Department of Global Development Studies

Queen's University
Search Type

DEPARTMENT OF

Global Development Studies

site header

DEVS Course Offerings (2016-2017)

100 and 200 Level 300 Level 400 Level Fourth Year Seminar Courses
DEVS 100 DEVS 300 DEVS 410 DEVS 492 TOPIC ID  002 (Fall 2016)
DEVS 220 DEVS 305 DEVS 411 DEVS 492 TOPIC ID:  004 (Winter 2017)
DEVS 221 DEVS 311 DEVS 420 DEVS 492 TOPIC ID:  006 (Fall 2016)
DEVS 230 DEVS 320 DEVS 480 DEVS 492 TOPIC ID:  007 (Winter 2017)
DEVS 240 DEVS 330   DEVS 492 TOPIC ID:  008 (Fall 2016)
DEVS 250 DEVS 340 500 Level DEVS 492 TOPIC ID:  010 (Winter 2017)
DEVS 292 TOPIC ID 001 DEVS 392 TOPIC ID 005 DEVS 501 DEVS 492  TOPIC ID:  013 (Winter 2017)
  DEVS 392 TOPIC ID 006 DEVS 502 DEVS 492 TOPIC ID:  014 (Fall 2016)
      DEVS 492 TOPIC ID:  015 (Winter 2017)
       
       

 

For information about our semester abroad program please visit the main office for Global Development Studies or send your questions to develstu@queensu.ca.

If you have questions about our directed reading course or are interested in the thesis option please contact the Undergraduate Chair at devs.ugchair@queensu.ca.

For more detailed course information please visit our faculty pages.  

DEVS 100/6.0 - Fall/Winter

Instructors:  David McDonald (Fall) and Karen Dubinsky (Winter)

Course Title: Canada and the "Third World"

Introduces basic theoretical concepts of development studies, the history of global inequality, the role of local and transnational actors and institutions such as the World Bank, key debates in development policy, and short histories of alternative development strategies. Case studies of Canada's ties to the so-called "third world" will include missionaries, military, business, and aid. Canadian colonialism over First Nations peoples will introduce basic issues in Aboriginal Studies.

NOTE Also offered as a distance course. Consult Continuing and Distance Studies at http://www.queensu.ca/artsci_online/courses/canada-and-the-third-world

Return to top

DEVS 220/3.0 - Fall

Instructor:  Robert Lovelace

Course Title: Introduction to Aboriginal Studies

An introduction to Aboriginal world view and culture organized on an historical basis, from Creation to 1969, emphasizing Aboriginal culture and experience in Canada. Aboriginal perspectives will be introduced through traditional teaching methods and contributions from elders and other community members. Syllabus (PDF 513KB)

NOTE: Also offered as a distance course in alternate years. Consult Continuing and Distance Studies at http://www.queensu.ca/artsci_online/

Return to top

DEVS 221/3.0 - Winter

Instructor: Robert Lovelace

Course Title: Topics in Aboriginal Studies

Re-evaluation of conventional knowledge based on aboriginal world view and culture and the introduction of a decolonized perspective on contemporary issues. Guest speakers will provide detailed examinations of specific topics such as current issues in Aboriginal spirituality, art, education and politics.

NOTE: Also offered as a distance course. Consult Continuing and Distance Studies at http://www.queensu.ca/artsci_online/courses/topics-in-aboriginal-studies

LEARNING HOURS 120 (36L;84P) PREREQUISITE Level 2 or above. DEVS 220/3.0 or permission of the Department of Global Development Studies.

Return to top

DEVS 230/3.0 - Fall

Instructor:  Mark Hostetler

Course Title: The Global Political Economy of Development

This course introduces students to important debates, concepts and themes in the global political economy of development. Using a political economy perspective, we examine how different types of power relations are formed around the production, distribution and consumption of goods across local, national and international settings. We also examine how these power relations structure the institutions, processes and outcomes of global development.  The course proceeds historically starting with an examination of the ways in which post-colonial countries were integrated into the world economy in the decades following the Second World War. Subsequently, we use this as a basis to examine more contemporary issues including good governance, free trade, and corporate social responsibility. No prior study of economics is needed for this course – we will be concerned with the real world of development, not abstract mathematical models.

NOTE: Also offered as a distance course. Consult Continuing and Distance Studies at http://www.queensu.ca/artsci_online/courses/the-global-political-economy-of-development

PREREQUISITE DEVS 100/6.0 (DEVS 100/6.0 can be taken concurrently in exceptional circumstances).

 Return to top

DEVS 240/3.0 - Winter

Instructor:  Marc Epprecht

Course Title: Culture and Development

This course will explore how theories and practices of 'development' are entwined with different conceptions of culture. It starts by examining how the West constructed itself as the civilising force in the world and viewed the mass poverty of 'Third World' peoples as a product of their conservative traditions and cultural practices. The course will examine ways that colonial perceptions and practices still imbue development discourse today, and how they are being challenged. How have new social movements, art forms, and technologies opened up to engage with, resist and contest the current model of market driven development, and how does the latter incorporate or co-opt the critiques? Specific topics will include science, religion, sports, art and music. After completing the course, students should be able to demonstrate a critical awareness of everyday events in the Global South and among indigenous peoples as reported, for example, in the media or as performed through hip hop and the many other forms of resistance culture.

PREREQUISITES DEVS 100/6.0 and DEVS 230/3.0. (DEVS 100/6.0 can be taken concurrently in exceptional circumstances).

Return to top

DEVS 250/3.0 - Fall

Instructor:  Marcus Taylor

Course Title: Global Environmental Transformations

Examines  the  relationship  between  development  and  environmental  change  by  introducing  social  science  perspectives  on  themes  including energy,  agriculture,  climate,  urbanisation  and  water.  With  a  focus  on  combining macro-¬‐ and micro-¬‐ analysis, the course reflects on the meaning of development in an era of global environmental transformation.

PREREQUISITES DEVS 100/6.0 or permission of the department.

Return to top

DEVS 292 TOPIC ID: 001/3.0 - Fall

Instructor:  Milad Dokhanchi

Course Title: Islam, Politics and Development

This course introduces students to the ideas of key Islamist thinkers that have informed Muslim politics in the face of western colonialism, the modern state, capitalist globalization and cultural imperialism. Attention will also be paid to Ibn Khaldun’s distinction between nomadic and sedentary ways of life may as a framework for studying development in relation to contemporary politics in the Muslim world. Concepts and practices such as Islamic Marxism, Islamic environmentalism, Islamic banking and Islamic state will be discussed while exploring the political context in which "Islamic alternatives" have been able to win the support of Muslims in global politics. Students will be asked to read primary sources in English, discuss them in class and contextualize Muslims’ responses to modernity from within the Islamic intellectual and political tradition.

PREREQUISITES DEVS 100/6.0 or permission of the department.

Return to top

DEVS 300/3.0 - Winter

Instructor:  Villia Jefremovas

Course Title: Cross-Cultural Research Methods

How do we go from an idea or question to designing a research project to answer it?  Students will learn how to prepare and design cross-cultural research projects for international development work, to understand and use selected methods from a critical perspective, to understand important elements underlying successful fieldwork and to learn to develop a development research proposal. We will cover research design, choosing the instruments, cross-checking and in-the-field analysis, entering the field, choosing the informants, analyzing the data and proposal writing.

PREREQUISITES DEVS 100/6.0 and DEVS 230/3.0 and DEVS 240/3.0 (DEVS 100/6.0 can be taken concurrently with DEVS 230/3.0 or DEVS 240/3.0 in exceptional circumstances).

Return to top

DEVS 305/6.0 - Winter

Instructors:  Karen Dubinsky and Susan Lord (Sabbatical 2016/2017)

Course Title: Cuban Culture and Society

This course is designed to introduce students to Cuban society and culture. The course will focus especially on the period from the Cuban revolution (1959) to the present. Students will examine some of the main events and highlights of Cuban history, politics and culture in this era. Two weeks of this four-week intensive course will take place at Queen's and two weeks at the University of Havana.

NOTES

  1. Students are expected to pay an ancillary fee for travel and accommodation while in Havana. Estimated cost $2500.
  2. Students must apply to take the course. Applications are available in the DEVS office.
  3. Students are expected to attend a pre-departure orientation.
  4. Costs and application deadlines will be posted on the DEVS website.

Devs 305, an interdisciplinary course 6.0 unit course which also counts towards degree requirements in the departments of Film and Media Studies, Sociology, Languages, Literatures and Cultures, and History, will be taught over Winter and part of Spring term. T

PREREQUISITE Level 3 or above and registration in any Arts and Science Plan.

For more information see Global Development Studies department website: http://queensu.ca/devs/undergraduate/international-study-program-cuba
See also Queen's Cuban Culture and Society course page on Facebook www.facebook.com/QueensCubanCultureAndSocietyCourse

 Return to top

DEVS 311/3.0 - Winter

Instructor:   Marcus Taylor

Course Title: Labour and Global Development

Explores the relationships between the production of goods, the lives and livelihoods of workers, and socio-economic development at local, national and global levels. Issues include: the international division of labour; global commodity chains; technological change; labour markets; informal sector; genders in production; unions and labour rights. 

PREREQUISITES DEVS 100/6.0 and DEVS 230/3.0.

Return to top

DEVS 320/3.0 - Fall

Instructor:  Marc Epprecht

Course Title:  AIDS, Power, and Poverty

HIV/AIDS remains one of the most pressing development issues in the world today.  This course examines the cultural, political, economic, and other social factors that contribute to its transmission and intractability, and which help to explain the differential impact of the disease upon societies worldwide.  Particular attention is paid to the ways that specific social/sexual identities and practices arising from inequitable class, gender, race, and ethnic relations, affect the prevalence of HIV, the ability to contain its spread, and the human costs that it entails. 

PREREQUISITES    One of:  DEVS 100/6.0, DEVS 200/3.0, DEVS 210/3.0,  DEVS 220/3.0, DEVS 221/3.0, DEVS 230/3.0, HLTH 101/3.0; and third-year standing.

Return to top

DEVS 330/3.0 - Winter

Instructor:   Mark Hostetler

Course Title: Technology and Development

This course teams Art Sci and App Sci students to explore and analyse different theoretical and practical perspectives on technology and development and then apply there evolving collective understanding to the creation of a proposal for a technology related development project. Throughout the course, we introduce students to the socio-economic, cultural and political factors surrounding technology and its relationship to the development in both advanced industrial societies and developing nations. We focus in particular on the interaction of politics and policy with technological choice and design, critically exploring ideas including appropriate, intermediate and sustainable technologies.

PREREQUISITE Level 3 or above and (registration in any DEVS Plan or registration in any Applied Science Program), or permission of the Department.

Return to top

DEVS 340/3.0 - Fall

Instructor:   Paritosh Kumar

Course Title: Theories of Development

Provides students with an overview of theories that underpin the development enterprise, and critiques of development, through the use of primary texts and critical appraisals. Syllabus

PREREQUISITES DEVS 100/6.0 and DEVS 230/3.0 and DEVS 240/3.0. (DEVS 100/6.0 can be taken concurrently with DEVS 230/3.0 or DEVS 240/3.0 in exceptional circumstances).

Return to top

DEVS 392 TOPIC ID: 005/3.0 - Fall

Instructor:  Villia Jefremovas

Course Title:  Indigenous People

Who is indigenous and why have they come to be known as indigenous? What rights should indigenous peoples have? How does our understanding of indigeneity affect the lives of indigenous peoples and their rights? What do these debates mean for development policy and practice? Using examples from both settlers states, in which pre-existing populations have been displaced by large scale migrations of culturally different populations, such as Canada, US, and Australia; and those in which the majority populations and indigenous populations have been differentiated by the processes of the processes of resistance, assimilation and conquest, such as the Philippines, Indonesia, Tanzania, and Guatemala, we will consider this in local, regional, national and international perspective.

PREREQUISITE Level 3 or above and registration in any DEVS Plan, or permission of the Department.

Return to top

DEVS 392 TOPIC ID: 006/3.0 - Winter

Instructor:  Susanne Soederberg

Course Title:  Business and Development

Over the past several decades, business – particularly large multinational corporations - have come to play an increasingly dominant role in global development. This course will interrogate the structures, processes and practices employed by corporations as they forge new partnerships with states, inter-governmental organizations (e.g., the United Nations), non-governmental organizations. In so doing, we will use lectures, tutorials and case studies to learn about the anatomy of corporate power (legal structure, governance and decision making processes) and how this power is brokered across the globe through themes such as: divestment campaigns, microcredit, and shelter loans for slum dwellers, corporate philanthropy, disaster management, the sustainable development goals, and corporate social responsibility.

PREREQUISITE Level 3 or above and registration in any DEVS Plan, or permission of the Department.

Return to top

DEVS 410/6.0 Summer

Instructor:   Please contact the DEVS office

Course Title: Work Placement in Development Studies

Provides students with first-hand experience working with an agency involved in international development, either in Canada or abroad. The placement will normally be for 10-20 weeks, to be negotiated with the sponsoring agency. Students are required to attend preparatory meetings, prepare a work-study proposal, a research paper on the placement and maintain a journal on a continuing basis while on their placement. In addition to academic requirements, students are required to enroll in the Queen's Emergency Support Program, attend pre-departure orientation and complete Queen's Off-Campus Activity Safety Policy (OCASP) requirements.

NOTE Students are normally responsible for all costs associated with participation in this course.

PREREQUISITES Level 3 or above and registration in the DEVS Major Plan and departmental approval in advance from the Head of Global Development Studies.

COREQUISITE DEVS 411/3.0 (Under special circumstances a student can substitute DEVS 502/3.0 (Directed Readings in Development Studies) for DEVS 411/3.0. Permission for the latter may be granted to students who have completed all other degree requirements, and who do not need to return to Queen's University campus following completion of their placement. Students must seek prior approval from the Placement Coordinator, Global Development Studies for this option).

EXCLUSION No more than 1 course from DEVS 410/6.0; DEVS 420/3.0; DEVS 432/6.0.

Return to top

DEVS 411/3.0 Fall 

Instructor:   Please contact the DEVS office

Course Title: Post Placement Seminar in Development Studies

Required for students who have successfully completed the course requirements for DEVS 410. The course will provide a forum for students to debrief and to critically examine their placement experience. Evaluation based on presentation, participation, journal synthesis and a final report.

PREREQUISITE DEVS 410/6.0 and Level 3 or above and registration in the DEVS Major Plan and departmental approval in advance from the Placement Coordinator, Global Development Studies.

ONE-WAY EXCLUSION May not be taken with or after DEVS 420/3.0; DEVS 421/3.0.

Return to top

DEVS 420/3.0 - Fall

Instructor:   Please contact the DEVS office

Course Title: Study Placement in Development Studies

Participation in an organized educational or cultural exchange, either

i) one term of studies at a developing-country university, or

ii) an exchange program in a developing-country setting with an organization such as Canada World Youth or Shastri Indo-Canadian Institute for at least 6 weeks.

Students are required to prepare a work-study proposal, a risk assessment of their placement and attend a pre-departure orientation. Assessment will also be based on a journal and final report.

NOTE Students are normally responsible for all costs associated with this course.

PREREQUISITES Level 3 or above and registration in the DEVS Major or Medial Plan and departmental approval in advance from the Placement Coordinator, Global Development Studies.

EXCLUSION No more than 1 course from DEVS 410/6.0; DEVS 420/3.0;

EXCLUSION No more than 3.0 units from DEVS 420/3.0; DEVS 421/3.0.

Return to top

DEVS 492 TOPIC ID: 002 / DEVS 861 (Seminar) - Fall 

Instructor:  Paritosh Kumar

Course Title: Development and the Global Agrofood System

There can be little doubt that the current era is witnessing dramatic change in the global production and consumption of food. In some respects this represents that continuation of previous trends. However, in number of important ways agricultural restructuring in the late twentieth century appears completely new.  Using a diverse disciplinary perspective, this course analyses key aspects of contemporary changes in the global agro-food system. Topics covered will range from industrialization and corporate control of food and farming, the geography of more 'flexible' forms of manufacturing and service provisions, feminization of agricultural labour, localized and place-based agriculture, non-agricultural uses of agro-food resources, financialization of food, food sovereignty to new landscapes of consumption, changing forms of political organization and protests and the relationship between food and culture, specifically how communities and societies identify and express themselves through food.

Taught concurrently with DEVS 861/3.0.

PREREQUISITE  Level 4 and registration in the DEVS Major or Medial Plan, or permission of the Department.

EXCLUSION No more than 3.0 units from DEVS 492 TOPIC ID:002/3.0, DEVS 861/3.0.

Return to top

DEVS 492 TOPIC ID: 004/ DEVS 866 (Seminar)/3.0 - Fall 

Instructor:  Susanne Soederberg

Course Title: Debt and Dispossession

There is a spectre haunting our everyday lives: debt. Government debt, corporate debt and increasingly levels of consumer debt have become key concerns for policymakers and ordinary citizens alike. This course starts from the assumption that debt is more than simply an economic or legal phenomenon; instead it must be seen as a social, political and historical relation. On this view, we explore the material, discursive and institutional dimensions of different kinds and facets of debt ranging from financial debacles to sovereign debt crises (Ireland, Detroit), credit cards and student loans. We also examine the power underlying debtor-creditor relations across a variety of scales ranging from the urban to the global. The darker side of debt will also be studied. In so doing, we interrogate the coercive practices tied to dispossession such as the social stigma, stress, and isolation brought about by defaults, evictions, bankruptcies and debt collection.

Taught concurrently with DEVS 866/3.0

PREREQUISITE  Level 4 and registration in the DEVS Major or Medial Plan, or permission of the Department.

EXCLUSION No more than 3.0 units from DEVS 492 TOPIC ID:  004/3.0, DEVS 866/3.0.

Return to top

DEVS 492 TOPIC ID: 006/ DEVS 869 (Seminar) - Winter

Instructor:  Susanne Soederberg

Course Title: Global Governance

Like many fashionable terms in academia and policymaking circles, global governance has all too often escaped critical evaluation. Situating this moving target in the wider context of global political economy, we interrogate the institutional, discursive and regulatory features of global governance by exploring a wide variety of contemporary themes and issues, such as global trade, global aid, global risk management, the rule of law, slum rehabilitation, planetary gentrification, corruption and tax havens, and so forth across varied levels of governance ranging from global institutions (World Trade Organisation, European Union, World Bank, World Economic Forum, UN-HABITAT) to national and municipal institutions. In so doing, we ask: who benefits from global governance? Whose values are being promoted, and why? And, finally, who and/or is to be governed, and why?

Taught concurrently with DEVS 869/3.0

PREREQUISITE  Level 4 and registration in the DEVS Major or Medial Plan, or permission of the Department.

EXCLUSION No more than 3.0 units from DEVS 492 TOPIC ID:  006/3.0, DEVS 869/3.0.

Return to top

DEVS 492 TOPIC ID: 007/DEVS 862 (Seminar) - WINTER

Instructor:  Marcus Taylor

Course Title: Climate Change and Global Development

Climate change is roundly acknowledged as a significant threat to lives and livelihoods in developing countries. In this seminar we examine a range of analytical perspectives that seek to conceptualise the interface between climate change and development including the idea of climate change adaptation, vulnerability analyses, livelihoods approaches, resilience and political ecology. Using case study material from both rural and urban settings across a range of countries, we apply these perspectives to highlight what each reveals about climate-development interface and how each might influence the policy process in different, potentially conflicting ways

Taught concurrently with DEVS 862/3.0 .

PREREQUISITE  Level 4 and registration in the DEVS Major or Medial Plan, or permission of the Department.

EXCLUSION No more than 3.0 units from DEVS 492 TOPIC ID: 007/3.0, DEVS 862/3.0.

Return to top

DEVS 492 TOPIC ID: 008/DEVS 863 (Seminar)/3.0 - FALL

Instructor:  Richard Day

Course Title:  The Global Insurrection   

From the 'Arab Spring' to the suburbs of France, from the Gezi Park encampment in Turkey to Hong Kong's pro-democracy movement, people all over the world are taking to the streets in defiance of their governments, in actions that go beyond mere protest in intensity, duration, and effects upon the societies in which they occur. Although these insurrections only rarely result in 'the people' taking state power, as in the classical understanding of insurrection, they do point the way to new ways of organizing our lives, based on decision-making through assemblies, horizontal structures of power, and meeting basic needs without the 'help' of states and corporations. They propose, and experiment with, concrete alternatives to the discourse of development, in general, and global neoliberalism in particular.

Taught concurrently with DEVS 863/3.0.

PREREQUISITE  Level 4 and registration in the DEVS Major or Medial Plan, or permission of the Department.

EXCLUSION No more than 3.0 units from DEVS 492 TOPIC ID: 008/3.0, DEVS 863/3.0.

Return to top

DEVS 492 TOPIC ID: 010/DEVS 868 (Seminar) - Winter

Instructor:    Villia Jefremovas

Course Title: Rural Development  

The importance of agriculture and natural resource management in transforming society has been an on-going debate historically, academically, and has been central to development thought. This course, will delve into the role of theories and assumptions in delineating the nature of the problems in agriculture and natural resource management to be solved by ‘development;’ in constructing policies, the interventions and the outcomes of these interventions. It will explore the ways in which the role of the beneficiaries of development/policy and the role of the state, as well as the roles of individuals, communities and NGOs in development, are understood focusing on community development, and participatory research. Development will not be viewed as if it began in 1945, but rather will be seen as beginning in the late 18th c in Europe, with the expansion of the colonial world and with the development of capitalism, during which time the first purposive plans to transform society were implemented in Europe, North America and in the European colonial empires, so colonial policy as well as post-independence policies will be an integral aspect of our discussion, as will the central role of European social, political and economic thought.

Taught concurrently with DEVS 868/3.0.

PREREQUISITE  Level 4 and registration in the DEVS Major or Medial Plan, or permission of the Department.

EXCLUSION No more than 3.0 units from DEVS 492 TOPIC ID: 010/3.0, DEVS 868/3.0.

Return to top

DEVS 492 TOPIC ID: 013//DEVS 867 (Seminar) - Winter
Instructor:    Paritosh Kumar

Course Title: Exploring Development:  The two India's of the 21st Century

India entered the twenty-first century with profound changes in its economy, politics and society. An authoritarian right-wing formation of the Hindu nationalist party came to dominate India’s political scene, dumping secular principles for a threatening religious posturing. In the sphere of foreign policy, India discarded its strong Southern commitment to a non-aligned foreign policy. The most noteworthy development, however, was in the economic sphere where the country quickly went from being one of the most insulated economics to adopting a neo-liberal model of integration into the world capitalist system. While India has experienced spectacular growth recently, it has also led to staggering inequalities, resource extraction, regional imbalances, rise of religious fundamentalism and large scale dispossession and dislocation of rural populations.

Using India as a case study, this course offers an analytical introduction to the historical and contemporary theories of development with a special emphasis on critical perspectives. Drawing upon an interdisciplinary set of readings in history, sociology, political science, geography and anthropology, we will pay careful attention to the ways a study constructs, employs or challenges the idea of “development”. This critical reading of development literature will also lead us to explore a range of regional issues in India including Dalit (lower caste) politics, poverty, resource extraction, agrarian change, industrial transformation, service-sector development, women’s movements, emergence and growth of religious conflicts, environmental politics and sustainability. We will use what we learn about the Indian situation to engage with a set of questions that have to do with the future not only of India, but indeed, the current path of development itself.

Taught concurrently with DEVS 867/3.0.

PREREQUISITE  Level 4 and registration in the DEVS Major or Medial Plan, or permission of the Department.

EXCLUSION No more than 3.0 units from DEVS 492 TOPIC ID:  013/3.0, DEVS 867/3.0.

Return to top

DEVS 492 TOPIC ID: 014/DEVS 865 (Seminar) - Fall

Instructor:    Ayca Tomac

Course Title:  Alliance Politics, Solidarity Movements in the Global Context

This course provides an overview of a variety of dissident social movements from around the world with a specific focus on solidarity praxis. It situates itself in relation to both academic and "activist" perspectives on the interconnected power relations such as colonialism, nationalism, neoliberal capitalism and heteropatriarchy in the global context while tracing the dissident engagements with these power relations such as feminist, LGBTQ, socialist, anarchist and anti-colonial movements. Utilizing the critical scholarship on social movements, alliance politics and solidarity building, the course will focus on the relevance and significance of solidarity praxis while analyzing the intersections and interrelations of historical and current tendencies within the dissident movements. The course will equip students with tools to critically engage with the constructions of concepts like identity, "activism", collective action and street politics along with social movements such as indigenous resurgence, feminist, anti-heterosexist organizing and the so-called "Arab Spring", "Occupy" and "Gezi".

EXCLUSIONS:  No more than 3.0 units from DEVS 392 TOPIC ID 001 (offered in 2015F); DEVS 492 TOPIC ID 015; DEVS 865

PREREQUISITES Level 4 and registration in the DEVS Major or Medial Plan, or permission of the Department.

NOTE Taught concurrently with DEVS 865/3.0.

Return to top

DEVS 492 TOPIC ID: 015/DEVS 864 (Seminar) - Winter

Instructor:    Scott Rutherford

Course Title:  Inequity and Development in North America

This course explores power and inequality in North America by conversing with the theories and histories of global development and decolonization. We will explore a wide range of topics, including the legacies of settler-colonialism and slavery in contemporary society, how International Development institutions and actors have shaped popular knowledge about poverty in the Global North, and why since the 1960s some community organizers have turned to theories emerging from the Global South to change conditions of inequality that exist in the First World.

PREREQUISITES Level 4 and registration in the DEVS Major or Medial Plan, or permission of the Department.

NOTE Taught concurrently with DEVS 864/3.0.

EXCLUSION No more than 3.0 units from DEVS 492 TOPIC ID 015/3.0; DEVS 864/3.0.

Return to top

DEVS 480/6.0 - Summer 2016 - NOT offered in Summer 2017

Instructor:    Robert Lovelace

Course Title:  Re-indigenizing People and Environments

Six hundred years of colonial economics and resettlement have dominated this planet’s people and environments. Only in the last 100 years has there been a serious rethinking of the fundamental philosophies and institutions that are responsible for the greatest societal and ecological mutations our species has ever experienced. While intellectual work has made important theoretical and technological advances, there is a great divide between those who possess – and live according to – sustainable ecological knowledge, and those who are at best able to postulate dubious remedial actions. There is a great need to bridge this gap. Complementary lifeways, which balance cognitive, emotional and physical realities can inform intellectual, scientific, and artistic enquiry. In this course we attempt to strike that balance, through academic inquiry and visceral practical experience, in the classroom and on the land.

EXCLUSION No more than 3.0 units from DEVS 392 TOPIC ID 004; DEVS 48

Return to top

DEVS 501/6.0 Honours Thesis in Development Studies

The course will involve a critical review of the literature on a clearly-defined topic relevant to development, a synthesis of ideas, and a final thesis under the supervision of a faculty member.

NOTE The student must identify a willing supervisor from DEVS or a cognate department and receive permission of the Department of Global Development Studies.

PREREQUISITES Minimum Cumulative GPA of 3.50 and Level 4 and registration in the DEVS Major or Medial Plan.

EXCLUSION DEVS 450/3.0.

501 Approval form (updated 4May2016 - PDF 7KB)

501 Course outline (updated 4May2016 - PDF 28 KB)

Return to top

DEVS 502/3.0 Directed Readings in Development Studies

This course enables a student or a group of students to explore a body of literature on a selected topic in development. The focus may be by theme, by region or by academic approach and can span the humanities, social sciences and environmental sciences. NOTE The students are responsible for approaching a professor with whom they wish to work and who is willing to undertake this project.

PREREQUISITES Minimum Cumulative GPA of 3.50 and Level 4 and registration in the DEVS Major or Medial Plan.

502 Approval form (updated 4May2016 - PDF 7KB)

502 Course outline (updated 4May2016 - PDF 21KB)

Return to top