A look back on 2016

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It has been a wonderful year at Queen’s University – one full of exciting announcements, unique challenges, and major milestones. As we head into the holidays, I’ve been looking back on some of my favourite moments of the past twelve months, and wanted to share a few of them with you.

January

The year started off with the announcement of a $4-million grant from the NSERC Discovery Frontiers Program for the Engineered Nickel Catalysts for Electrochemical Clean Energy (Ni Electro Can) research team, to develop the next generation of clean energy technologies. With 14 Canadian researchers, seven universities, nine international researchers from seven different countries, and a number of industry partners on board, the Ni Electro Can team is a perfect example of how collaboration enables researchers to remain at the forefront of discovery and propel Canadian research onto the world stage. Five of those 14 Canadian researchers are faculty members at Queen’s, including the team’s primary investigator, Dr. Gregory Jerkiewicz. The Honourable Dr. Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science, Mr. Mark Gerretsen, Member of Parliament for Kingston and the Islands, and Dr. Mario Pinto, President of Natural Science and Engineering Research Council of Canada, all came to Queen’s University to celebrate the announcement.

Photo by Lars Hagberg


February

During a visit to the University of Otago in New Zealand in early February, I renewed a memorandum of understanding between the seven universities in the Matariki Network of Universities. I was also fortunate to meet with some fellow Queen’s alumni at a Matariki reception in Auckland.

Auckland Alumni with DW


March

It was an honour to celebrate the recognition of Nobel Laureate Dr. Art McDonald and his SNOLAB collaborators in the House of Commons in early March. The Nobel Prize is a result of the dedication of 273 collaborative scientists whose work was generously funded by numerous universities, industry, and government organizations, including the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, the National Research Council of Canada, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, and Industry Canada. Their discovery, which has fundamentally changed our view of the universe, would not have been possible without continued support from the Government of Canada.

Photo courtesy of the Prime Minister’s Office


April

In April, we unveiled Alfred and Isabel Bader’s historic donation to our arts centre – Rembrandt’s Portrait of a Man with Arms Akimbo. As one of the most significant contributions of art to a Canadian university in history, the painting dramatically elevates The Bader Collection and places the Agnes among the premier university art galleries in North America for the study of European art. The gift also raises the international profile of the historical European collection and of the Agnes as a whole, as our arts centre now holds three of the six Rembrandts in Canadian public collections. Alfred Bader (Sc’45, Arts’46, MSc’47, LLD’86) and Isabel Bader (LLD’07) are among Queen’s most generous benefactors, supporting the university for seven decades. They have given back to Queen’s in countless ways: transforming the campus, enriching the student experience, supporting scholarship, and helping to enhance the university’s reputation as a top-tier educational institution.

Photo by Garrett Elliott


May

The month of May was filled with convocation ceremonies, and in honour of Queen’s University’s 175th anniversary, we decided to celebrate the accomplishments of some of our most distinguished alumni in conferring honorary degrees. Four members of our city’s most beloved band, The Tragically Hip, joined us for our second of 21 convocation ceremonies on May 2. Dr. Gord Sinclair delivered a wonderful speech to the crowd, “Your greatest satisfaction, in every aspect of your life, will come from the interactions with the people you partner with and those to whom you provide help.”

Photo by Bernard Clark


June

The Annual Staff and Faculty Barbecue gives us a chance to step away from our offices and connect with colleagues from across campus. Seeing so many faces at the event in early June was a perfect reminder of just how many people work day in and day out to make Queen’s a great university.

JUNE _ BC

Photo by Bernard Clark


July

In July, I spent a few hours visiting with the researchers and staff at the Canadian Cancer Trials Group. I followed my visit with a tour of Dr. Madhuri Koti’s oncology lab in the Queen’s Cancer Research Institute – one of several lab tours I completed over the year. I have really enjoyed meeting researchers in person and seeing the tremendous work they are doing, and I’ve found the tours to be very helpful to me in advancing Queen’s reputation and profile for research with government, alumni, and donors.

Photo by Greg Black


August

Just before Orientation Week, our AMS executives hosted a Roundtable on Volunteering in the Community. I joined our new Provost, Dr. Benoit-Antoine Bacon, Carolyn Thompson, AMS VP of University Affairs, and Mayor Bryan Paterson on stage. We discussed how students could become better involved in the community and leverage those experiences later in life. In honour of Queen’s 175th anniversary, the AMS also announced that they were aiming for 175 years worth of volunteer service from Queen’s students over the 2016-17 year!

AMS Panel 1


September

Under clear skies and dazzling sunshine, 3,373 people turned out to Nixon Field on Sept. 6 to help Queen’s University set the Guinness World Record for largest human letter – a Q. All of the participants wore gold T-shirts provided by the organizers. The Q had a circumference of approximately 140 metres, with organizers mapping out the letter in advance using more than 300 metres of rope. The record attempt is a highlight of the university’s 175th anniversary celebrations. Hundreds of incoming students helped fill up a large portion of the Q along with other students, faculty, staff, and local community members.

Photo by Garrett Elliot


October

Queen’s University was incorporated by an Imperial Royal Charter issued by Queen Victoria on Oct. 16, 1841. The university marked the 175th anniversary of that historic occasion with a tree dedication in the Snodgrass Arboretum in front of Summerhill on Sunday, Oct. 16. Earlier in the day, University Historian Duncan McDowall and I visited St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church, where we attended a special service that recognized the important role that church played in Queen’s early history. In this photo, I’m joined by Queen’s Elder in Residence, Mary Ann Spencer.

OCT


November

On Nov. 23, Mr. Seymour Schulich and I unveiled the Schulich-Woolf Rare Book Collection at Queen’s University, during a ceremony at the Queen’s Douglas Library. The collection, a combined 400 books, focuses on 16th-18th-century English history and culture but also includes volumes on travel, antiquities, and Canadiana. A titan of Canadian industry whose career spanned the financial services and mining sectors, Mr. Schulich has distinguished himself as a philanthropist over the last two decades, donating more than $350 million to universities and hospitals throughout Canada, the U.S., and Israel. In 2011, he launched the Schulich Leader Scholarships, a $100-million program that provides full scholarships to promising high school graduates with a passion for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Since the program’s inception, Queen’s has been a top-five destination for Schulich Leaders; fourteen of them have chosen to study at Queen’s. In this photo, Mr. Schulich (centre) and I look at one of the new displays with Alvan Bregman, Head, W.D. Jordan Rare Books and Special Collections.

NOV


December

Earlier this month, I hosted the annual Principal’s Holiday Reception where I honoured seven Queen’s staff members with Staff Recognition Awards. The awards recognize staff members who consistently provide outstanding contributions to the learning and working environment at Queen’s at a level significantly beyond what is usually expected. The 2016 Staff Recognition Award recipients are: Melinda Knox and Kelly Blair-Matuk, Office of the Vice-Principal (Research); Sandra McFadden, Office of the University Registrar (Student Awards); Sandra Murray, Centre for Teaching & Learning; Ben Seewald, Advancement – Alumni Relations; Deborah Smith, Office of the University Registrar (Exams Office); and Angela Street, Office of the University Registrar (Student Awards).

DEC

Of course, these are only twelve of a few hundred busy days around Queen’s University campus, but they are great reminders of what we’ve accomplished since January. I give my best wishes to you for a wonderful holiday break filled with friends, family and lots of rest and relaxation. See you all again in 2017!

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