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Graduate Studies Programs of Study Mining Engineering


Mining Engineering
Head
Katsabanis, P.D.
 
Coordinator of Graduate Studies
Archibald, J.F.
 
Professor
Archibald, J.F.Daneshmend, L.K.2, Hodge, R.A.3, Kelebek, S., McKinnon, S.D.,1 Pickles, C.A.
 
Associate Professor
De Souza, E.M., Katsabanis, P.D.
 
Assistant Professor
Ghahremaniezhad, A., Marshall, J.
 
Adjuncts
Davis, B., Doggett, M., McIsaac, G., Peacey, J., Peck, J.P., Samson, C.  
 
 

1  Chair in Mine Design  

2  Noranda-Falconbridge Chair in Mine-Mechanical Engineering
3  Stollery Professor in Mining Engineering and Geological Sciences and Geological Engineering


About the Program From its inauguration in 1893, Mining at Queen’s has held a significant position in the Canadian mineral industry. Graduates are involved in all facets of the industry and can be found at major mining operations throughout the world. Our engineers work in base metals, gold, iron ore, industrial minerals, coal, uranium, oil, with consulting companies, geotechnical groups, environmental groups, heavy and light equipment manufacturing companies, computer software and hardware development organizations, banks, government institutions and university organizations. The Department works in close contact with the minerals industry.

Mining has close relationships with Mechanical and Geological Engineering through cross appointments of the Chair in Mine Mechanical Engineering and the Stollery Professorship in Mining and Geology. The Kinross Professorship in Mining and also provides exposure to the additional key area of occupational health and safety. Graduate students benefit from courses in these departments, as well as courses in Civil and Chemical Engineering and Geography.

The Department offers the degrees of Master of Applied Science (M.A.Sc.), Master of Engineering (M.Eng.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) with specializations in Mining Engineering and Mineral Extraction.

Departmental Facilities

The Robert M. Buchan Department of Mining is located in Goodwin Hall which provides lecture, laboratory and study facilities. The on-campus laboratories include a Rock Mechanics laboratory, Mine Environment laboratory, Computer Planning facilities, and several Mineral Processing laboratories. The department also operates an Explosive Test Site in Hinchinbrooke Township, near Kingston. Laboratories are fully equipped for the programs offered. In addition, they include extensive equipment for advanced study and research in the various fields of major interest. The facilities allow undergraduate courses to be conducted in close proximity to graduate study and research. As a result, sound professional practice can be emphasized while the potential for future development is demonstrated.

Research Areas

Rock Mechanics: J.F. Archibald, S. McKinnon, E. DeSouza

Blasting, Explosives, Impact Dynamics: P.K. Katsabanis

Reliability and Maintenance: L. Daneshmend

Mining Systems, Robotics and Automation: J. Marshall, L. Daneshmend

Ventilation: E. DeSouza

Scheduling, Planning, Design: S. McKinnon

Hydrometallurgical Processing: S. Kelebek, B. Davis, A. Ghahremaninezhad (biohyrdometallurgy) 

Pyrometallurgy: C. Pickles

Environmental and Sustainability: R.A. Hodge, S. Kelebek, B. Davis

Programs of Study Applicants are accepted under the general regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applications to the M.Eng., M.A.Sc. and Ph.D. programs from other related engineering and science programs are encouraged.  These would include, Mechanical Engineering, Geological Engineering, Civil Engineering and Physics programs for mining projects and Metallurgical Engineering, Chemical Engineering and Chemistry programs for mineral processing projects.
MASTERS DEGREES
Master of Engineering (M.Eng.) The requirement for completion of the M.Eng. degree is eight (8) term length courses. Two of the courses can be at the 400 undergraduate level. Students are eligible to take any relevant courses listed in the Graduate Calendar, as long as at least four (4) of the courses are taken from their home department.  Students generally take a set of courses that fit their background and interest. 
 
In Mining Engineering, students have the option to take MINE-898*, a project-based courses that counts as one course towards the required eight courses total.

All students must take CHEM-801*, a non-credit course in laboratory safety, at the first opportunity after their initial registration. Students who have previously completed MINE-462 or MINE-862 as part of their regular undergraduate or graduate programs at Queen's University, are exempt from this requirement.

Master of Applied Science (M.A.Sc.) The minimum requirements for the M.A.Sc. are four (4)term length courses, satisfactory participation in the graduate seminar (MINE-897) and completion of a research thesis (MINE-899). Normally, two courses will be taken within and two courses will be taken outside the Mining Department. The department may make exceptions to this academic requirement if a different balance of mining and external courses is beneficial to the student and has the support of the supervisor. One term length course can be from the 400-series in another department, or, under exceptional circumstances, from Mining, but this course must be selected according to applicable regulations.

All students must take CHEM-801*, a non-credit course in laboratory safety, at the first opportunity after their initial registration. Students who have previously completed MINE-462 or MINE-862 as part of their regular undergraduate or graduate programs at Queen's University, are exempt from this requirement.

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

The minimum academic requirements are four term length courses beyond the M.A.Sc. degree, satisfactory participation in the graduate seminar MINE-897, successful completion of the comprehensive examination requirement, and completion of a research thesis (MINE-999). All courses must be taken at the graduate level. Normally, three courses will be taken within and one course will be taken outside the Mining Department. The department may make exceptions to this academic requirement if a different balance of mining and external courses is beneficial to the student and has the support of the supervisor. In certain cases, the number of courses required will be larger than the minimum. The selected academic program must be approved by the Department.

All students must take CHEM-801*, a non-credit course in laboratory safety, at the first opportunity after their initial registration. Students who have previously completed MINE-462 or MINE-862 as part of their regular undergraduate or graduate programs at Queen's University, are exempt from this requirement.

The comprehensive examination, an assessment of the student's understanding of the major areas of Mining Engineering, must be taken by all Ph.D. candidates and may, under special entrance requirements, be required to be taken in two parts.

Should an entering Ph.D. student's background in mining engineering or related disciplines be deemed to be insufficient, a designated program of study and/or completion of general knowledge examinations (first level comprehensive examination) will be required to be taken. The first level comprehensive examination will review the candidate's general background in Mining Engineering and must be held in the fall term of the second year of the Ph.D. program.

If a first level knowledge examination is not required, the Ph.D. student will be required to complete a comprehensive examination leading up to a final thesis defense that will cover the area of specialization and areas of the candidate's background preparation. This examination should be taken at least 18 months after a student's initial registration in the Ph.D. program and no later than 12 months prior to the final thesis defense.

Funding

A minimum funding guarantee for eligible students at the Master’s level of $16,800 and at the Ph.D. level of $18,000 per year is available. M.Eng students are self-funded.

Teaching Assistantships may be offered to stu­dents throughout the academic year.

Registered full-time students who are in good academic standing with Queen’s are eligible for a wide range of internal and external scholarship and bursary awards.

Financial Assistance The Robert M. Buchan Department of Mining offers support for each full-time student during the first two years in a Master of Applied Science program and the first four years in a Doctoral program.
Graduate Certificate in Community Relations for the Extractive Industries Note: Admission to the Graduate Certificate program in Community Relations for the Extractive Industries (GCCR) is temporarily suspended.

The Graduate Certificate program in Community Relations for the Extractive Industries (GCCR) is the first of its kind in North America. Adapted to reflect industry needs, community challenges and the political realities of North America, the certificate program at Queen’s is based on the structure and design of the successful University of Queensland program in Australia.

Program Details

The program is comprised of two components - an intensive short term (week) residential experience (to be held in August), and the longer term distance learning component (on-line, self-directed but externally facilitated).

The program can be completed on a part-time basis over one or two years.

The Certificate consists of 4 core courses, listed here: GCCR courses.

Admission

Admission requirements for students entering the certificate program will include: 

  • A baccalaureate degree from a recognized university;
  • B- graduating average or higher (70% graduating average or a ranking in the top third of the graduating class where number grades are not available);
  • Under exceptional circumstances, consideration will be given to highly motivated individuals with relevant field experience who do not meet the B- requirement; and 
  • A statement of interest in the program will be required in order to ensure alignment of the applicant’s academic background, work experience, and career aspirations with the objectives of the program.

Although an Engineering degree is not required, relevant work experience in the area of Mining or other Extractive industries is essential.

    For more information, contact the Program Coordinator to indicate interest.

     

    Graduate Studies Programs of Study Mining Engineering
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