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2014-2015 Academic Year
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Graduate Studies Courses of Instruction Mechanical and Materials Engineering


Mechanical and Materials Engineering
The courses described below represent those available for the current session, but courses are added from time to time. Prospective students should review the Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering web site
for the most current list of courses available and term offered.
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MECH-810* Advanced Topics in Manufacturing Engineering
A topical course in manufacturing engineering which deals with some of today's research issues from both a theoretical and pragmatic approach. Research in areas such as Flexible Manufacturing Systems, Computer Integrated Manufacturing, Statistical Quality Control, Group Technology, Just in Time Concepts, Material Removal and Forming Technology, Design for Assemble, etc. are examined based on recent literature and publications. The specific topics to be addressed each year are selected to match the student's research interest and background. Three term-hours, may be given in any term.  J. Jeswiet
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MECH-811* Lasers in Manufacturing Applications
Course presents an overview of lasers as they relate to selected manufacturing applications. Topics covered include general principles of laser operation, description of laser types used in manufacturing, and components of laser-based processing systems. Among the applications, laser machining of metals and ceramics, joining of polymers, and laser sintering are examined in greater depth. Analytical and numerical modeling techniques are briefly presented. Students will carry out a survey-based or an experimental project (the latter being subject to instructor’s approval and availability of resources). Three term-hours, lectures. G. Zak.
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MECH-812* Corrosion and Protection of Metals
Introduction to electrochemistry; thermodynamics and kinetics of corrosion processes; aqueous corrosion; anodic and cathodic processes and passivity; atmospheric corrosion and the role of contaminants; oxidation and the structure and properties of oxide films; conjoint phenomena, impingement, erosion, stress corrosion cracking, fretting, corrosion fatigue, corrosion control by coatings; inhibition, cathodic protection, and anodic protection; corrosion as a factor in design; corrosion and safety. Three term-hours; M. Shirkhanzadeh
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MECH-816* Energetics & Mechanics of Locomotion
The course covers the following topics: introduction to human locomotion, biomechanics measurements, kinematics, kinetics and mechanical energy of human walking, muscle function and metabolic energetics of human walking, biomechanical devices to assist walking. Course evaluation based on assignments, lab reports, project report, classroom presentations. Instructor: Qingguo Li.
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MECH-820* Solar Photovoltaic Materials, Cells and Systems Engineering
This course provides a graduate level introduction to solar photovoltaics: the materials science behind the technology, device physics and practical systems engineering applications. One third of this course will be dedicated to semiconductor materials for photovoltaics, including effects of microstructure, band theory, opto-electronics, and charge transport. One third will be dedicated to solar photovoltaic cell device physics:semiconductor junctions, principles of operation, structures, fabrication, and manufacturing of conventional, thin film, and “3rd generation” solar cells. The last third will be dedicated to photovoltaic systems engineering: the solar resource, power conditioning equipment and system integration techniques, mechanical elements (frames, supports, orientation mechanisms, and tracking), energy storage, residential grid-connected photovoltaic systems including engineering economics and government incentives. The course is meant for graduate students in Mechanical and Materials Engineering and Engineering Physics, while graduate students in other areas of engineering, physics and other physical sciences with a strong interest in this topic are also welcomed.
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MECH-821* Advanced Dynamics of Mechanical Systems
Mathematical modelling of the dynamics of mechanical systems using Newton's Laws, LaGrange's Equation and Hamilton's Equations; linear and non-linear systems; time-domain and frequency-domain solutions; large systems; stability; response to random excitation. Three term-hours, lectures. R.J. Anderson. 
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MECH-822* Topics in Advanced Stress and Strain Analysis
Advanced analytical and computational methods in stress and strain analysis. Topics will include effects of temperature (two and three-dimensional problems), axisymmetric problems, inelastic behaviour, energy methods, finite element methods. Three term-hours, lectures.
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MECH-823* Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS)
This course is an overview of the research in MEMS and BioMEMS, particularly including microactuators, microsensors and their applications. Fundamentals of photolithography, wet and dry etching, and surface micromachining will be covered. Design methodologies together with fabrication processes will be emphasized through case studies. A design project will be used to enhance the understanding of the relevant theories that are covered in class. By the end of the course, students will be expected to demonstrate mastery of several different modelling techniques for microsystems and understand the mechanisms of microsystems. Three term-hours, lectures. Y. Lai. 
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MECH-824* Plasticity
Deformation of solids; analysis of stress and strain; limiting states of stress in solids; theories of mechanical strength; stress-strain and stress-strain rate relations; plane strain; slip line solutions of plastic flow problems; limit analysis. Mechanics of plastic deformation in metalworking processes; friction and lubrication; thermal phenomena. Three term-hours, lectures. J. Jeswiet
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MECH-826* Experimental Vibration and Machinery Analysis
Characteristics of vibration and shock and their effects on mechanical systems and people; sensors and systems for measurement of vibratory displacement, velocity, acceleration and force; spectral analysis including applications to machinery vibration diagnostics; vibration test systems; random vibrations; modal analysis; vibration test standards; stress screening; shock testing. Three term-hours, lectures and laboratory. C. Mechefske. 
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MECH-827* Biomechanics of Human Joints and Spine
This course will start with a description of the relevant anatomy, followed by the kinematics and kinetics of synovial joints and the spine. Methods of engineering analysis will include motion analysis and different types of modelling. Applications from industrial ergonomics and biomechanical engineering in areas such as low back pain and artificial joint replacement will be discussed. Three term-hours, lectures. G. Dumas. 
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MECH-828* Biomechanics of Human Gait
An overview of the research in biomechanics of human motion with particular focus on gait analysis. Topics include measuring and analysis techniques, biomechanical modelling, and data analysis techniques. Applications include the study of normal, able-bodied gait, and the evaluation of gait pattern changes associated with osteoarthritis, and total knee replacements. The course has a laboratory component that is used to give the student the opportunity to apply the theory covered in class. Three term-hours, lectures. K. Deluzio. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor
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MECH-829* Tissue Mechanics
Methods of characterizing biological tissues for the Mechanical Engineer with no previous biology background. Histology of ligament, tendon, cartilage and bone. Viscoelasticity and classical elasticity. Current models of ligament and tendon (Fung's quasi-linear model). Linear anisotropic elastic model for bone and cartilage. Theories for strength and failure mechanisms. Three term-hours, lectures. J.T. Bryant
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MECH-831* Convective Heat Transfer
Navier-Stokes and energy equations; boundary layer equations; integral boundary layer equations; similarity and numerical solutions for laminar forced convection; integral equation solutions for laminar forced convection; laminar flow in pipes; heat transfer in turbulent forced convection; free convection; combined forced and free convection; heat transfer with change of phase; heat exchangers (Formerly MECH-931*). Three term-hours, lectures. P.H. Oosthuizen
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MECH-832* Combustion Dynamics
This course begins with a thorough review of the fundamental principles of combustion such as heat of reaction, chemical equilibrium, and chemical kinetics. Combustion aspects related to explosion phenomena such as flame acceleration, detonation wave and blast wave propagation are then covered. Finally, the single degree-of-freedom response of mechanical structures to blast wave loading will be discussed, and explosion damage mitigation techniques will be presented. Three term-hours, lectures. G. Ciccarelli.
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MECH-833* Conductive Heat Transfer
General equations of heat conduction (HC), 1,2 and 3-D steady and unsteady HC; unsteady HC with phase change; the inverse conduction problem; numerical methods for HC including finite differences and finite elements. Three term-hours, lectures. S.J. Harrison. 
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MECH-834* Fundamentals of Solar Energy Conversion for Heating and Cooling Applications
This course presents the fundamental principles of solar energy conversion, storage and distribution. Both photovoltaic and thermal energy conversion systems will be introduced; however the primary focus of the course will be on solar thermal systems for heating and cooling applications. Topics covered include the nature and prediction of the solar resource, solar collector design and performance, thermal storage, heat transport and distribution. The modeling and design of complete solar heating and cooling systems will be studied and exercises completed. Students will be required to complete a major project related to one of the above topics. Course lecture material will be augmented with laboratory exercises. S.J. Harrison. PREREQUISITE: permission of the Instructor
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MECH-837* Transport & Kinetics with Application to Fuel Cells
The fundamentals of transport phenomena and reaction kinetics are considered and applied to fuel cells, with a view to a mechanistic understanding of fuel cell operation and limitations.  Material covered includes the basic axioms of mechanics (conservation of mass, momentum, energy and charge) presented in indicial notation and applied to porous media.  Emphasis is placed on the description of porous materials and the implications of porous media on transport, including the notion of effective transport coefficients.  Ion transport in solid and polymer electrolytes due to electrochemical potential differences is considered.   Diffusion models covered include Fick’s law, Stefan Maxwell and Knudsen.  Electrochemical reaction kinetics and mechanism are covered including rate-limiting steps, exchange current density and the fundamental definition of overpotential.  The course will include individual projects.  J. Pharoah. 
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MECH-838* Civil Aviation and the Environment
Effects that the operation of civil aircraft have on the environment are considered and means of reducing these effects are considered. The generation of noise, local air pollution, the effect of engine emissions during cruise and the effect of contrails are discussed in detail. Potential changes in the design of aircraft and engines and in the way in which they are operated in order to reduce environmental effects are considered. Attention is given to the difficulties encountered in trying to balance conflicting environmental demands in arriving at solutions. While the course concentrates on the environmental effects of civil aviation, the material covered should provide a good basis for dealing with other complex environmental problems that arise in engineering. Three term-hours; P.H. Oosthuizen. 
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MECH-840* Selected Topics in Thermal Fluid Systems
This course is limited to Master’s students who already have a good background in the fundamental topics related to their areas of study and are interested in other areas not offered in existing graduate courses. Topics will be selected from the general areas of heat transfer, fluid mechanics and thermodynamics. The course will include lectures, open discussions and directed study. The course content for a student or group will be specified in writing at the beginning of the course and cannot be the same as their thesis research topic. The course mark will be based on reports and/or presentations and/or exams. Instructors: Various faculty members from within the Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering.
EXCLUSIONS: MECH-842*, MECH-843*, MECH-844*
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MECH-842* Selected Topics in Dynamics, Manufacturing and Design
This course is limited to Master’s students who already have a good background in the fundamental topics related to their areas of study and are interested in other areas not offered in existing graduate courses. Topics will be selected from the general areas of dynamics, manufacturing and design. The course will include lectures, open discussions and directed study. The course content for a student or group will be specified in writing at the beginning of the course and cannot be the same as their thesis research topic. The course mark will be based on reports and/or presentations and/or exams. Instructors: Various faculty members from within the Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering.
EXCLUSIONS: MECH-840*, MECH-843*, MECH-844*
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MECH-843* Selected Topics in Biomechanical Engineering           
This course is limited to Master’s students who already have a good background in the fundamental topics related to their areas of study and are interested in other areas not offered in existing graduate courses. Topics will be selected from the general areas of biomechanical engineering. The course will include lectures, open discussions and directed study. The course content for a student or group will be specified in writing at the beginning of the course and cannot be the same as their thesis research topic. The course mark will be based on reports and/or presentations and/or exams. Instructors: Various faculty members from within the Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering.
EXCLUSIONS: MECH-840*, MECH-842*, MECH-844*
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MECH-844* Selected Topics in Materials Engineering
This course is limited to Master’s students who already have a good background in the fundamental topics related to their areas of study and are interested in other areas not offered in existing graduate courses. Topics will be related to the structure, properties, processing and/or performance of materials. The course will include lectures, open discussions and directed study. The course content for a student or group will be specified in writing at the beginning of the course and cannot be the same as their thesis research topic. The course mark will be based on reports and/or presentations and/or exams. Instructors: Various faculty members from within the Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering.
EXCLUSIONS: MECH-840*, MECH-842*, MECH-843*
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MECH-845* Finite Element Methods in Thermo-Fluid Engineering
Introduction to the finite-element method; utilization of the direct approach for simple problems; brief discussion of the variational approach; the method of weighted residuals; Galerkin's Method; applications to heat conduction; elements and shape functions; inviscid fluid flow; creeping flow; solutions to the Navier-Stokes equation; discussion of a sample computer code. Three term-hours, lectures. P.H. Oosthuizen. 
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MECH-846* Fluid Systems Analysis
This course provides an introduction to analysis of fluid flows at the masters level. Derivation of the transport equations is completed for arbitrary control volumes in both vector and tensor forms. Inviscid flows are explored to illustrate the separate effects of inertial and viscous forces, including development of Joukowski airfoil models. Exact and approximate solutions are developed for steady and unsteady laminar flows. Boundary Layer solutions are developed by differential and integral analysis. The similarity of transport equations for thermal energy and concentration are illustrated. On completion of the course, students will be well prepared for specialized courses in convective heat transfer, turbulence, and computational fluid mechanics. Three term-hours; lectures. R.W. Sellens.
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MECH-847* Energy & Society
This course is a discussion course focused on fundamental ideas in energy and the social context of energy. It will feature an introduction to Energy Systems and fundamental thermodynamic tools to analyze these systems. Of particular emphasis will be the social context of energy: how societies emerge, organize and thrive or fail according to their energy supply. Factors which contribute to societal responses to changing contexts will also be discussed. In class participation is an essential element of this course. J. Pharaoh PREREQUISITE: Permission of the instructor   
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MECH-848* Measurement Systems I
This course focusses on practical measurement systems for Masters students in mechanical engineering.On completing this course students will be able to: Select, install, test, and program a micro controller system for data acquisition and control; Select, analyze the performance of, and apply transducers for temperature; pressure; stress, strain and force; position, velocity and acceleration; Apply basic signal conditioning in analog and digital domains; Analyze data to draw conclusions from measurements and uncertainty analysis. Conceive, Design, Implement and Operate a complete measurement system as part of a course project. The course will require a small equipment expenditure (< $100 / student) for components that will be reusable in subsequent years. Three term-hours; lectures. R.W. Sellens
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MECH-850* Simulation for Control System Design
This course examines various aspects of dynamic system simulation as applied to control system design.  Specific topics include:  simulation of thermal, hydraulic and mechanical systems, and the modeling and analysis of univariable and multivariable controllers (PID, linear quadratic, generic model, sliding mode).
Three term-hours; lectures. B.W. Surgenor.
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MECH-851* Materials Characterization
This course covers the theory and practice of materials characterization by X-ray and electron microscopy techniques. Theory includes interaction of materials with X-rays and electrons, diffraction and image formation. The following topics are discussed and illustrated by laboratory investigations: determination of crystal structure, microchemical analysis, characterization of lattice defects, determination of texture and measurement of residual stresses. Three term-hours, lecture and laboratory; M. Daymond, Z. Yao.
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MECH-857* Robotics
This course will cover kinematics of serial and parallel architecture robots; as well as the geometric, kinematic, static and dynamic criteria required for designing robot manipulators. The course will also include projects on advanced robotics topics and will conclude with the presentation of these projects, at least two presentations per student.
Three term-hours, lectures and seminars. L. Notash.
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MECH-860* Principles of Physical Metallurgy
This course considers the physical basis of microstructural evolution during processing of metal alloys. The thermodynamics and kinetics of the following phase transformations are discussed. Solidification, precipitation, cellular transformation, martensite, spinodal, decomposition, order/disorder and recrystallization. Examples are drawn mainly from the thermomechanical processing of modern microalloyed steels. Three term-hours.
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MECH-861* Principles of Metal Forming
This course examines experimental, analytical and numerical methods employed for evaluating and predicting forming limits in a variety of industrial metal forming operations. The concept of a forming limit diagram (FLD) is introduced and related to classical theories for plastic instability and failure. Constitutive equations of elastic-plastic flow are derived using a continuum mechanics approach, with additional discussion regarding issues of plastic anisotropy, damage accumulation, localization and material length scales. Three term-hours.  K. Pilkey. Not offered 2014-15.
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MECH-862* Ceramics and Other Electromechanical Transducer Materials
This course develops an understanding of the behaviour of piezoelectric and electrostrictive ceramic materials with particular reference to their use in electromechanical transducers. The properties of other electromechanical transduction materials such as piezoelectric polymers and composites, magnetostrictive materials and shape memory alloys will also be discussed briefly. The use of these materials in acoustic transducers for particular applications such as sonar, ceramic motors and actuators, active control of position, shape and vibrations, and smart structures will be reviewed. Other types of functional ceramic materials will be discussed briefly and these will include conducting, dielectric, electro-optical, magnetic and superconducting ceramics. This course will be cross-listed at RMC and at Queen's University. Three term-hours, lectures.
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MECH-864* Engineering Analysis
Methods for formulating mathematical models for engineering problems; examples drawn from dynamics, elasticity, fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and electro-mechanics; lumped-parameter and continuum models; variational techniques; boundary conditions and their effects on the character of the model; techniques for obtaining approximate solutions; methods for casting models into forms appropriate for solution on digital computers. Three term-hours, lectures. R.J. Anderson. 
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MECH-865* Computer Aided Design
Geometric modelling including the derivation of equations for non-uniform rational B-spline curves and surfaces. Geometic transformations; displacement, velocity, acceleration and force derivation through computer formulation of the equations of kinematics and dynamics. The principle of the finite element method and its application to stress analysis of mechanical components. This course is offered in conjunction with MECH-465, but has an additional report.  Three term-hours, lectures. 
EXCLUSION: MECH-465.
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MECH-871* Polymer Engineering
Material science principles will be used to examine the correlations between chemical, physical and mechanical properties to the molecular morphologies and microstructural assemblages in engineering polymers. The theory and application of the thermodynamics of rate processes will be developed for polymers in engineering applications to determine the constitutive parameters needed to make life-time predictions of polymer performance. Three term-hours. B.J. Diak.
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MECH-874* Functional Ceramics
This course is designed to provide fundamental understanding of the relationship between the crystallographic and microstructural properties of functional ceramics and their properties and application. The emphasis is placed on the mechanisms of conduction in ionic solids, semiconductors and superconductors along with the structure, properties and application of ferroelectric, magnetic and optical materials. The breadth and importance of this class of ceramics in modern electronic industries is reviewed. This course is offered in conjunction with MECH-474, but has additional reading and work assignments. Three term-hours. V.D. Krstic. Not offered 2014-15.
EXCLUSION:   MECH-474  
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MECH-875* Structural Ceramics
This course covers fundamental understanding of the mechanical response of ceramics and brittle materials subjected to external stress. The emphasis is placed on developing the relationships between microstructure and mechanical properties in ceramics and brittle materials. Topics covered in this course include linear-elastic behaviour, the role of crack-opening displacement in our understanding of the effects of porosity, grain size and cracks on strength and toughness, as well as the role of residual stresses in the design of super strong materials. The structure and mechanical properties of nano-crystalline ceramics and metals will also be covered. This course is offered in conjunction with MECH-475, but has additional reading and work assignments. Three term-hours. 
EXCLUSION:   MECH-475 
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MECH-876* Science of Sintering and Power Processing
This course is designed to combine theories of mass transfer, consolidation and microstructural development in particulate materials. Specifically, the concept of neck formation, the driving force for sintering and mechanisms of sintering will be discussed and applied to specific systems. Solid state, liquid phase and reaction sintering will be covered along with recent examples of sintering in oxide, carbide and nitride ceramics. Three term-hours.
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MECH-877* Fundamentals of Crystal Growth and Solidification
Some of the topics discussed are: nature of the solid/liquid interface, nucleation of solid in a liquid, equilibrium and non-equilibrium shapes, attachment kinetics, solute partition at a solid-liquid interface, solute transport in the liquid and solid, macroscopic segregation, ultra-rapid solidification and metastability, generation of defects in crystals, other techniques to produce crystals. Three term-hours.
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MECH-878* Dislocation Theory
This course attempts to cover the basic derivations from elasticity theory, the properties of dislocations in crystalline materials, and their role in inelastic material behaviour. This introduction should enable one to comprehend, examine, and criticize current literature on the mechanical behaviour of materials. Topics include: a brief introduction to applied elasticity theory; elastic stress fields of dislocations and their interactions with external ones; the role of a particular crystal structure on the properties and motion of dislocations. The use of dislocation mechanics in the theories of creep, fracture, and yield points will be discussed along with other topics as time permits. Three term-hours. B. J. Diak.
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MECH-883* Nuclear Materials
A nuclear reactor presents a unique environment in which materials must perform. In addition to the high temperatures and stresses to which materials are subjected in conventional applications, nuclear materials are subjected to various kinds of radiation that affect their performance, and often this dictates a requirement for a unique property that is not relevant in conventional applications. The effects of the radiation may be direct or indirect. This course considers materials typically used in nuclear environments, the unique conditions to which they are subjected, the basic physical phenomena that affect their performance and the resulting design criteria for reactor components made from these materials. This course is offered in conjunction with MECH-483*, but has additional assignments and reading. Three term-hours, lectures.
EXCLUSION:  MECH-483*
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MECH-884* Topics in Materials Engineering
A timely topic of interest to materials engineers will be presented. The topics will vary from year to year. Three term-hours, lectures. A.K. Pilkey, Visiting Lecturers. Not offered 2014-15. 
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MECH-892* Industry-Linked Project (Part 1)
Students work on individual one-term research or development projects. Each project is defined by the academic project supervisor. The project is linked to a supporting company partner. Course evaluation is based on a final written report (typically 30-40 pages) and an end of term seminar presentation. Instructors: Various faculty members from within the Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering. This course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis.
Exclusions: MECH-898 - Project, CMAS-898 – Project
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MECH-893* Industry-Linked Project (Part 2)
Students work on individual one-term research or development projects that are the natural progression of projects started in MECH-892*. The project is linked to a supporting company partner. Course evaluation is based on a final written report (typically 50-60 pages) and an end of term seminar presentation. Instructors: Various faculty members from within the Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering. This course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis. Prerequisite: MECH 892 – Industry-Linked Project (Part 1)
Exclusions: MECH-898 - Project, CMAS-898 – Project.
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MECH-894* Internship
Students work on a one-term (typically summer) internship at a sponsoring company site. The internship involves the student continuing with the same project work started in MECH-892 and continued throughout MECH-893*. The work will typically be conducted exclusively at the supporting partner company site. Course evaluation is based on a final written report (typically 40-50 pages) and an end of term project seminar presentation. Instructors: Various faculty members from within the Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering. Prerequisite: MECH-893* – Industry-Linked Project (Part 2)
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MECH-896* Professional Development for MEng Students
This course is designed to develop professional skills that expand on a student’s existing technical and non- technical skills, as relevant to a future career in engineering. The topics covered will encompass aspects of project management; leadership and crisis management; written and oral communication; engineering integrity and ethics; and social responsibility. A key feature of the course will be the use of a simulation game in project management for both instruction and assessment. This course is open only to MEng students. Three term-hours; lectures and seminars. B.W. Surgenor. PREREQUISITE: Permission of the instructor.  
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MECH-897, 997 Graduate Seminar
Each research full-time graduate student is required to regularly attend the graduate seminar program and to give at least one seminar during their program at Queen's. M.Sc./M.Sc.(Eng.) students  are required to take MECH-897 and Ph.D. students are required to take MECH-997. The content of the seminar is to be developed in cooperation with the student's supervisor. The seminar will be evaluated by assigned faculty and a pass/referred decision will be recorded. The student must obtain a pass grade to clear this course requirement. The evaluation process for the seminar is defined in the departmental procedures. This course carries no course credit but is a degree requirement in the Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering.
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MECH-898* Master's Project
weight= 3.0 credit units.
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MECH-899 Master's Thesis Research
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MECH-924* Finite Element Analysis of Non-Linear Solids
This course presents the formulation and use of finite element models for the analysis of a broad range of non-linear solid materials (plastics, metals, elastomers) subject to large deformations. Basic concepts from continuum mechanics (suffix notation, large strain theory, constitutive relations) are covered in order to provide a basis for the formulation of these models and for the interpretation of results. Testing procedures for the determination of non-linear material properties, required for model input, are also covered. Example analyses are conducted with commercial non-linear finite element code. Three term-hours; lectures.  I. Y. Kim. PREREQUISITE: CIVL-821* or equivalent.
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MECH-932* Advanced Topics in Convective Heat Transfer Analysis
This course is, basically, a continuation of MECH-931* but may be taken by any student who has had adequate preparation. Among the main topics considered are: Analysis of laminar and turbulent free convective flows; local similarity methods in heat transfer; heat transfer with film condensation; prediction of turbulent Prandtl numbers; mixed (or combined) convection; combined heat and mass transfer; heat transfer in compressible flows. Three term hours, lectures. P.H. Oosthuizen
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MECH-933* Computational Fluid Dynamics I
Governing equations; laws of flux and sources; modelling of physical processes such as turbulence, species transport etc. Finite difference methods, including discretisation and higher-order differencing schemes; influence patterns; solution methods; flow classification; examples. Three term hours; lectures. A. Pollard
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MECH-934* Computational Fluid Dynamics II
The objective of this course is to teach students to understand the potential and limitations of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), develop advanced solution methods for fluid-dynamics problems, and run commercial software in a critical manner. The course begins by presenting various forms of numerical approximations of the governing equations. An in-depth analysis of iterative methods to solve linear systems will follow. Numerical methods for the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations will be presented, with emphasis on numerical stability and on conservation properties. Three term-hours lectures; U. Piomelli. PREREQUISITE: MECH-933* or permission of the instructor. 
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MECH-935* Turbulence Simulations
The objective of this course is to analyze numerical techniques for the simulation of turbulent flows. Emphasis will be placed on the understanding of the role of modeling and numerical errors, and on the development of "best practices" to validate and establish confidence in the numerical results. The course begins with a review of the governing equations for turbulent flows, of the role of turbulent eddies, and of the statistical quantities used to characterize turbulent flows. The important features of numerical methods will then be examined.An extensive review of the potential, requirements, achievements and limitations of direct simulation, large-eddy simulation and solution of the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations will form the core of the course. Time permitting, additional topics such as Lagrangian particle tracking, or applications to compressible flows will be covered. U. Piomelli.  Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.   
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MECH-936* Radiative Heat Transfer
This course covers the following topics related to heat transfer by thermal radiation: fundamentals of thermal radiation, blackbody thermal radiation, radiative properties of real materials, surface to surface exchange of diffuse radiation, numerical solution of diffuse radiation problems, non-diffuse and specular radiation from surfaces, spectral radiation, radiation with conduction and convection, radiation in absorbing, emitting and scattering media, gas volume radiation, surface-volume radiation, selected applications. Three term hours, lectures. A.M. Birk.  Not offered 2014-15.
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MECH-940* Selected Topics in Thermal-Fluids Engineering
This course is intended for those Ph.D. students who already have a good background in the fundamental topics related to their research and are interested in other areas not offered in existing graduate courses. Topics can be selected from the general areas of heat transfer, fluid mechanics and thermodynamics. The course will include lectures, open discussions and directed study. The course content for a student or group must be specified in writing at the beginning of the course and cannot be the same as their thesis research topic. The course mark will be based on reports and presentations by each student. Three term hours, lectures. A.M. Birk. Not offered 2014-15. 
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MECH-941* Turbulent Flow
Introduction; Reynolds averaging; turbulent transport equations; turbulence modelling; statistics and dynamics of turbulence; turbulent diffusion; structure of turbulent flows; numerical and experimental methods. Three term-hours; lectures. A. Pollard.
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MECH-942* Selected Topics in Dynamics, Manufacturing and Design
This course is intended for PhD students who already have a good background in the fundamental and advanced topics related to their research and are interested in other areas not offered in existing graduate courses. Topics will be selected from the general areas of dynamics, manufacturing and design. The course will include lectures, open discussions and directed study. The course content for a student or group will be specified in writing at the beginning of the course and cannot be the same as their thesis research topic. The course mark will be based on reports and presentations by each student. B. Surgenor.
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MECH-943* Selected Topics in Biomechanical Engineering
This course is intended for PhD students who already have a good background in the fundamental and advanced topics related to their research and are interested in other areas not offered in existing graduate courses. Topics will be selected from the general areas of biomechanical engineering. The course will include lectures, open discussions and directed study. The course content for a student or group will be specified in writing at the beginning of the course and cannot be the same as their thesis research topic. The course mark will be based on reports and presentations by each student.
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MECH-944* Selected Topics in Materials Engineering
This course is intended for PhD students who already have a good background in the fundamental and advanced topics related to their research and are interested in other areas not offered in existing graduate courses. Topics will be selected from the general area of materials engineering. The course will include lectures, open discussions and directed study. The course content for a student or group will be specified in writing at the beginning of the course and cannot be the same as their thesis research topic. The course mark will be based on reports and presentations by each student.
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MECH-983* Performance of Nuclear Power Reactor Components
Metal components in nuclear power reactors change shape under the influence of the fast neutron flux, temperature and stress to which they are subjected. The phenomena that cause these shape changes are irradiation creep, irradiation growth, and irradiation-induced swelling. They are accompanied by changes in microstructure, and the evolution of the observed microstructural features is intimately related to the dimensional changes. This course describes the phenomena observed in two important classes of nuclear materials (zirconium alloys used in thermal power reactors and austenitic stainless steels used in fast breeder reactors), the physical processes believed to cause these phenomena, and some of the outstanding issues to be resolved. Mathematical models are presented that provide a qualitative understanding of the behaviour. Three term-hours, lectures. R. Holt.  PREREQUISITES: MECH-483* or MECH-883*, MECH-878*
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MECH-984* Modeling the Deformation of Crystalline Solids
Descriptions of crystal plasticity from continuum mechanics to lower length scales are examined. Specifically, analytical methods and computational tools are developed to describe the microstructural evolution and stress response to deformation of single and polycrystalline metals. Specific topics include dislocation micro-mechanics and microstructural evolution, constitutive relations, large strain and texture evolution, failure and fracture, and temperature and rate effects. Three term-hours, lectures. B.J. Diak and A.K. Pilkey. PREREQUISITES: MECH-861*, MECH-878*
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MECH-999 Ph.D. Thesis Research
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ADMI Courses - Technology and Processes Stream 

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DM-801*  Metal Forming & Computer Modelling of Sheet Metal Forming
Module 1. Metal Forming - The module begins with a brief introduction to the theory of plasticity, directly applicable to the mathematical and physical analysis of problems in metal forming. A discussion of tribology and material attributes follows. Metallurgical phenomena, accompanying hot and cold forming of metals, are discussed. Application to bulk metal forming (rolling, extrusion, drawing and forging) and sheet metal forming (deep drawing, stretch forming, hydro-forming) are considered. The use and limitations are demonstrated. Examples from laboratory experiments and from industrial applications are used to complement the presentation. 
Module 2. Computer Modeling of Sheet Metal Forming - This module covers numerical simulation techniques used to accurately and efficiently simulate industrial sheet and tube forming processes. A variety of finite element-based techniques will be considered including explicit dynamic, implicit and so-called single- or multi-step methods. The course will be of interest to industrial stamping and hydroforming practitioners, as well as engineers involved in crash worthiness modeling due to the extensive treatment of explicit dynamic finite element modeling.  (Lead Instructor: John Lenard, Waterloo)

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DM-802* Computer Modelling of Forming and Impact
This course will cover numerical simulation techniques used to accurately and efficiently simulate industrial forming processes and impact events, including vehicle crash worthiness and the relationship to occupant safety. A variety of finite element-based techniques will be considered including explicit dynamic and implicit methods. This course will be of interest to industrial stamping and hydroforming practitioners, as well as engineers involved in crash worthiness and occupant simulation modelling.  (Lead Instructors: M. Worswick, D. Cronin, Waterloo).
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DM-803* Advanced Machining Systems
This course will deal with the major components of Intelligent Machining:
1. Predictive modeling of machining processes
- - Prediction of process variables such as forces, torque's, power and tool wear
- Simulation of machining dynamics for chatter prediction
2. Sensors
- Review of sensing techniques
- Signal processing methodologies for monitoring cutting processes
- Examples, including tool breakage, tool wear and chatter monitoring
3. Process Controls
- Various approaches for process control in machining applications
- interface with position control
- state-of-the-art open architecture control
(Lead Instructor: Mohammed Elbestawi, McMaster)
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DM-809*   Conceptual Design Studio 
A large-scale object will be designed to satisfy commercial specifications.  Perspectives on elements of initial sizing, integration of engineering science, safety, social context, valences, windows of opportunity, tacit assumptions, manufacturability, and cost analysis, will be developed. Because of its rich window of opportunity and straight-forward context, an advanced aircraft will be the large-scale design object. Accordingly, technical aspects of geometry selection, avionics, aerodynamics, propulsion integration, stability and control, loads, structures, and its manufacturing will be integrated "just-in-time" into the design experience. (Lead Instructor: Brian Thompson, Western Ontario)
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DM-810*   Intelligent Manufacturing
The objectives of this course are to develop a basic understanding of machine intelligence and explore modern tools in designing intelligent manufacturing systems. Through the lectures, on-site visit, reading assignments, and course project(s) the participants will examine how knowledge-based systems (KBSs) and learning systems can effectively improve the performance of machine tools, work cells, and overall manufacturing enterprises.  At the end of the course each student should be able to:
- Identify the basic components of manufacturing automation
- View modern manufacturing automation as an intelligent system
- Summarize the benefits of flexible manufacturing and open-architecture controllers
- Describe how laser material removal processes can improve product quality
- Understand how knowledge-based system (KBS) technology can improve manufacturing enterprises
- Appreciate the role of knowledge acquisition in designing intelligent automation
- Describe the basic operation of artificial neural networks (ANNs)
- Design simple neural networks for signal processing, control, and pattern classification applications
- Understand the essentials of fuzzy sets and systems
- Apply fuzzy logic to intelligent control, production planning and scheduling
- Evaluate object oriented and relational data bases
- Describe fuzzy data mining and clustering
(Lead Instructor: George Knopf, Western Ontario)
 
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DM-811*  Design for Manufacturability
Design for Manufacturability (DFM) involves a variety of systematic design approaches that ensure all elements of the product life-cycle from conception through to final disposal are addressed by the engineer during the product design process. In this course, the participants will develop an understanding of the various tools and techniques used to design high-quality products at the lowest possible cost. General topics to be covered in the course include: Design for Manufacture (DFM): Product life cycle; engineering design methods; general approaches to DFM; integrating design and manufacturing data; managing the engineering design process; organizational barriers to DFM. Design for Competitive Advantage: Design to cost; time-to-market; time-to-breakeven; design to value; mass customization. DFM and Quality Engineering: Customer needs and expectations; Quality Function Deployment (QFD); product and process FMEA (Failure Mode and Effects Analysis); Taguchi methods (TM). Design for X (DFX): Design for assembly (DFA); design for reliability; design for environment; design for human factors; software tools for DFM. (Lead Instructor: George Knopf, Western Ontario)

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DM 812* Finite Element Analysis for Design Engineers
A course on Finite Element Analysis (FEA) as a productivity tool.  Topics covered include FEA powers and shortcomings, avoiding common pitfalls and misconceptions, alternate and preferred modelling approaches, reliability of results, integrating FEA with other Computer Aided Design (CAD) tools and finally streamlining FEA and CAD with FEA oriented Solid Modelling practices. (Lead Instructor: R. Buchal, Western Ontario)
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DM-813*  System Maintenance 
The course will cover tools and methodologies necessary to achieve a program of maintenance excellence such that assets within an organization are cared for through sound and timely decision-making. The methodology of Reliability Centered Maintenance will be used to describe a process that can be used to establish maintenance plans. The main thrust of the course will be to focus on techniques, such as Weibull analysis and life cycle costing, that can be used to optimize a range of decisions associated with systems maintenance.  Exercises will be undertaken using the RelCode, PERDEC, AGE/CON and EXAKT software for the optimization of physical asset maintenance decisions. The lectures will be supplemented by case studies.
(Lead Instructor: Andrew Jardine, Toronto)
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DM-814* Rapid Mechanical Design             

Rapid Mechanical Design addresses all aspect of mechanical design, including consideration for end-of-life issues, with the focus and emphasis of the course being on rapid product development.  In this course, the participants will be introduced to the various state-of-the-art methodologies and off-the-shelf tools and facilities for rapid design. The course will have an introductory section on a limited set of classical design topics in order to prepare the students for the in-depth discussion of the advanced topics on rapid prototyping.
 
The introductory topics will include: Manufacturing Management Strategies, Concurrent Engineering, Conceptual Design, and Design for X. The advanced rapid-design topics are categorized into virtual and physical prototyping. Virtual prototyping topics include: Geometric Modeling (including major CAD software packages), Computer-Aided-Engineering (CAE) Analysis, Engineering Optimization, Design of Experiments, and Virtual Reality. Physical prototyping topics include: Introduction to Polymerization, Sintering, Casting, and Chemical Machining, Material-Additive Layered Prototyping (including Photolithography, Sintering, Deposition, Lamination, and Laser-Induced-Fusion Based Rapid-Prototyping Systems, Material-Removal-Based Prototyping, and Reverse Engineering.  (Lead Instructors: Beno Benhabib, Toronto, Gene Zak, Queen's) 

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DM 815* System Simulation
System Simulation as a methodology for developing computer models of a production system, in order to provide a 3-D graphic representation of the system and a test bed for improvements to reduce cost and increase throughput.  Concepts required for the development of these models are covered, including techniques for modeling system random factors and analyzing the results. (Lead Instructor:  D. Frances, Toronto)
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DM-816*  Design Methodologies 
This course will introduce students to the breadth of the field of "design methods". While there are many methods of design; not all of them work well in every case. The goal of the course is to give students an appreciation for different design methods, an understanding of how different design methods can yield very different results, and how to select appropriate methods for specific cases. Topics include:
- The role of design methods in product development and engineering
- The coupling between industrial design, engineering design, and product development
- Generic design processes, stages & gates
- Design problem analysis & requirements engineering
- The House of Quality
- Methods for design problem solving
- Design for Manufacture & Assembly, Life-Cycle Analysis, and Sustainability
- Principles & Aphorisms of Designing
- Axiomatic Design and Design Optimization
(Lead Instructor: Ron Venter, Toronto)
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DM-817*  Ergonomic Design
This course provides an overview of ergonomic problems that are addressed in engineering design: including biomechanical, physical and physiological issues.  Case studies will range form the design of vehicle cockpits to process control rooms, from industrial manual materials handling tasks to human direct robots, and from domestic tools to biomechanical devices.  Specific topics include: anthropometry, work space design, environmental conditions (light, noise, humidity, temperature, motion), physiology, materials handling capacity, gender issues, tool design, product design and structured ergonomic design evaluation techniques.
(Lead Instructor: Tim Bryant, Queen's)
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DM-818*  Product Design & Development 
The course is intended to provide graduate engineering students with a broad sense of the issues and methodologies involved in Product Design. Emphasis is placed on creativity in the design and development of readily useable products and systems intended for manufacture in quantity for consumer and commercial markets. The course covers a broad range of product development issues aside from those that are strictly technical, including appeal, appropriate functional aspects, viability and durability. The course addresses the following issues:
- Development of a design vocabulary and Design Value System
- Conceptual thinking and preparation of concept
- Influence of product planning and marketing on design process
- Importance of teamwork and interdependence on other disciplines
- New ideas, inventions, & technologies influencing design approach
- Human factors, ergonomics and user issues affecting design directions
- Design Economics - the “big picture”
- Appropriate (for purpose) material selections
- Selection of appropriate manufacturing / fabrication methods
- Proactive presentation of design concepts and related information
- Dealing with market response, re-evaluation and modification
(Lead Instructor - Claude Gidman, Toronto)
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DM-819* Dynamics and Vibration in Engineering Design
The course is intended to provide students with the ability to understand and incorporate dynamics and vibration into their designs as predictors throughout the stages of the design process and as analysis tools during prototype testing. Techniques of dynamic model development ranging from Newton-Euler Equations to Lagrange’s Equations to modern Multi-Body Dynamics (MBD) techniques are presented and compared. The design utility of the derived models, from simple linear to complex non-linear and 3D, and what they bring to the design process is presented.  Examples, drawn primarily from vehicle dynamics and suspension design, are used to emphasize the practical use of dynamics and vibration in the design process. The A’GEM multibody dynamics software will be provided for analysis sessions.  (Lead Instructor: Ron Anderson, Queen's)
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DM-820*  Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing
Geometric Dimensioning & Tolerancing (GD&T) is the standard method of dimensional control notation for use on Mechanical Engineering drawings in all advanced industries in North America and abroad.  This course reviews conventional tolerancing and standard fits and includes a discussion of manufacturing processes and how they impact tolerance choices in design. It then introduces the advantages of the functional GD&T approach. The ASME/ANSI Y14.5M standard is used as the primary authority, with reference to related ISO standards.  Major topics covered include datums, form, orientation, location and size controls, material condition modifiers, etc. Computer Aided Design (CAD) implementation of GD&T is presented using Autodesk Mechanical Desktop and the Origin International CheckMate software. Programs are written using Dimensional Measuring Interface Standard (DMIS), and used with Coordinate Measuring Machines (CMMs) to measure and analyze inspection data from actual parts.  Theory on mathematical data fitting, CMM error compensation, and uncertainty analysis is included at a level appropriate to graduate studies. Use of conventional touch trigger as well as scanning and laser-digitizing sensors is covered.
(Lead Instructor: Allan Spence, McMaster)
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DM-821*  Forensic Engineering & Failure Analysis
The course provides participants with the fundamentals necessary to understand and appreciate investigation methods into engineering failures.  Topics to be considered include:
- the definition of potential sources of failure in engineered materials
- understanding failures due to natural causes, fire, impacts, design, manufacture and service conditions
- procedures for investigation of structural, materials, environmental, service and design-related failures
- introduction to principles of materials selection for prevention of mechanical failures
- characterization techniques used to assess materials structure and chemistry
- demonstration of fundamental principles through real case studies to understand liabilities and legal issues
(Lead Instructor - Doug Perovic, Toronto)
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DM-822*  Mechatronics Engineering
Mechatronics is the integration of mechanical, electrical, computer and control engineering. This course deals with the analytical tools required to design, model, analyze and control mechatronic systems. Properties of linear and nonlinear systems, system identification methods, process modelling, sensor and actuators, computer interfacing, computer control of machines and processes (PLC and PC based). Laboratories will include PLC based automation applications and PC based advanced robotics.
(Lead Instructor: Brian Surgenor, Queen's)
 
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DM-823* Sensors, Actuators and Interfacing
This course presents the theory and design implementation of several types of sensors and actuators. Sensors discussed include solid-state optical sensors, temperature sensors, velocity sensors, piezoelectric sensors and accelerometers, strain and force sensors, analogue and digital position sensors, pressure and flow sensors, and magnetometers and Hall sensors. Theory and modelling of several common actuators including different electric motors, hydraulic and pneumatic motors and cylinders, as well as piezoelectric and magnetostrictive actuators are presented.   Component integration, design considerations, and interfacing are studied through examples selected from applications of machine tools, mechatronics, robotics, aerospace systems, and ground vehicles.  Four laboratory projects in robotics, vision, pneumatics, and hydraulic systems reinforce understanding of the topics.
(Lead Instructor: Amir Khajepour, Waterloo)
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DM-824*  Design: Materials Selection
The theme of this course is how to integrate materials selection into the design process at an early stage.  The objectives are: 1) to upgrade students’ knowledge of mechanical design, engineering materials, failure mechanisms and materials selection in design for service; 2) to develop their skills in materials selection methodologies and the use of sources of information on materials properties.  
This course is directed towards practicing engineers of all disciplines who are involved with design, manufacturing, maintenance and regulation. (Lead Instructors: D. Boyd, K. Pilkey, Queen's).
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DM-825*  Computer Aided Design
This course addresses both the best practices and theoretical basis for modern Computer Aided Design solid modeler software and mechanism solvers. Significant hands-on experience will be obtained using Autodesk Inventor and MSC DynamicDesigner. Demonstrations will illustrate similarities to other widely used commercial software. Project work is based on design of steering and suspension for a model (toy) car including dynamic response over terrain. Interior seating will be designed using sculptured surfaces.  Module One will cover part design including 2D sketching, constraints, and parametric design, drawing generation, and an introduction to assembly modeling, exploded view presentations, and kinematic mechanism modeling. Module Two advances into dynamic mechanism modeling, sculptured surface design, and relevant mathematical theory. It is anticipated that participants will be able to complete the hands-on portion of the course during the module times. The theory will require some homework, and will be examined through in-class quizzes.
(Lead Instructor: Allan Spence, McMaster)
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DM-826* Optimization of Energy Efficiencies in Industrial Processes
The course covers the fundamentals of industrial energy management and the technical procedures required for assessing energy saving opportunities (ESOs) in equipment and systems found in almost every industrial facility. These procedures can be applied on existing equipment or systems and used for sizing and selecting new equipment. The required background in heat transfer, fluid mechanics, and thermodynamics to support the analysis and the assessment of the various ESOs is also covered.(Lead Instructor; Mohamed S. Hamed, McMaster) (ADMI course number DM0824)
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DM-827* Renewable Energy Systems
The world is faced with severe negative consequences of the present non-renewable energy systems. Carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration in the atmosphere is constantly increasing and the effects of global warming are becoming more evident. There is a growing awareness of the opportunities and potential impact that renewable energy technologies and management may have in the short and longer term. The course covers the fundamentals of different renewable energy systems (RES) including biomass, hydropower, geothermal, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics. It covers the basics of performance and economic analysis of RES. It also covers the use of RES in achieving sustainability in high performance green buildings and details of the LEED rating system for new construction and existing buildings. The course also introduces the use of computer programs for simulating and analyzing RES. (Lead Instructor: Mohamed S. Hamed, McMaster University)
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DM-828* Lean Manufacturing, Principles, Applications and Implementation
The course provides an introduction to Lean Manufacturing and covers the basic principles on which Lean practices are built. The main focus is on Lean from an Industrial engineering and management science perspective. The course covers an extensive set of Lean tools and outlines their application in a manufacturing environment with the goal of achieving measurable objectives related to operational effectiveness. Basic tools will be applied in a major course project that targets an area for improvement in the workplace or in a Lean project developed through discussion with the instructor. Advanced topics will also be reviewed. (Lead Instructor: Stephen Veldhuis, McMaster University.
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ADMI Courses - Business and Management Stream 
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DM-863*  Financial & Managerial Accounting 
Whether working in the public or private sector, engineers are constrained by financial realities. Knowledge of accounting - how it works, its assumptions, and its usefulness - is an essential prerequisite to informed to informed participation in business decision-making. The purpose of this course is therefore to provide a sound basic understanding of accounting - the "language of business" - and to develop skills in the interpretation and use of accounting information. The course will provide a thorough understanding of how accounting information is used in organizations. We briefly consider reporting to external parties (financial accounting), and consider in more depth the measurement of product and activity cost (cost accounting), and the use of cost information for decision-making, planning, budgeting, and the measurement of performance (management accounting).
(Lead Instructor:  David Sharp, Western Ontario)
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DM-864*  Principles of Technical Communication 
The focus of this course is mastery of the fundamental elements of all effective professional communication: assessing the communicative situation, understanding the needs and expectations of the audience, creating an effective and suitable message, and projecting confidence and competence through an appropriate communication style. The course combines theoretical understanding with practical application in four areas of communicative competence: reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Students will prepare and present a variety of messages and will be involved in the critical appraisal of the messages of others.
(Lead Instructor:  Jennifer MacLennan, Western Ontario)
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DM-865*  Business to Business Marketing 
The objectives of the course are to provide an introduction to the basic theories and concepts in marketing, with an emphasis on businesses marketing to other businesses (B2B marketing); to develop an effective decision- making framework to address practical problems and issues in marketing; to illustrate the need to integrate marketing decision-making with the other functional areas within an organization; and to offer specific insights into selected marketing contexts; e.g., services, new/high technology, developing and managing relationships, and marketing in the global environment. Emphasis will be placed on e-business and how the Internet and the World Wide Web have greatly changed the role, efficiency and effectiveness of the marketing function, especially in the business-to-business marketplace.
(Lead Instructor:  David Blenkhorm, Western Ontario)
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DM-866*  Strategic Management of Technology 
This course focuses on the strategic management of technology and innovation established firms. We take an evolutionary process perspective.  The fundamental ideas underlying the perspective are:
- that a firm's technology strategy emerges from its technological competencies and capabilities
- that the strategy is shaped by evolutionary external (environmental) and internal (organizational) forces.
The course draws on strategic management, economics and organization theory for analytical tools to address important challenges faced by senior and middle managers in technology based firms.  The course is practice oriented; case studies of various real life situations are analyzed in-depth and complemented with specific action recommendations.
(Lead Instructor:  Thomas Astebro, Waterloo)
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DM-867*  Manufacturing Business Strategy 
This course introduces students to the current theories used for business strategy in a manufacturing environment including product streams, theory of constraints, lean/agile manufacturing, supply chain management, and reliability/maintenance programs. The fundamentals, tools, advantages and disadvantages for each strategy are examined.  First hand interaction with various analytical tools will be a major feature of the course. Case studies featuring automotive related industries and their suppliers will be used to highlight the potential uses and value of the product stream approach. Participants will have the opportunity to use the analytical tools to conduct additional analyses and construct their own business strategy models.
(Lead Instructor: Gian Frontini, Queen's)
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DM-871*  Manufacturing Management - Organizational Behaviour 
The study of formal organizations as well as the behaviour of people within those organizations in work settings that are relevant to manufacturing management will be highlighted throughout the course.  Attention will be directed to the interrelation of behavioural phenomena among individual, group, and organizational levels. In addition, concepts such as group dynamics, motivation, job and organizational design, job stress, conflict management, leadership, environment, and technology will be discussed and their relevance to organizational behaviour and administrative theory examined.  The instruction format will involve lectures, cases, experiential exercises, and class discussions. Topic experts will also be brought-in to share their knowledge and experiences with the class.
(Instructor:  Vishwanath Baba, McMaster)
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DM-872*  Management Skills Development 
The course is based on the notion that managerial competence is a function of knowledge, skills, and experience relevant to management. The purpose of this course is to develop skills in diagnosing situations that require change in organizational life and to facilitate such changes. Within the context of organizational behavior, the course will emphasize the acquisition of personal, interpersonal, and group skills that are required to manage people effectively in modern organizations. The interface between theory and practice in the fields of organizational behavior and human resources management will serve as the backdrop for management training in this course. The orientation of the course will be targeted toward managing superiors, peers and subordinates through a process of change. The focus will be at the individual and group levels of analyses. The course is delivered in a workshop format with the emphasis on the acquisition and development of people skills ready to be implemented in a manufacturing context. This is a course dealing primarily with the acquisition of skills and the student is expected to have a basic grasp of issues, concepts, and applications of general management and organizational behaviour in order to fully benefit from what is offered here. At the end of the course participants will have acquired a basic understanding of the skills necessary for effective management of human resources in an organization.
 (Instructor:  Vishwanath Baba, McMaster)

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DM-880*  International Business 
This course analyzes the international business environment and surveys managerial issues associated with international operations.  Module 1. focuses on the global environment, including the institutions of globalization - the WTO, IMF, European Union etc.  Module 2. examines how firms operate in this environment.  Specifically we study how strategy, marketing, accounting, finance, operations and human resources are affected by geography and culture. Each module includes a project assignment aimed at developing familiarity with international economic information and news sources, in print and on the Internet.
(Lead Instructor: James Tiesson, McMaster)
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DM-881*  Technical Entrepreneurship & Innovation 
Technological entrepreneurship involves much more than having a good business idea and writing a solid business plan. This course will introduce new venture creation as a process intimately connected to new product innovation and design. The successful introduction of a new product or service within an existing or new business requires several important steps: identification, evaluation, and selection of opportunities; planning and financing the new venture or project; and executing the new venture or project plan. A combination of lectures, assignments, and experienced guest speakers will be used to explore each of these steps in a practical manner that will be interesting and useful to any professional engineer, entrepreneur, or manager.
(Lead Instructor:  Joel Adams, Western Ontario)

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DM-885*  Advanced Project Management 
Advanced Project Management builds from the basic tools of project management to introduce participants to the reality of managing projects within the context of engineering organizations that can be complex, where multiple projects may be in place, where membership is drawn from a variety of specialization's and individual differences abound and where team-based functioning is the norm.  The course will address issues such as management of multiple projects, individual differences, project leadership, working in teams, and change management. Case studies of managed projects will be used in the course.
(Lead Instructor:  Harvey Kolodny, Toronto)

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DM-886*  Basic Tools for Technology Transfer 
In a knowledge-based economy, successful organizations develop technologies and intellectual capital that may give rise to competitive advantage.  The purpose of this course is to provide students with basic tools that will allow them to identify such technologies and intellectual capital in organizations, protect that capital by applying the necessary types of legal protection such as patents and copyright registrations and to then profit by transferring it to others or otherwise creating new entrepreneurial activities within the organization.
(Lead Instructor: Marcel Mongeon, McMaster)
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DM-890*  Logistics & Supply Chain Management
The trend toward an integrated world economy and global competitive arena is forcing companies to develop strategies for designing products for a global market and maximizing the firm's resources in producing them. Planning and operating in the global arena and the Internet era requires new management skills such as developing a truly global network of warehouses, distribution centres and consolidation points, optimizing multiple transport service types, and designing information and communication systems that integrate the supply chain. Logistics and Supply Chain Management (L&SCM) is a course intended for students with strong interests in developing skills and knowledge within a global operations and logistics framework. In particular, this course will offer the opportunity to discuss how the Internet has enhanced supply chain management.
(Lead Instructor:  Hamid Noori, Waterloo)
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DM-891*  Management of Quality 
The many factors that effect quality in business, government and other organizations comprise the broad subject called Management of Quality.  The organizational function, Quality Management, has disappeared in many organizations today. However the activities of management of quality have been dispersed throughout and are of increasing importance because of the ever escalating demands for performance excellence and customer satisfaction. The course seeks to familiarize students with all aspects of the management of quality, and provide them with the knowledge they need to become designers of, and participants in, quality management systems and processes. Major topics covered in the course include: strategic quality planning, organizational structure for quality, quality in design and processes, statistical quality control techniques, teamwork and reward systems, and quality standards such as ISO9000, TS 16949, TL 9000, the national quality awards such as Baldrige, Canada’s Award for Excellence. (Lead Instructor:  Dennis Beecroft, Waterloo)
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UNENE (University Network of Excellence in Nuclear Engineering)
UN-806* Selected Topics in Engineering Physics

UNENE course number = EP806

The course covers power reactor fuel design/performance & safety aspects; complements Eng. Physics/UNENE courses on reactor core/safety design/hydraulics; includes fissile/fertile fuels/burnup effects/fuel production/quality assurance/CANDU fuel tech. specifications/thermal conductivity/fuel chemistry/restructuring/grain growth/fission product behaviour/defect detection/ performance in operation/channel behaviour in design basis & severe accidents. Instructor: Staff /tba.

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UN 860* Industrial Research Project, UWO

UNENE course number = UN 0600

If they so elect, candidates for the M. Eng. (Nuclear Engineering) Degree may spend approximately four months in an industrial laboratory carrying out an industry-oriented project under the supervision of a suitably qualified staff scientist. Usually there is also a university co-supervisor. The Department will attempt to arrange an industrial project in consultation with the candidate and through negotiation with the candidate’s employer. A satisfactory project topic and appropriate arrangements are required for the project to be approved by the Department and it is possible that in some cases this may not be feasible. Upon completion, the candidate will submit a substantial report on the project and make a presentation on it at the university. The industrial research project can only be undertaken after at least half the required courses have been taken. The industrial research project counts as two half courses. University of Western Ontario / Staff

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UN 861* Control, Instr. Elec. Systems

UNENE Course number = UN 0601

This course covers the basic control, instrumentation and electrical systems commonly found in CANDU based nuclear power plants. The course starts with an overall view of the dynamics associated with different parts of the plant, i.e. reactor, heat transport systems, moderator, steam generator, turbine, and electrical generator. Based on such knowledge, the control and regulation functions in the above systems are then defined. Different instrumentation and measurement techniques are examined, along with control strategies. The time and frequency domain performance characterizations of control loops are introduced with consideration of actuator and sensor limitations. Different controller design and tuning methods and instrumentation calibration procedures are discussed. Two modes of operation of CANDU plants will be analyzed, i.e. normal mode and alternate mode. Advanced control technologies, such as distributed control systems, Field bus communication protocols are introduced in view of their potential applications in the existing and newly constructed CANDU power plants. The electric systems in the CANDU plant will be examined. The modeling of the dynamics and control devices for the generator will be covered in details. The dynamic interaction between the CANDU power plants and the rest of the electric power grid with other generating facilities and various types of load will be studied. University of Western Ontario/J. Jiang.
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UN 862* Nuclear Fuel Waste Management

UNENE Course Number = UN 0602

Presently, nuclear fuel waste management involves storage in water pools or dry storage containers at reactor sites. If the fuel is then defined as waste, permanent disposal at an appropriate deep geological site would be considered. This course will describe the physical and chemical properties of the fuel and these approaches to storage and disposal. Key features of the fuel include its chemical and physical structure and properties prior to, and after, in-reactor irradiation, the nature and distribution of radionuclides produced in-reactor, and the chemical and physical properties of the Zircaloy fuel cladding before and after in-reactor exposure. The principles behind pool and dry storage will be described including the design of storage containers and the chemical and corrosion processes that could influence their long-term integrity. The possible permanent disposal scenarios developed internationally will be discussed, with a primary emphasis on those potentially applicable in Canada. For this last topic, the design and fabrication of waste containers and the processes that could potentially lead to their failure, the properties of engineered barriers within the geological site, the essential geological features of the chosen site, and the computational modeling approaches used in site performance assessment calculations will be described. University of Western Ontario/D. Shoesmith

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UN 863* Project Management for Nuclear Engineers

UNENE Course number = UN 0603

Project Management is emerging as perhaps the key core competency in engineering in the 21st century industrial workplace. This course in Project Management will prepare nuclear engineers in the application of this discipline in their work. It is an intensive investigation into the major principles of Project Management slanted towards, but not exclusively about, the management of nuclear engineering projects. The course uses the Project Management Institute’s PMBOK (Project Management Body of Knowledge) as a skeleton and expands that coverage with relevant examples from nuclear, software and general engineering. Special emphasis will be placed on Risk Management, particularly in the area of safety-critical projects. The graduate will be well-positioned both to apply the knowledge in their area of engineering and to sit the PMI’s PMP examination. The course will be taught by a professional engineer holding the PMP certification, using many case studies from industry and engineering. University of Western Ontario/M. Bennett

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UN 870* Industrial Research Project, U. of Waterloo

UNENE course number = UN 0700

If they so elect, candidates for the M. Eng. (Nuclear Engineering) Degree may spend approximately four months in an industrial laboratory carrying out an industry-oriented project under the supervision of a suitably qualified staff scientist. Usually there is also a university co-supervisor. The Department will attempt to arrange an industrial project in consultation with the candidate and through negotiation with the candidate’s employer. A satisfactory project topic and appropriate arrangements are required for the project to be approved by the Department and it is possible that in some cases this may not be feasible. Upon completion, the candidate will submit a substantial report on the project and make a presentation on it at the university. The industrial research project can only be undertaken after at least half the required courses have been taken. The industrial research project counts as two half courses. University of Waterloo/Staff.

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UN 871* Engineering Risk and Reliability

UNENE course number = UN 0701

This course presents a broad treatment of the subject of engineering decision, risk, and reliability. Emphasis is on (1) the modelling of engineering problems and evaluation of systems performance under conditions of uncertainty; (2) risk-based approach to life-cycle management of engineering systems; (3) systematic development of design criteria, explicitly taking into account the significance of uncertainty; and (4) logical framework for risk assessment and risk-benefit tradeoffs in decision making. The necessary mathematical concepts are developed in the context of engineering problems. The main topics of discussion are: probability theory, statistical data analysis, component and system reliability concepts, time-dependent reliability analysis, computational methods, life-cycle optimization models and risk management in public policy. University of Waterloo/M. Pandey

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UN 872* Power Plant Thermodynamics

UNENE course number = UN 0702

Theoretical and practical analysis of the following with particular reference to CANDU plants:
- STEAM POWER CYCLES: Thermodynamic Processes; Thermodynamic Laws; Superheating and Reheating; Regenerative Feedwater Heating; Moisture Separation and Reheating; Turbine Expansion Lines
- EXERGY AND HEAT TRANSFER: Available Energy Transfer; Exergy Flow Diagrams; Thermo-economic Analysis; Heat Conduction and Convection; Boiling and Condensing; Two Phase Flow
- NUCLEAR HEAT REMOVAL: Reactor Heat Generation; Heat Transfer in Boilers and Condensers; Boiler Influence on Heat Transport System; Boiler Swelling and Shrinking; Boiler Level Control; Boiler Operations.  University of Waterloo/ R. Chaplin
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UN 880* Industrial Research Project

UNENE course number = UN 0800

If they so elect, candidates for the M. Eng. (Nuclear Engineering) Degree may spend approximately four months in an industrial laboratory carrying out an industry-oriented project under the supervision of a suitably qualified staff scientist. Usually there is also a university co-supervisor. The Department will attempt to arrange an industrial project in consultation with the candidate and through negotiation with the candidate’s employer. A satisfactory project topic and appropriate arrangements are required for the project to be approved by the Department and it is possible that in some cases this may not be feasible. Upon completion, the candidate will submit a substantial report on the project and make a presentation on it at the university. The industrial research project can only be undertaken after at least half the required courses have been taken. The industrial research project counts as two half courses. McMaster University / Staff

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UN 881* Nuclear Plant Syst. Operations

UNENE course number = UN 0801

System and overall unit operations relevant to nuclear power plants with emphasis on CANDU; includes all major reactor and process systems with nuclear plant simulator; self-study using interactive CD ROM. Two to three class, one-day meetings will be scheduled. McMaster University/G. Bereznai

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UN 882* Reactor Physics

UNENE course number = UN 0802

An introduction to nuclear energy and fission energy systems is presented. The energetics of nuclear reactions, interactions of radiation with matter, radioactivity, design and operating principles of fission are presented. Nuclear reactor physics including chain reactions, reactor statics and kinetics, multigroup analysis, core thermalhydraulics and the impact of these topics on reactor design are covered. Special topics such as xenon dynamics, burnup and reactor flux effects on safety are included. McMaster University/E. Nichita

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UN 883* Nuclear Reactor Safety Design

UNENE course number = UN 0803

Technology and safety analysis underlying nuclear reactor safety. Topics include: Nature of the hazards; concepts of risk; probability tools and techniques; safety criteria; design basis accidents; case studies; safety analysis technology; human error; safety system design; and general safety design principles. McMaster University/V. Snell

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UN 884* Reactor Thermalhydraulics

UNENE course number = UN 0804

Fundamentals of single-phase and two-phase flow, and heat and mass transfer. Nuclear power plant primary heat transport system design and calculations, including design description and characteristics of main components and systems. Simulation methodology and tools, including development and qualification of selected thermal-hydraulics computer codes. Course also covers experimental techniques, facilities and results that describe important thermal-hydraulics phenomena. Course topics include: development of conservation equations and relevant constitutive correlations, flow patterns and boiling heat transport regimes, critical heat flux and pressure drop calculations, description of most important computer codes, description of relevant experimental facilities and results, safety margins and operational safety issues and methodologies. McMaster University/N. Popov

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UN 885* Radiation Health Risks and Benefits

UNENE course number = UN 0805

This course is designed to introduce graduate students to recent advances in radiation biology that have direct impact on our understanding of the health risks associated with ionizing radiation. The course will focus on radiation absorption in living tissue and physical and biological processes that influence the consequences of the exposure. Students will learn about the biological effects from different radiation qualities, doses, and dose rates. The course will address cellular radiation damage and repair mechanisms and introduce students to modern techniques in molecular biology used in accident and emergency biological dosimetry. The material will relate to radiation applications in medicine and industry. No prior knowledge of biology at an advanced level is required.  McMaster University/D. Tucker

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UN 890* Industrial Research Project, Queen's U.

UNENE course number = UN 0900

If they so elect, candidates for the M. Eng. (Nuclear Engineering) Degree may spend approximately four months in an industrial laboratory carrying out an industry-oriented project under the supervision of a suitably qualified staff scientist. Usually there is also a university co-supervisor. The Department will attempt to arrange an industrial project in consultation with the candidate and through negotiation with the candidate’s employer. A satisfactory project topic and appropriate arrangements are required for the project to be approved by the Department and it is possible that in some cases this may not be feasible. Upon completion, the candidate will submit a substantial report on the project and make a presentation on it at the university. The industrial research project can only be undertaken after at least half the required courses have been taken. The industrial research project counts as two half courses. Queen’s University.

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UN 891* Nuclear Materials

UNENE course number = UN 0901

A nuclear reactor presents a unique environment in which materials must perform. In addition to the high temperatures and stresses to which materials are subjected in conventional applications, nuclear materials are subjected to various kinds of radiation which affect their performance, and often this dictates a requirement for a unique property (for example, a low cross section for thermal neutron absorption) that is not relevant in conventional applications. The effects of the radiation may be direct (e.g., the displacement of atoms from their normal positions by fast neutrons or fission fragments), or indirect (e.g., a more aggressive chemical environment caused by radiolytic decomposition). This course describes materials typically used in nuclear environments, the unique conditions to which they are subjected, the basic physical phenomena that affect their performance and the resulting design criteria for reactor components made from these materials. Queen’s University/R. Holt

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UN 892* Fuel Management

UNENE course number = UN 0902

Nuclear fuel cycles are studied from mining to ultimate disposal of the spent fuel, including the enrichment processes and the reprocessing techniques, from a point of view of the decision-making processes and the evaluation of the operational and economical consequences of these decisions. For the steps within the fuel cycles, the method of determining the associated costs, in particular those relevant to the disposal of nuclear waste, and the overall fuel cycle costs are described. Burn-up calculations are performed for the swelling time of the fuel within the reactor core. The objectives and merits of in-core and out-of-core fuel management for CANDU Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWR) and Light Water Reactors (LWR) are analyzed in detail, for the refueling equilibrium as well as for the approach to refueling equilibrium. The course also covers fuel management for thorium-fuelled CANDU reactors and other advanced fuels such as MOX containing plutonium from discarded nuclear warheads, and DUPIC (Direct Use of PWR fuel in CANDU reactors). The fuel management problem is treated as an optimization problem, with objective functions or performance indexes identified, as well as decision variables and appropriate constraints (active and non-active). The course also includes a review of the major work done in this area along with the most important computer codes. Queen’s University/ H. Bonin

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UN 893* Industrial Research Project, U. of Toronto

UNENE course number = UN 1000

If they so elect, candidates for the M. Eng. (Nuclear Engineering) Degree may spend approximately four months in an industrial laboratory carrying out an industry-oriented project under the supervision of a suitably qualified staff scientist. Usually there is also a university co-supervisor. The Department will attempt to arrange an industrial project in consultation with the candidate and through negotiation with the candidate’s employer. A satisfactory project topic and appropriate arrangements are required for the project to be approved by the Department and it is possible that in some cases this may not be feasible. Upon completion, the candidate will submit a substantial report on the project and make a presentation on it at the university. The industrial research project can only be undertaken after at least half the required courses have been taken. The industrial research project counts as two half courses. University of Toronto
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UN 894* Reactor Chemistry & Corrosion

UNENE course number = UN 1001

Corrosion and its costs, corrosion measurement, general materials and environment affects. Types of corrosion: uniform, galvanic, crevice, pitting, intergranular, selective leaching, erosion-corrosion, stress-corrosion, hydrogen effects. Corrosion testing: materials selection. Electrochemical principles: thermodynamics, electrode kinetics, mixed potentials, practical applications. High temperature corrosion. Nuclear plant corrosion, fossil plant corrosion, other industrial environments. University of Toronto/D. Lister

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Graduate Studies Courses of Instruction Mechanical and Materials Engineering
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