Trauma Response Services

The Trauma Response Services offered through Shepell·fgi may be utilized for situations that occur at Queen’s University.   If you are aware of a situation where this service could be of benefit, please contact:

Lorna Baxter, Human Resources, 533-6000 extension 77794, baxterl@post.queensu.ca

People who are unexpectedly plunged into a dangerous or stressful situation often experience psychological trauma.  While psychological trauma is not as visible as the bodily injury of physical trauma, it can cause deep, persistent wounds to the psyche and emotions. 

Traumatic experiences may include:

Though shock is a well-known physical sign of psychological trauma, victims may also experience severe imbalances of despair, confusion, depression and fear.

WHAT’S THE CONNECTION TO TRAUMA RESPONSE SERVICES?

The Trauma Response Service aims to restore emotional equilibrium and help victims resume fully functioning lives after a traumatic event through a process called a Trauma Debriefing.  During the trauma debriefing, victims can discuss their feelings and receive specialized counseling.

Shepell·fgi takes great pride in its ability to respond quickly, effectively and compassionately.  Their trained and experienced professionals are able to make a positive impact within hours. 

THE TRAUMATIC EXPERIENCE

An unexpected, senseless and possibly violent event has just occurred affecting you, the victim and your co-workers.   This single incident can take away your senses of security and well-being.  It will certainly, for a short time, impair your ability to function normally.

COMMON REACTIONS

Physical:

  • Headaches
  • Lack of energy
  • Heart palpitations
  • Chest pains
  • Neck or back pain
  • Change in appetite
  • Dizzy spells
  • Insomnia / Nightmares
  • Shaky feeling
  • Restlessness

Emotional

  • Irritability
  • Anger / Rage
  • Flashbacks
  • Heightened level of suspicion
  • Easily startled
  • Denial
  • Loss of interest in sex
  • Losing trust in those you’ve trusted
  • Anxiety / Helplessness
  • Inability to concentrate
  • Lack of interest in intimacy
  • Overprotection of children

Changes at Work

  • Daydreaming
  • Distraction
  • Forgetfulness
  • Making small errors
  • Repetition of work tasks already done
  • Decrease in quality of work
  • Reluctance to go back to work
  • Tendency to over-work
  • Missing points or details mentioned in discussions/meetings

THINGS YOU CAN DO

One or more of the following tips may help you get through the period following the traumatic event.

SUPPORT THE FAMILY CAN GIVE

SUPPORT A CO-WORKER CAN GIVE

 




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