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Ethnicity and Democratic Governance

Ejobowah.jpgJohn Boye Ejobowah

Associate Professor
Department of Global Studies
Wilfrid Laurier University

E-mail

Research Statement (66 kb)

John Ejobowah is associate professor in the Global Studies Program at Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo, Ontario. He was trained at the University of Port-Harcourt (B. Sc. Political Science, 1986, and M. Sc. Political Science, 1989) in his home country Nigeria, and at the University of Toronto (Ph.D. Political Science, 1999).

He previously taught political science at the University of Port Harcourt (1990-1992), and served as an adjunct professor of political science at the University of Toronto (1999-2003). He has been at Wilfrid Laurier University since July 2003.

Ejobowah's work makes normative evaluation of group claims to equality and of institutional arrangements for responding to such claims. His research also focuses on alternative federal institutions for equal accommodation of groups (with special emphasis on Nigeria). He is the author of Competing Claims to Recognition in the Nigerian Public Sphere: A Liberal Argument about Justice in Plural Societies (2001), and of several journal articles and book chapters, the most recent being: “Territorial Pluralism: Assessing the Ethnofederal Variant in Nigeria” Regional and Federal Studies, 20 (2), 2010: 249-272; “Rewriting Nigerian Federal Constitution: A Prescriptive Argument for a Self-Sustaining Arrangement” Canadian Journal of African Studies, 43 (3), 2009: 507-535; Integrationist and Accommodationist Measures in Nigeria's Constitutional Engineering: Successes and Failures, in Constitutional Design for Divided Societies: Integration or Accommodation?, edited by Sujit Choudhry, Oxford: Oxford University Press (2008).

Ejobowah lives in Mississauga within the greater Toronto area, with his wife Joyce Boma Ejobowah. He has three children.

Expertise:

  • Normative evaluation of group claims to equality
  • Institutional arrangements for responding to group claims for equality
  • Alternative federal institutions for equal accommodation of groups (with special emphasis on Nigeria)
  • State failure in Nigeria

Kingston, Ontario, Canada. K7L 3N6. 613.533.2000