Department of Classics

Queen's University
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Annual Classics Symposium
31 March 2017

  • Etruscan Dance Culture, Tomb Paintings, Tarquinia, Classics research, Queen's

    Undergraduate student Anthea Morgan presents her research on Etruscan Dance Culture as Represented in Tomb Paintings from the UNESCO Heritage Site in Tarquinia (Italy)

  • Etruscan Dance Culture, Tomb Paintings, Tarquinia, Classics research, Queen's

    Undergraduate student Anthea Morgan presents her research on Etruscan Dance Culture as Represented in Tomb Paintings from the UNESCO Heritage Site in Tarquinia (Italy)

  • Photogrammetric Stereoplotting, Theodosian Palace, Stobi, Republic of Macedonia

    Undergraduate student Kavita Mistry presents her research on Photogrammetric Stereoplotting of the Theodosian Palace at the Ancient Site of Stobi, Republic of Macedonia: Reviving a 20th Century Technique for the 21st Century

  • Photogrammetric Stereoplotting, Theodosian Palace, Stobi, Republic of Macedonia

    Undergraduate student Kavita Mistry presents her research on Photogrammetric Stereoplotting of the Theodosian Palace at the Ancient Site of Stobi, Republic of Macedonia: Reviving a 20th Century Technique for the 21st Century

  • Undergraduate student Alysha Strongman presents her research on The Diniacopoulos Coin Collection at Queen’s

    Undergraduate student Alysha Strongman presents her research on The Diniacopoulos Coin Collection at Queen’s

  • Undergraduate student Alysha Strongman's research poster on The Diniacopoulos Coin Collection at Queen’s

    Undergraduate student Alysha Strongman's research poster on The Diniacopoulos Coin Collection at Queen’s

  • Undergraduate student Anthea Morgan presents her research poster entitled Why has Classical Drama been Foundational for 172 Years at Queen’s University?

    Undergraduate student Anthea Morgan presents her research poster entitled Why has Classical Drama been Foundational for 172 Years at Queen’s University?

  • Undergraduate student Anthea Morgan's research poster entitled Why has Classical Drama been Foundational for 172 Years at Queen’s University?

    Undergraduate student Anthea Morgan's research poster entitled Why has Classical Drama been Foundational for 172 Years at Queen’s University?

  • Graduate student Brandon Francis presents his research:  The Peloponnesian Fleet: Disputing Thucydides’ Land versus Sea Dichotomy

    Graduate student Brandon Francis presents his research:  The Peloponnesian Fleet: Disputing Thucydides’ Land versus Sea Dichotomy

  • Graduate student Brandon Francis presents his research:  The Peloponnesian Fleet: Disputing Thucydides’ Land versus Sea Dichotomy

    Graduate student Brandon Francis presents his research:  The Peloponnesian Fleet: Disputing Thucydides’ Land versus Sea Dichotomy

  • Graduate student Nik Gill presents his research: Babylonian Birth Omens in Classical Literature

    Graduate student Nik Gill presents his research: Babylonian Birth Omens in Classical Literature

  • Graduate student Nik Gill presents his research: Babylonian Birth Omens in Classical Literature

    Graduate student Nik Gill presents his research: Babylonian Birth Omens in Classical Literature

  • Graduate student Alexander Harmantas presents his research: Literary and Archaeological Evidence for Ancient Macedonian Speech

    Graduate student Alexander Harmantas presents his research: Literary and Archaeological Evidence for Ancient Macedonian Speech

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Inquiry@Queen's
9-10 March 2017

Classics had four of its students involved in the annual Inquiry@Queen's Undergraduate Research Conference:
two of our students did presentations, with the other two presenting their research in poster format (see photos below).

 

​Anthea Morgan explored the question of "Why has Classical Drama been Foundational for 172 Years at Queen’s University?". This was the result of a directed research project on the history of classical drama at Queen's. While delving into course calendars, book lists, and newspaper articles in Queen's Archives, Anthea uncovered a wealth of data related to the history of our department and our professors' and students' involvement in the teaching and performance of Greek and Roman drama stretching back to the 1840s. In this poster she suggested why classical drama has always been so important at Queen's.

Anthea is seen here with her proud supervisorBarbara Reeves.

 

 

 

 

Alysha Strongman's research focused on cataloguing and identifying coins in "The Diniacopoulos Coin Collection at Queen’s". This is a collection of Greek and Roman coins acquired by the Classics Department and Art Conservation in 2001 for research purposes.

Alysha is seen here with her proud supervisor, Cristiana Zaccagnino.

 
(photos and text provided by Barbara Reeves)