* Comparative Literature II
Specialized study in a comparative context of particular authors, themes, movements, periods, genres, literary forms, or some combination of these elements. This course will be given jointly with CLAS-851*, FRAN-951*. 
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ENGL-990* Directed Cross-Disciplinary Research
This course is designed to allow doctoral students to undertake a program of graduate-level directed reading under the supervision of faculty in departments outside English Language and Literature. Permission of the external supervisor is required in advance of registration, and workload and evaluation for the course must be approved by the graduate coordinator in English to ensure consistency with English graduate course norms.
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ENGL-995* Directed Reading
Directed study under the guidance of a faculty member in an area of the instructor’s expertise. Permission of instructor and graduate coordinator in English is required in advance of registration and is granted only under special circumstances. Workload and evaluation for the course must be approved by the graduate coordinator in English to ensure consistency with English graduate course norms. (Available only to students enrolled in the English PhD program.)
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ENGL-999 Ph.D. Thesis Research
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Graduate Studies Courses of Instruction English Language and Literature
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