Centre for Teaching and Learning

Centre for Teaching and Learning
Centre for Teaching and Learning

Queen's new Quality Assurance Processes (QUQAPs)

Cyclical Program Reviews are essential to ensuring quality in all academic programs, scholarship and research. Cyclical Program Reviews provide an opportunity for academic programs to articulate or update their degree level expectations (DLEs) and discipline-specific learning outcomes.

Preparing for Cyclical Program Review (Word, 163KB)

Preparing for Cyclical Program Reviews

Facilitated by Klodiana Kolomitro, Centre for Teaching and Learning
Tuesday, October 13, 2015, 2:00pm - 4:00pm and Thursday, October 15, 2015, 10:00am - 12:00pm

*Please note: this session is by invitation only. If you are interested in taking this, please contact Klodiana Kolomitro at kk78@queensu.ca.*

This session is offered to department heads and their teams in preparation for cyclical program review. We will provide participants with curriculum review strategies and resources they can use as they conduct the self-study component of their program review. By the end of the day participants will be able to:

  • Develop/validate program learning outcomes
  • Identify strategies for mapping program components and aligning the curriculum
  • Identify strategies for collecting evidence and leading a departmental retreat as part of the review process
  • Develop a long-term assessment plan 
  • Promote a learner/ing-focused approach to program review  

Degree Level Expectations (DLEs)

Overview and Background

To provide a framework reflecting expectations for university graduates, Degree Level Expectations (DLEs) were developed by the Ontario Council of Academic Vice-Presidents, subsequently endorsed by the Council of Ontario Universities for Baccalaureate/Bachelors graduates from Ontario's publicly assisted universities. The DLE's are designed to be integrated into the Queen's University Quality Assurance Process (QUQAP) with the concepts and the tools applicable to the entire Queen's community.

Advantages

At the program level:

  • Explicitly articulates the outcomes of a degree program relevant for graduate study preparation and professional qualifications
  • Provides a metric for evaluation and monitoring
  • Provides an overall framework that guides curriculum design and review
  • Identifies the continuity of skills and knowledge with respect to depth, breadth, and the sequence of learning

For faculty members:

  • Helps faculty members in designing courses that align with overall program goals
  • Situates learning in terms of the ecology of the program
  • Aids in developing appropriate assessment and evaluation of student learning

For students:

  • Informs students of the expectations and standards of the program
  • Identifies the learning outcomes for their studies
  • Provides concrete evidence of the quality of a program and the transferability of its degree
  • Facilitates credit transfers

Undergraduate Degree Level Expectations

DLEs Explained – The Six Expectations

There are six  Degree Level Expectations. They are:

  1. Depth and Breadth of Knowledge
  2. Knowledge of Methodologies
  3. Application of Knowledge
  4. Communication Skills
  5. Awareness of Limits of Knowledge
  6. Autonomy and Professional Capacity

Expectations for a Bachelor's Degree versus a Bachelor's Degree (Honours)

 
  Baccalaureate/Bachelor's Degree Baccalaureate/Bachelor's Degree: Honours

1.Depth and Breadth of Knowledge

a) a general knowledge and understanding of many key concepts, methodologies, theoretical approaches and assumptions in a discipline a) a developed knowledge of the key concepts, methodologies, current advances, theoretical approaches and assumptions in a discipline overall, as well as in a specialized area of a discipline
  b) a broad understanding of some of the major fields in a discipline, including, where appropriate, from an interdisciplinary perspective, and how the fields may intersect with fields in related disciplines b) a developed understanding of many of the major fields in a discipline, including, where appropriate, from an interdisciplinary perspective, and how the fields may intersect with fields in related disciplines
  c) an ability to gather, review, evaluate and interpret information relevant to one or more of the major fields in a discipline c) a developed ability to: i) gather, review, evaluate and interpret information; and ii) compare the merits of alternate hypotheses or creative options, relevant to one or more of the major fields in a discipline
  d) some detailed knowledge in an area of the discipline d) a developed, detailed knowledge of and experience in research in an area of the discipline
  e) critical thinking and analytical skills inside and outside the discipline e) developed critical thinking and analytical skills inside and outside the discipline
  f) the ability to apply learning from one or more areas outside the discipline f) the ability to apply learning from one or more areas outside the discipline
2.Knowledge of Methodologies

… an understanding of methods of enquiry or creative activity, or both, in their primary area of study that enables the student to:

evaluate the appropriateness of different approaches to solving problems using well established ideas and techniques; and
devise and sustain arguments or solve problems using these methods.

… an understanding of methods of enquiry or creative activity, or both, in their primary area of study that enables the student to:
evaluate the appropriateness of different approaches to solving problems using well established ideas and techniques;
devise and sustain arguments or solve problems using these methods; and
describe and comment upon particular aspects of current research or equivalent advanced scholarship.
3.Application of Knowledge a) qualities and transferable skills necessary for further study, employment, community involvement and other activities requiring:
the exercise of personal responsibility and decision-making;
working effectively with others;
a) qualities and transferable skills necessary for further study, employment, community involvement and other activities requiring:
the exercise of initiative, personal responsibility and accountability in both personal and group contexts;
working effectively with others;
decision-making in complex contexts;
  b) the ability to use a basic range of established techniques to:
i) analyse information;
ii) evaluate the appropriateness of different approaches to solving problems related to their area(s) of study;
iii) propose solutions; and
b) the ability to use a range of established techniques to:
i) initiate and undertake critical evaluation of arguments, assumptions, abstract concepts and information;
ii) propose solutions;
iii) frame appropriate questions for the purpose of solving a problem;
iv) solve a problem or create a new work; and
  c) the ability to make use of scholarly reviews and primary sources. c) the ability to make critical use of scholarly reviews and primary sources.
4. Communication Skills … the ability to communicate accurately and reliably, orally and in writing to a range of audiences. … the ability to communicate information, arguments, and analyses accurately and reliably, orally and in writing to a range of audiences.
5. Awareness of Knowledge … an understanding of the limits to their own knowledge and how this might influence their analyses and interpretations. … an understanding of the limits to their own knowledge and ability, and an appreciation of the uncertainty, ambiguity and limits to knowledge and how this might influence analyses and interpretations.
6. Autonomy and Professional Capacity a) qualities and transferable skills necessary for further study, employment, community involvement and other activities requiring:
the exercise of personal responsibility and decision-making;
working effectively with others;
a) qualities and transferable skills necessary for further study, employment, community involvement and other activities requiring:
the exercise of initiative, personal responsibility and accountability in both personal and group contexts;
working effectively with others;
decision-making in complex contexts;
  b) the ability to identify and address their own learning needs in changing circumstances and to select an appropriate program of further study; and b) the ability to manage their own learning in changing circumstances, both within and outside the discipline and to select an appropriate program of further study; and
  c) behaviour consistent with academic integrity and social responsibility. c) behaviour consistent with academic integrity and social responsibility.

http://www.oucqa.ca

Graduate Degree Level Expectations

DLEs Explained – The Six Expectations

There are six  Degree Level Expectations. They are:

  1. Depth and Breadth of Knowledge
  2. Research and Scholarship
  3. Level of Application of Knowledge
  4. Professional capacity/autonomy
  5. Level of communications skills
  6. Awareness of limits of knowledge

Expectations of a Master's Degree versus a Doctoral Degree

  Master's Degree Doctoral Degree
1. Depth and breadth of knowledge A systematic understanding of knowledge, including, where
appropriate, relevant knowledge outside the field and/or discipline, and a critical awareness of current problems and/or new insights, much of which is at, or informed by, the forefront of their academic discipline, field of study, or area of professional practice;   
A thorough understanding of a substantial body of knowledge that is at the forefront of their academic discipline
or area of professional practice including, where appropriate, relevant knowledge outside the field and/or discipline.
2. Research and Scholarship    conceptual understanding and methodological competence that
a) Enables a working comprehension of how established techniques of research and inquiry are used to create and
interpret knowledge in the discipline;
b) Enables a critical evaluation of current research and advanced research and scholarship in the discipline or area
of professional competence; and
c) Enables a treatment of complex issues and judgments based on established principles and techniques;and,
On the basis of that competence, has shown at least one of the following:
a) The development and support of a sustained argument in written form; or
b) Originality in the application of knowledge.
a) The ability to conceptualize, design, and implement research for the generation of new knowledge, applications, or understanding at the forefront of the discipline, and to adjust the research design or methodology in the light of unforeseen problems;
b) The ability to make informed judgments on complex issues in specialist fields, sometimes requiring new methods; and
c) The ability to produce original research, or other advanced scholarship, of a quality to satisfy peer review, and to merit publication.
3. Level of application of knowledge Competence in the research process by applying an existing body of knowledge in the critical analysis of a new question
or of a specific problem or issue in a new setting
The capacity to
a) Undertake pure and/or applied research at an advanced level; and
b) Contribute to the development of academic or professional skills, techniques, tools, practices, ideas, theories, approaches, and/or materials.
4. Professional capacity/autonomy a) The qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment requiring:
i) The exercise of initiative and of personal responsibility and accountability; and
ii) Decision-making in complex situations;
b) The intellectual independence required for continuing professional development;
c) The ethical behaviour consistent with academic integrity and the use of appropriate guidelines and procedures for responsible conduct of research; and
d) The ability to appreciate the broader implications of applying knowledge to particular contexts.
a) The qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment requiring the exercise of personal responsibility and largely autonomous initiative in complex situations;
b) The intellectual independence to be academically and professionally engaged and current;
c) The ethical behaviour consistent with academic integrity and the use of appropriate guidelines and procedures for responsible conduct of research; and
d) The ability to evaluate the broader implications of applying knowledge to particular contexts.
5. Level of communications skills The ability to communicate ideas, issues and conclusions clearly. The ability to communicate complex and/or ambiguous ideas, issues and conclusions clearly and effectively.
6. Awareness of limits of knowledge Cognizance of the complexity of knowledge and of the potential contributions of other interpretations, methods, and disciplines. An appreciation of the limitations of one’s own work and discipline, of the complexity of knowledge, and of the potential contributions of other interpretations, methods, and disciplines.