Queen’s Model Parliament: A learning opportunity like no other

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someone

The following is a guest blog written by Queen’s Model Parliament co-chairs Jasmine Lagundzija, (Artsci’18) and Brandon Jamieson, (Artsci’17).

For three days every January, 350 students from Queen’s University travel to Ottawa to participate in the country’s largest and oldest model Parliament conference. For the past 70 years, Queen’s Model Parliament (QMP) has given young Canadians the opportunity to engage with politics firsthand as they hone their debating skills and draft legislation to address some of the nation’s most pressing issues, all while seated in the House of Commons.

The conference begins in September, when more than 500 students from nearly every discipline apply for the opportunity to attend QMP. Then, through random lottery, 338 students have the opportunity to attend the conference as delegates. When they are admitted to the conference, they are bound to one of the five major political parties in Canada. Continue Reading »

A look back on 2016

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someone

It has been a wonderful year at Queen’s University – one full of exciting announcements, unique challenges, and major milestones. As we head into the holidays, I’ve been looking back on some of my favourite moments of the past twelve months, and wanted to share a few of them with you.

January

The year started off with the announcement of a $4-million grant from the NSERC Discovery Frontiers Program for the Engineered Nickel Catalysts for Electrochemical Clean Energy (Ni Electro Can) research team, to develop the next generation of clean energy technologies. With 14 Canadian researchers, seven universities, nine international researchers from seven different countries, and a number of industry partners on board, the Ni Electro Can team is a perfect example of how collaboration enables researchers to remain at the forefront of discovery and propel Canadian research onto the world stage. Continue Reading »

On racism, diversity, and inclusion at Queen’s: Some thoughts and a proposed course of action

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someone

This has been a difficult week for many Queen’s community members. Periodically, our relatively quiet campus explodes in controversy. I’ve seen it happen a handful of times since I’ve been principal, each situation unique in its own right, but each almost invariably magnified by the potent influence of social media.

Last week, reports emerged of a costume party attended by Queen’s students that involved the unacceptable misappropriation and stereotyping of numerous cultures. This has understandably caused both anxiety and anger for many; it has also rekindled an important conversation in our community about the degree to which Queen’s is a welcoming and inclusive community.

While we are much more diverse than we once were, this incident has acted as an urgent reminder that Queen’s still has much work to do on these issues, and in particular on sensitizing all our community members to actions and behaviours that may seem harmless fun to many but which marginalize some members and make them feel unwelcome at our university. Continue Reading »

Peace: the absence of fear and the presence of justice

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someone

The following is a guest post from Queen’s University’s Inter-faith Chaplain, Kate Johnson, who delivered this speech on November 11th at a Peacequest event called “The World Remembers.” 

In my early teens I made my first faulty commitment to pacifism. At 28, I met the soldier who would eventually become my husband. He had learned of my claim to pacifism previously but was still interested in meeting me. Had I known he was a soldier I would not likely have seen the date through. Immediately, I was forced to admire his open mind and willingness to challenge his own prejudices – although one of his first questions felt more like a challenge to me.

He asked how a person of conscience could be willing to “do nothing” when the world was crying out for justice. I was confused – Continue Reading »

Finding ways to thrive at Queen’s

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someone

I am grateful every day for the opportunity to serve the Queen’s community as its 20th Principal and Vice-Chancellor. It is a privilege to work alongside some of the most talented and intelligent individuals I’ve ever met, and I am incredibly proud of the students we attract, teach, and graduate. And yet, as wonderful as this position is to hold, there are elements of my work life that are inherently stressful.

I would confidently assume that my counterparts at other post-secondary institutions similarly manage conflicting deadlines and extended work hours while making quality time for family. There is also that underlying feeling – a similar one to when you become a parent – of discomfort that when things are going well, the other shoe might be about to drop. I don’t even believe these stressors are unique to this type of position; Continue Reading »