Cultural Studies

Cultural Studies

Interdisciplinary Graduate Program

Cultural Studies

Interdisciplinary Graduate Program

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Postdoctoral Researchers

​Jennifer Claire Robinson
​Jennifer holds an MA in Material and Visual Culture form the University College of London and a BA in Anthropology and History from the University of British Columbia.  Since 2012, she has held a much loved research position with a collective of Residential School Survivors, Elders, academics, artists, students, and heritage professionals known as the Residential and Indian Day School Art Research Program on the Coast Salish territories of Vancouver Island. Jennifer recently received her PhD in Visual Anthropology and Materiality from the University of Victoria. Her dissertation titled The Exhibition Landscape of Human Rights in Canada: An Ethnographic Study into Process and Design, funded through fellowships from the University of Victoria and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, assessed how human rights violations that have occurred in Canada have been curated, programmed, and researched through Canadian museums. She is very excited to take on the role of Post-Doctoral Fellow as of September 2017 with the Creative Conciliations research collective through Queen’s University. With this position, she hopes to continue to engage in critical dialogues concerning the need for institutions such as museums and universities to take an active role in producing decolonizing pedagogies concerning rights and justice and the essential role that art, artists, and creative research methodologies play in these debates currently underway in Canada. 

 

Aaron Franks (2015 - 2017)
BFA (Theatre), MA (Social Justice and Equity Studies), PhD (Human Geography)
Aaron has been a postdoctoral researcher in Cultural Studies since September 2015. After completing his PhD (Human Geography, Glasgow) he worked as an arts-based research specialist with the Centre for Environmental Health Equity. Currently Aaron works with Dr. Dylan Robinson on a variety of projects related to Indigenous creative practice and decolonization. He has recently initiated a new research program, Making Ground, bringing Indigenous and Scottish self-determination movements into critical dialogue through themes of performance, territory, and colonialism. His major research interests are in social movements, performance and political ecology. He is of mixed Métis-Muskego-European decent and is thankful for the continued assertion of Anishnaabe and Haudenosaunee territory where Queen’s sits. 
F401, Mackintosh-Corry Hall
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Kelsey Wrightson (2015 - 2016)
Kelsey Wrightson is from Edmonton, Alberta. She completed her PhD in Political Science at the University of British Columbia in 2015. She researched how museums and material culture support the political and cultural self-determination of First Nations in Canada. She examined “De T’a Hoti Ts’eeda: We Live Securely from the Land,” a collaboration between the Tłįcho Nation, National Museums Scotland, and the Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre, as an example of a “nation-to-nation” relationship. She also has a B.A in Political Science and an M.A in Cultural, Social and Political Thought from the University of Victoria, in which she compared the negotiation of Treaty Six (1876) and the current Treaty process in British Columbia.
She continues to research and write about Indigenous peoples arts and practices of sovereignty.