Queen's University - Accessibility Guide - 21 Security
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21 Security   PDF version

Security systems can inadvertently create obstacles to the independent movement of persons with disabilities. Some systems require manual dexterity, others use auditory commands and yet others use only visual communication. Security systems should provide information in a variety of formats to ensure that they can be used by people with visual, auditory and mobility disabilities.

21.1 Locks

This section is important for people with mobility impairments  This section is important for people with visual impairments  This section is important for people with learning impairments  Locks and key controlled locations should

a) be mounted at a maximum height of 1200 mm;
b) be colour contrasted;
c) not require tight gripping, turning or that two manoeuvres be completed at the same time (such as pushing down a lever and pulling a door open).

Push-button type systems or contactless remote systems are the preferred method of security control as they accommodate the needs of many people with disabilities.

21.2 Building Control Systems

This section is important for people with hearing impairments  This section is important for people with visual impairments  Security systems that control access to buildings should:

a) be mounted at a maximum height of 1200 mm;
b) be colour contrasted;
c) provide information in both an auditory and visual format;
d) not require tight gripping, grasping or turning; and
e) be integrated into the automatic door opener system where possible.

Intercom systems should comply with Section 12 Communication.

21.3 Security Desks

Security staff should be

a) available at accessible desks or counters; and
b) trained to provide appropriate services to persons with a wide range of
disabilities (i.e. sign language, communication, attendant care, etc.).


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