Department of Global Development Studies

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Global Development Studies

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DEVS Teaching Fellowship Opportuny Winter Term 2018

TEACHING FELLOW POSITION AVAILABLE – Winter Term 2018
DEVS 305/6.0 – Cuban Culture and Society
Departments of Film and Media and Global Development Studies

Queen’s University, Kingston, ON CAN K7L 3N6

The Departments of Film and Media and Global Development Studies at Queen’s University invites applications from suitably qualified candidates interested in co-teaching the Cuban Culture and Society course.  This is third year course with an expected enrolment of 40 students that takes place on campus and in Havana, Cuba.  Candidates should have a M.A. or M.Sc. or Ph.D., be fluent in Spanish, and teaching experience at the University level in Film and Media and/or in Global Development Studies.  This is a winter term appointment for the period January 1, 2018 to May 31, 2018, with classes in session from January 11, 2018 to April 6, 2018. Pre-Departure Sessions from April 26 to May 3, 2018, and Havana, Cuba session from May 5, 2018 to May 19, 2018.

The University invites applications from all qualified individuals.  Queen’s University is committed to employment equity and diversity in the workplace and welcomes applications from women, visible minorities, Aboriginal people, persons with disabilities, and LGBTQ persons.  All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority.

The University will provide support in its recruitment processes to applicants with disabilities, including accommodation that takes into account an applicant’s accessibility needs. If you require accommodation during this process, please contact: Global Development Studies, Barbra Brousseau, bb13@queensu.ca, 613-533-6000, extension 77210.

Graduate Teachings Assistants and Teaching Fellows at Queen's University are governed by the Collective Agreement for Teaching Assistants and Teaching Fellows between PSAC Local 901 and Queen's University which is posted at http://queensu.ca/facultyrelations/teaching-assistants-and-fellows/colle... Remuneration will be in accordance with the Collective Agreement, and appointments are subject to funding or enrolment criteria.

Applications should include a cover letter, a complete and current curriculum vitae, and a letter of reference from one (1) referee, as well as any other relevant materials the candidate wishes to submit for consideration such as a teaching dossier, or student evaluations, etc. 

Please arrange to have applications and supporting documentation sent directly to:

Ms. Barbra Brousseau, Departmental Administrator
Department of Global Development Studies
68 University Avenue
Mackintosh-Corry Hall, Suite B401, Queen’s University
Kingston Ontario Canada K7L 3N6
Email:  bb13@queensu.ca
http://www.queensu.ca/devs

Note: The letter of reference should be sent separately by a qualified referee who is familiar with the applicant's teaching experience.
Review of applications will begin on December 8, 2017 and will continue until the position is filled. The final appointment is subject to budgetary approval.

Posted:  November 22, 2017

Fueling Social Inclusion? Neo-Extractivism, State-Society Relations and Biofuel Policies in Latin America’s Southern Cone lecture by Diana Córdoba

Diana CordobaFueling Social Inclusion?  Neo-Extractivism, State-Society Relations and Biofuel Policies in Latin America’s Southern Cone

Presented by Diana Córdoba, SSHRC Postdoctoral researcher in the School of Environmental Studies at the University of Victoria

Scholarship on neo-extractivism agrees that this ‘post-neoliberal’ model relies on an inherent contradiction between the commitment to continue natural resource extraction and the need to legitimize these activities by using their revenues for poverty reduction. Using the cases of the national biofuel policies of the ‘postneoliberal’ governments of Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay, this presentation asks why and how these policies emerged and were implemented and how these can help us to explain the inherent contradictions embedded in neoextractivist policies. Adopting a strategic-relational approach to analyse state-society interaction, I argue that the scope of progressive policies is largely conditioned by pre-existing social structures and institutions and state-society interaction. In this talk, I show how progressive reforms intersect with the prevailing interests of agribusiness and state actors and are recast and used for different ends as these interact with powerful actors such as the multinational soybean complex and agrarian movements. I conclude that the prevailing overemphasis on the politics of domination and contestation in the debates on neo-extractivism overlooks the multiple and complex rural responses of the different progressive governments and obscure the possibilities to explore the ruptures and continuities of these governments with previous models, and therefore fail to recognize state’s advances.

Please join us on Thursday November 16, 2017 in Ellis Hall, Room 327 from 1:30 PM to 3:00 PM

Developing Extractivism: Chinese investments in Brazilian agribusiness and infrastructure for South American integration lecture by Gustavo de L. T. Oliveira

Gustavo de L. T. OliveiraDeveloping Extractivism: Chinese investments in Brazilian agribusiness and infrastructure for South American integration

Presented by:  Dr. Gustavo de L. T. Oliveira, Consortium for Faculty Diversity Postdoctoral Fellow, Visiting Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies, Swarthmore College

South America became a major supplier of soybeans, iron ore, petroleum, and other agroindustrial and mineral commodities to China since 2000. Since then, Chinese companies began seeking investments that could secure flows and profits from these commodities across the continent. When Chinese investments spiked in Brazil around 2010, however, they triggered widespread concern that such resource-seeking investments and “land grabbing” for agricultural exports would further “de-industrialize” Brazil and condemn the country to a neocolonial dependence on natural resource extraction with high environmental costs but low value added or domestic employment. In my doctoral research, where I combined political economy with critical global ethnography in 20 months of fieldwork in Brazil and 7 months in China, I investigated all Chinese agribusiness investments in Brazil and revealed that large-scale land grabs have not actually characterized the core of this phenomenon due to managerial incapacity of Chinese investors and social resistance that triggered government restrictions on acquisition of farmland, disproportionately affecting Chinese companies. Yet another set of Chinese investors pursued distinct strategies through transnational mergers and acquisitions of transnational companies operating up- and downstream from farming itself, and successfully gained significant market-share and strategic footholds in Brazilian agribusiness through their Brazilian-operated subsidiaries. While the latter also escaped social resistance, they nevertheless accelerate agroindustrial extraction from Brazil, and consolidate the power of transnational elites emerging from China and Brazil to set their countries’ model of development. In my new research project, I extend this research to a political ecology of infrastructure for South American integration – and outline here the foundation for my investigation of how an influx of Chinese capital is expanding the development of fluvial ports and waterways on the Plata basin to facilitate extraction of mineral and agroindustrial resources from Brazil, Bolivia, and Paraguay, enabling them to be exported to China from new deep-water ports in Argentina and Uruguay. Altogether, this research trajectory reveals some of the most significant new transformations in the international political economy of natural resource extraction through agroindustrial expansion and infrastructure development.

Please join us on Friday November 10, 2017 in Dunning Hall, Room 14 from 9:15 AM to 10:45 AM

Thieves of Patria: Political Geology of Plurinational Bolivia lecture by Andrea Marston

Andrea MarstonThieves of Patria: Political Geology of Plurinational Bolivia

Presented by Andrea Marston, PhD Candidate, Geography, UC Berkeley, USA

Bolivian mining cooperatives are commonly described as mobsters, savage capitalists, and thieves of national wealth. Nevertheless, these small-scale miners have won significant influence in Bolivia’s radically restructured Plurinational State, in which the rights of both indigenous peoples and Pachamama (Earth Mother) have been constitutionally enshrined since 2009. This presentation explores the “political geology” of mining in plurinational Bolivia through an analysis of the grounded politics of tin mining cooperatives in the highland towns of Llallagua-Uncía, Potosí. I argue that these precarious collectives, formed in the geologized contact zone of Indigenous agricultural communities and ruined trade unionism, demand a retheorization of plurinationalism that centers the subsoil and the figures that labor within it. Although state-territory relations have been reorganized in the plurinational era, the subsoil remains imbued with 20th century masculinist and mestizo dreams of progress, and these ideals continue to shape resource extractivism even in an era of putatively indigenous nation-building. Cooperative miners, the paradoxical subjects of the plurinational state, have been shaped by their labors in this subterranean world and are now shaping the institutions that structure Bolivia’s political economy.

Please join us on Wednesday November 8, 2017 in MacDonald Hall, Room 4 from 10:30 AM to 12:00 PM

DEVS Alumni in Action Connecting Canada With the 'Third World'

Adam Houston is a DEVS Alumnus (MA 2012) using innovative ways to explain the connections between Canada and the 'Third World.' In an article published October 6, 2017 in the Ottawa Citizen, he discusses the global implications that legal Canadian marijuana might mean to the Kingdom of Lesotho. Adam connected with his co-author on this piece, Rapelang Radebe, while conducting his MA thesis research in South Africa.

http://ottawacitizen.com/opinion/columnists/what-legal-canadian-weed-might-mean-to-the-kingdom-of-lesotho

Photo of alumnus Adam Houston with a model dinosaur

DEVS MA Alumnus Adam Houston

DEVS 305: Cuban Culture and Society Course Applications accepted until 31Oct2017

The Queen’s Cuban Culture and Society course (DEVS 305) remains open for applications!  

Applications will be accepted until October 31, 2017 for DEVS 305 "Cuban Culture and Society", an interdisciplinary course six-unit course which takes place at Queen’s during the winter semester and at the University of Havana in May 2018.  Details and application forms are available on the DEVS website http://www.queensu.ca/devs/undergraduate/international-study-program-cuba

For more information, please do not hesitate to drop into the DEVS office located in Mackintosh-Corry Hall, B401 or send an email to develstu@queensu.ca

DEVS 305 Students 2016-2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DEVS 305 students in Havana, Cuba in May 2017

Diamonds are Forever: Extraction, Subsistence, and the Northern Mixed Economy lecture by Rebecca Hall

Rebecca HallDiamonds are Forever: Extraction, Subsistence, and the Northern Mixed Economy

Canadian diamonds, mined primarily in the Northwest Territories, have come to represent the “ethical” alternative to the so-called “blood diamonds” of elsewhere. In particular, the industry has been lauded for its commitment to consulting Indigenous communities, and contracting Indigenous businesses and workers.

The diamond mines were established in the context of the northern mixed economy, which combines Indigenous and settler governance structures, and modes of production. Drawing on her fieldwork in the Yellowknife region, Dr. Hall will discuss the impact the diamond mines have had on the complex social relations that make up the mixed economy, women’s experiences of the diamond mines, and demonstrates that the romance and purity ascribed to Canadian diamonds runs counter to the colonial continuities evident in this new northern extractive regime.

Please join us on Monday October 16, 2017 in Dunning Hall, Room 11 from 1:00 PM to 2:30 PM

Assistant Professor Tenure Track Position in The Political Economy of Extraction and Development (Applications due 15Sept2017)

​The Department of Global Development Studies in the Faculty of Arts and Science at Queen’s University invites applications for a Tenure-track faculty position at the rank of Assistant Professor in the field of The Political Economy of Extraction and Development, with a preferred starting date of July 1, 2018.

The successful applicant would examine extractivism and emerging technologies in areas such as mining, agriculture, energy, forestry or fisheries with a key focus on the differential impacts upon community, ecology, health and sustainable livelihoods. We seek an innovative researcher and educator interested in exploring global/local levels of scholarly and experiential engagement. The geographic focus of research is open, but applicants with an interest in Latin American and/or indigenous peoples are preferred. DEVS is enriched intellectually, socially and culturally by the presence and participation of people from diverse educational backgrounds, including from the Global South.

Candidates must have a PhD or equivalent degree completed at the start date of the appointment. The main criteria for selection are academic and teaching excellence. The successful candidate will provide evidence of strong potential for outstanding teaching contributions at the undergraduate and graduate levels, including the ability to teach two or more of our core courses.  S/he will be expected to work collaboratively with other members of the department in the area of curriculum design.  The successful candidate will provide evidence of high quality scholarly output that demonstrates potential for independent research moving beyond the dissertation and leading to peer assessed publications.  Methodological innovation and comfort with current and emergent teaching technologies are considered assets. Candidates must provide evidence of strong communicative and interpersonal skills, combined with a flexible attitude and ability to work in an interdisciplinary and collaborative environment. The successful candidate will be required to make substantive contributions through service to the department, the Faculty, the University, and/or the broader community. Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience.

The University invites applications from all qualified individuals. Queen’s is committed to employment equity and diversity in the workplace and welcomes applications from women, visible minorities, Aboriginal peoples, persons with disabilities, and LGBTQ persons.  All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, in accordance with Canadian immigration requirements, Canadian citizens and permanent residents of Canada will be given priority.

To comply with federal laws, the University is obliged to gather statistical information as to how many applicants for each job vacancy are Canadian citizens / permanent residents of Canada.  Applicants need not identify their country of origin or citizenship, however, all applications must include one of the following statements: “I am a Canadian citizen / permanent resident of Canada”; OR, “I am not a Canadian citizen / permanent resident of Canada”. Applications that do not include this information will be deemed incomplete.

A complete application consists of:

  • a cover letter (including one of the two statements regarding Canadian citizenship / permanent resident status specified in the previous paragraph);
  • a current Curriculum Vitae (including a list of publications);
  • a statement of research interests;
  • a teaching dossier or a  statement of teaching interests and experience (including teaching outlines and evaluations if available); and,
  • a sample of academic writing

Short-listed candidates will be asked to provide three letters of reference.

The deadline for applications is September 15, 2017.

Applicants are encouraged to send all documents in their application package electronically (either as PDFs or MS Word files) to Barbra Brousseau at bb13@queensu.ca, although hard copy applications may be submitted to:

Dr. Marc Epprecht, Department Head
The Department of Global Development Studies
Mackintosh-Corry Hall B401
Queen’s University
Kingston, Ontario CANADA K7L 3N6

The University will provide support in its recruitment processes to applicants with disabilities, including accommodation that takes into account an applicant’s accessibility needs.  If you require accommodation during the interview process, please contact Barbra Brousseau in the Department of Global Development Studies, at 613-533-6000 x77210; bb13@queensu.ca

Academic staff at Queen’s University are governed by a Collective Agreement between the University and the Queen’s University Faculty Association (QUFA), which is posted at http://queensu.ca/facultyrelations/faculty-librarians-and-archivists/col... and at http://www.qufa.ca

Congratulations to Noelle Bauman for successfully defending DEVS MA thesis.

Noelle BaumannDEVS MA Student Successfully Defends MA Thesis

Congratulations to Noelle Bauman for successfully defending her thesis entitled "Stories of ‘Born-Again’ Women in Uganda: Epistemic Violence, Visceral Faith, and Subversive Performances of Subjectivity" on Wednesday August 30, 2017.

Thank you to committee members:  Dr. Michael Doxtater (Chair), Dr. Villia Jefremovas (Supervisor), Dr. Allison Goebel (External Examiner), and Dr. Marc Epprecht (Internal Examiner).

 

Congratulations to Laura Myers for successfully defending DEVS MA thesis.

Laura MyersDEVS MA Student Successfully Defends MA Thesis

Congratulations to Laura Myers for successfully defending her thesis entitled "When You Change the Life of a Woman, You Change a Nation": Analyzing the Experiences of Indigenous Women's Organizations and Organizers in Canada on Monday August 28, 2017.

Thank you to committee members:  Dr. Marc Epprecht (Chair), Dr. Villia Jefremovas (Supervisor), Janice Hill (External Examiner), and Professor Robert Lovelace (Internal Examiner).

 

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