Urban Forest Plan



Duncan McArthur Hall: Interior Courtyard
125. Duncan McArthur Hall: Interior Courtyard


Duncan McArthur Hall: Exterior Courtyard
126. Duncan McArthur Hall: Exterior Courtyard


Duncan McArthur and Jean Royce Halls: Existing Condition
127. Duncan McArthur and Jean Royce Halls: Existing Condition


Duncan McArthur and Jean Royce Halls: Improvement Concept
128. Duncan McArthur and Jean Royce Halls: Improvement Concept


24   WEST CAMPUS: McARTHUR AND JEAN ROYCE HALLS

Duncan McArthur and Jean Royce Halls require a planting design overhaul to create a more complete and unified landscape in keeping with the campus image.

Priority rating: 2

This landscape dates back to the 1970's. Although presently in very poor condition, the remnant of its original structure still represents a good example of landscape architecture for that period. Overall, the planting appears incomplete and inappropriately altered, creating a disjointed impression. Tree species are varied, from ornamental to naturalized species, including Honeylocust, Ash, Norway Maple, Pyramidal Oak, Cherry, Linden, Mountain Ash, Spruce and Scot's Pine. Several interior courtyards with very poor plantings appear unused. There are no significant street tree plantings. The Cherry and Ash trees at the entrance are storm damaged, diseased and in declining health. The exterior courtyard between the two wings of Duncan McArthur Hall is in good condition. The front terrace with former pools and fountains is in fair condition.

New plantings for Duncan McArthur and Jean Royce Halls should follow the theme of "less is more". A new entrance planting is recommended. The Cherry trees should be removed and replaced with a more typical street tree planting as on the main campus. Ornamental plantings should be maintained to reinforce the architectural style of the building. Plantings should be in rows or bosques for a formal appearance. The exterior courtyards should have excess trees removed to allow select trees room to develop. The remaining interior courtyards should have plantings removed completely and paved. These areas should not be planted unless proper user and maintenance access is provided.

The west campus appears to require high maintenance which could be reduced by organizing tree plantings in beds wherever possible, either a mulch bed or underplantings of shrubs and groundcover. The maintenance requirements for the interior courtyards are very high and these spaces may be considered for sculpture installations or specifically designed xeriscapes.

Species recommendation

Street tree
   Acer saccharum, Sugar Maple and cultivars
   Fraxinus americana, White Ash
   Ginkgo biloba, Maidenhair Tree
   Quercus rubra, Red Oak
   Tilia sp., Linden
   Ulmus 'Pioneer', Pioneer Elm

Ornamental tree
   Betula papyrifera, Paper Birch
   Carpinus betulus 'Fastigiata', Pyramidal Hornbeam
   Cercis canadensis, Redbud
   Fagus sp., Beech cultivars
   Malus sp., Flowering Crabapples
   Quercus robur, English Oak
   Abies concolor, Silver Fir
   Metasequoia glyptostroboides, Dawn Redwood
   Picea sp., Spruce species (Norway, Colorado)
   Pinus strobus, White Pine