Urban Forest Plan



Arch, Deacon and Barrie Streets: Existing Condition
31. Arch, Deacon and Barrie Streets: Existing Condition


 Arch, Deacon and Barrie Streets: Improvement Concept
32. Arch, Deacon and Barrie Streets: Improvement Concept


4   ARCH, DEACON AND BARRIE STREETS

These fairly quiet streets at the eastern edge of campus serve as linear open spaces and movement routes. Barrie Street is also the interface with the community and Deacon Street is a secondary gateway and pedestrian link between City Park and Summerhill Park. The streetscape should be upgraded with consistent street tree planting and appropriate pedestrian paving.

Priority rating: 3

Barrie Street clearly defines the eastern edge of the campus. Many of its Silver Maple street trees were damaged in the recent ice storm. New plantings of Honeylocust in front of Earl Hall were also badly damaged. Many of the plantings in the front yards of the residences are overgrown and in poor condition.

Deacon Street is scheduled for reconstruction in early 1999 to form a pedestrian link between the campus, Barrie Street and City Park beyond. The recently completed Biosciences Complex has introduced new plantings of Honeylocust to the Arch Street character. The two large Silver Maples at the corners of Earl Hall are showing signs of stress and are in declining health. Across the street along Humphrey Hall, plantings of Hackberry are doing well.

All three streets should be reinforced with an informal street tree planting program. The informality allows for a more irregular planting rhythm to accommodate driveways and building entrances while providing an overall sense of order. Tree species for narrower spaces such as Arch and Deacon Streets should be medium sized, light textured trees. Trees for Barrie Street should be larger species to balance with the open and large scale character of City Park.

All existing Silver Maple, Birch and Sycamore trees should be monitored for declining health and potential structural problems. A program of pruning, cabling and fertilizing should be implemented. The Honeylocusts along Barrie Street in front of Earl Hall are badly damaged and should be removed. These trees could be removed now while they are fairly small, or a second row could be planted behind them to prepare for their removal at a later date.

Species recommendation

Street tree: Barrie
   Acer sp., Maple species (Red, Autumn Blaze)
   Quercus rubra, Red Oak
   Ulmus 'Pioneer', Pioneer Elm

Street tree: Deacon, Arch
   Celtis occidentalis, Hackberry
   Gleditsia triacanthos sp., Honeylocust
   Tilia sp., Basswood