Undergraduate Course Offerings

Prerequisites

Click here to view the prerequisites for ENGL courses.

200-Level Courses

The prerequisite for all 200-level ENGL courses is a minimum grade of C in ENGL 100/6.0.

Note for students enrolling in an English Plan: Prospective Majors, Medials, and Minors require a minimum grade of B- in ENGL100/6.0 to be automatically accepted into the English Plan. Students with a C+ in ENGL100/6.0 may be placed on the “pending” list, and may be accepted into the English Plan if space is available. Certain Medial plans do not have automatic acceptance, but the same grade thresholds generally apply.

ENGL 200/6.0: Enrolment preference is given to English Majors, Medials, and Minors.

ENGL 290/3.0: The prerequisite is ENGL 100/6.0 and registration in an English Plan as a Major or Medial.

Note that courses at the 200 level have limited enrolments. Students registered in an English Plan applying to take these courses have priority over those applying to take them as Electives.

300- And 400-Level Courses

To take 300- and 400-level English courses, one must:

  • be enrolled in an ENGL BAH program (Medial or Major),
  • have successfully completed ENGL 200/6.0 and ENGL 290/3.0, and
  • have obtained a minimum GPA of 2.4 in all previous ENGL units.
  • Minors with a minimum grade of B+ in at least 18.0 previous ENGL units may take 6.0 units at the 300 level, if space permits.

Note that courses at the 300- and 400-levels have limited enrolments. Students registered in an English Plan applying to take these courses as Core courses have priority over those applying to take them as Option courses.

ENGL 590/3.0 Senior Essay Option

Permission of the Department and a minimum GPA of 3.5 in 24.0 previous ENGL units. The 3.5 GPA requirement may be waived in exceptional cases by request of the essay’s faculty supervisor.

Course Booklet

The 2014–2015 undergraduate course listing is also available as a PDF booklet.

Fall-Winter Terms, 2014–2015

This is a preliminary listing: details will be added as they become available.

  • 100 Level
All 100-level ENGL courses are full-year courses, offered in Fall and Winter Terms 2014–2015. You must enrol in the same section in both terms, and in the case of ENGL 100, the same tutorial, in both terms; it is not possible to switch sections or tutorials at the beginning of the Winter Term.
CourseInstructor
ENGL 100/6.0 Introduction to Literary StudyJohn Pierce (ENGL 100 001)
John Pierce/Marta Straznicky (ENGL 100 002)
ENGL 100 700/6.0 Introduction to Literary Study (online course)Robert Morrison
ENGL 160/6.0 Modern Prose FictionRobert May
  • 200 Level
Half Courses
CourseTermInstructor
Fall Term 2014
ENGL 223/3.0 Selected Women Writers II (online course)Fall 2014Asha Varadharajan
ENGL 234/3.0 The Short Story in EnglishFall 2014Shannon Minifie
ENGL 237 001/3.0 Children’s LiteratureFall 2014Amber Hastings
ENGL 257/3.0 Elizabethan ShakespeareFall 2014Erin Weinberg
ENGL 277/3.0 Literature and GenderFall 2014Mikaela Withers
Winter Term 2015
ENGL 237 002/3.0 Children’s LiteratureWinter 2015Melissa Li Sheung Ying
ENGL 237 700/3.0 Children’s Literature (online course)Winter 2015Heather Evans
ENGL 259/3.0 Global Shakespeare (online course)Winter 2015Marta Straznicky
ENGL 271/3.0 Issues and Themes: Special Topics I—Bad English: Language and Postcolonial Literature new offeringWinter 2015Kris Singh
ENGL 278/3.0 Literature and Place—Haunted Ground: The Gothic EnvironmentWinter 2015Steve Asselin
ENGL 293/3.0 Introductory Approaches to Cultural StudiesWinter 2015Chris Bongie
Full-Year Courses
CourseInstructor
ENGL 200 001/6.0 The History of Literature in EnglishRuth Wehlau
ENGL 200 002/6.0 The History of Literature in EnglishGwynn Dujardin
ENGL 215/6.0 Canadian LiteratureHeather Macfarlane
ENGL 217/6.0 Postcolonial Literature CancelledHolly McIndoe / Kris Singh
ENGL 292/6.0 Introduction to Literary Criticism and TheoryMaggie Berg
ENGL 290 ENGL 290 is a required course for ENGL Majors and Medials; it is not available to ENGL Minors or students not following ENGL plans. ENGL 290 is a half course: you must select one section from either the Fall or Winter term. You may not enrol in more than one section.
CourseTermInstructor
Fall Term 2014
ENGL 290 001001/3.0 Seminar in Literary Interpretation: Henry James’s Portrait of a LadyFall 2014S. Brooke Cameron
ENGL 290 002002/3.0 Seminar in Literary Interpretation: The Poetry of Elizabeth BishopFall 2014Yaël Schlick
ENGL 290 003003/3.0 Seminar in Literary Interpretation: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and Slave NarrativesFall 2014Laura Murray
Winter Term 2014
ENGL 290 001004/3.0 Seminar in Literary Interpretation: Herman Melville’s Moby-DickWinter 2015Glenn Willmott
ENGL 290 002005/3.0 Seminar in Literary Interpretation: Charles Dickens’s Bleak HouseWinter 2015Carla Manfredi
ENGL 290 003006/3.0 Seminar in Literary Interpretation: Reading Michael OndaatjeWinter 2015Heather Macfarlane
  • 400 Level and Above
Half Courses Courses in bold type are repeatable. You may take these courses more than once provided that the topics are different, and all versions that you take will count toward your program and toward your GPA. The same is not true of non-repeatable courses (which do not appear in bold type on this page): only one version of non-repeatable courses may count toward your program and GPA. If you have any questions about which courses are repeatable, or about how repeatable courses work, contact the Undergraduate Chair.
CourseTermInstructor
Fall Term 2014
ENGL 421001/3.0 Topics in Renaissance Literature I
Topic: The Classical and the Popular in Renaissance Drama
Fall 2014Elizabeth Hanson
ENGL 441001/3.0 Topics in Romanticism I
Topic: Poetry and Poetics of Wordsworth
Fall 2014Mark Jones
ENGL 446001/3.0 Topics in Literature of the Americas I
Topic: Literary New York City in the Gilded Age
Fall 2014S. Brooke Cameron
ENGL 451001/3.0 Topics in Victorian Literature I
Topic: At Table with the Victorians: Gastronomy, Cookery Books, and Food in Nineteenth-Century Literature
Fall 2014Heather Evans
ENGL 461001/3.0 Topics in Modern/Contemporary British Literature I
Topic: War Literature Between the Wars
Fall 2014Patricia Rae
ENGL 466 001001/3.0 Topics in Modern/Contemporary Canadian Literature I
Topic: Canadian Poetry: Modernism and After
Fall 2014Tracy Ware
ENGL 466 002002/3.0 Topics in Modern/Contemporary Canadian Literature I
Topic: Gay Voices in Canada
Fall 2014Robert May
ENGL 481 001001/3.0 Topics in Indigenous Literatures I
Topic: Introduction to Indigenous Literatures in Canada
Fall 2014Heather Macfarlane
ENGL 481 002002/3.0 Topics in Indigenous Literatures I
Topic: Aboriginal and Chinese Canadian Connections in Contemporary Literature in Canada
Fall 2014Petra Fachinger
ENGL 486001/3.0 Group III: Special Topics I
Topic: Antarctica and the Imagination
Fall 2014Yaël Schlick
ENGL 496001/3.0 Topics in Literary Criticism and Theory I
Topic: Reading Subjectivity
Fall 2014Maggie Berg
Winter Term 2015
ENGL 421002/3.0 Topics in Renaissance Literature I
Topic: Shakespeare and Early Modern Print Culture
Winter 2015Marta Straznicky
ENGL 436001/3.0 Group I: Special Topics I
Topic: Medieval and Tudor Drama
Winter 2015Ruth Wehlau
ENGL 441002/3.0 Topics in Romanticism I
Topic: Poetry and Poetics of John Keats
Winter 2015Mark Jones
ENGL 451002/3.0 Topics in Victorian Literature I
Topic: Slumming in the 19th Century
Winter 2015S. Brooke Cameron
ENGL 456001/3.0 Group II: Special Topics I
Topic: Drugs, Death, and Detectives: Thomas De Quincey and the Literature of Addiction
Winter 2015Robert Morrison
ENGL 466 001003/3.0 Topics in Modern/Contemporary Canadian Literature I
Topic: Canadian Short Story Collections
Winter 2015Tracy Ware
ENGL 466 002004/3.0 Topics in Modern/Contemporary Canadian Literature I
Topic: Diasporic and Transnational Perspectives in Contemporary Canadian Fiction
Winter 2015Petra Fachinger
ENGL 476001/3.0 Topics in Postcolonial Literatures I
Topic: Terra Australis: An Introduction to Australian Literature and Culture
Winter 2015Asha Varadharajan
ENGL 481003/3.0 Topics in Indigenous Literatures I
Topic: The Role of Writing
Winter 2015Armand Ruffo
ENGL 486 001002/3.0 Group III: Special Topics I
Topic: T. S. Eliot and Virginia Woolf
Winter 2015Gabrielle McIntire
ENGL 486 002003/3.0 Group III: Special Topics I
Topic: The Graphic Novel: Visualizing History and Bearing Witness to Trauma
Winter 2015Heather Evans
ENGL 590/3.0 Senior Essay OptionWinter 2015Various
  • Creative Writing
These courses can be counted toward English Plans. Admission is by permission of the instructor: students hoping to take these courses must submit a portfolio of work to the instructor by 1 June 2012. For full information about enrolling in these courses, consult the Creative Writing page.
CourseTermInstructor
CWRI 293/3.0 Creative Writing in ProseFall 2014Carolyn Smart
CWRI 295/3.0 Creative Writing IFall 2014Carolyn Smart
CWRI 294/3.0 Creative Writing in PoetryWinter 2015Armand Ruffo
CWRI 295 700/3.0 Creative Writing I (online course)Winter 2015Carolyn Smart
CWRI 296/3.0 Creative Writing IIWinter 2015Carolyn Smart

ENGL 100 (Summer)/6.0 Introduction to Literary Study

Online course

Instructors: Christopher Fanning
Offered: Summer
Units: 6.0

Description: This class introduces you to the four main literary genres: fiction, poetry, drama, and the essay. It is also designed to improve your writing skills, and to develop your knowledge of literary terms and critical techniques as a foundation for further literary study. Why study literary genre? “We need poems and stories and novels and plays, as well as essays,” replies the great American writer Scott Russell Sanders. “Each genre offers us paths through the dark woods of this life, and we need all the paths we can find.”

Upon successful completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

  1. Identify and explain the hallmarks of the four main literary genres.
  2. Identify, analyse, and employ the language of literary analysis when discussing texts (this language includes terms such as metaphor, irony, pathos, parody, rhetoric, and ideology).
  3. Demonstrate a basic understanding of key critical theories (such as psychoanalysis, Marxism, feminism, and queer theory).
  4. Evaluate the importance of gender, class, race, and geographical location such as categories for literary analysis.
  5. Show a sound knowledge of grammar, punctuation, diction, and syntax.
  6. Compose original arguments that evaluate, analyse, and synthesize primary and secondary texts, and that do so within a structural framework that includes a thesis statement, strong topic sentences, textual evidence, and a compelling conclusion.

Note: This course is not open to first year on-campus students.

Exclusion: No more than 6.0 units from: ENGL 100/6.0, ENGL 110/6.0, ENGL 112/6.0, ENGL 160/6.0.

ENGL 100 700/6.0 Introduction to Literary Study

Online course

Instructor: Robert Morrison
Offered: Fall and Winter Terms
Units: 6.0

Description: This class introduces you to the four main literary genres: fiction, poetry, drama, and the essay. It is also designed to improve your writing skills, and to develop your knowledge of literary terms and critical techniques as a foundation for further literary study. Why study literary genre? “We need poems and stories and novels and plays, as well as essays,” replies the great American writer Scott Russell Sanders. “Each genre offers us paths through the dark woods of this life, and we need all the paths we can find.”

Upon successful completion of this course, you should be able to do the following:

  1. Identify and explain the hallmarks of the four main literary genres.
  2. Identify, analyse, and employ the language of literary analysis when discussing texts (this language includes terms such as metaphor, irony, pathos, parody, rhetoric, and ideology).
  3. Demonstrate a basic understanding of key critical theories (such as psychoanalysis, Marxism, feminism, and queer theory).
  4. Evaluate the importance of gender, class, race, and geographical location such as categories for literary analysis.
  5. Show a sound knowledge of grammar, punctuation, diction, and syntax.
  6. Compose original arguments that evaluate, analyse, and synthesize primary and secondary texts, and that do so within a structural framework that includes a thesis statement, strong topic sentences, textual evidence, and a compelling conclusion.

Note: This course is not open to first year on-campus students.

Exclusion: No more than 6.0 units from: ENGL 100/6.0, ENGL 110/6.0, ENGL 112/6.0, ENGL 160/6.0.

ENGL 100/6.0 Introduction to Literary Study

Instructors: John Pierce (ENGL 100 001), John Pierce/Marta Straznicky (ENGL 100 002)
Offered: Fall and Winter Terms
Units: 6.0

Description:

From the Arts & Science Calendar: An introduction to literary study, with an emphasis on the formal analysis of a diverse range of poetry and prose. Specific content and approach vary from section to section, but all sections share the goals of developing sensitivity to genre, cultivating writing skills, and providing students with a set of literary terms and critical techniques as a foundation for further literary study.

Note: Enrolment preference is given to first-year students.

Exclusion: No more than 6.0 units from: ENGL 100/6.0, ENGL 110/6.0, ENGL 112/6.0, ENGL 160/6.0.

ENGL 160/6.0 Modern Prose Fiction

Instructor: Robert May
Offered: Fall and Winter Terms
Units: 6.0

Description: This course is designed to promote interest in and appreciation for modern and contemporary prose fiction by introducing students to a selection of the most influential short stories and novels of the twentieth century. The course will provide students with a vocabulary for reading and discussing twentieth-century works of prose, and it will explore some of the most important themes, ideas, and preoccupations in modern and contemporary prose fiction. American, British, Canadian, and world authors will be represented.

Requirements: Evaluation methods will include written assignments, class attendance and participation, periodic quizzes, and a final exam.

Note: Enrolment is limited to students not registered in an ENGL Plan, and preference is given to upper-year students. This course may not be used as a foundation for an ENGL Plan or a prerequisite for upper-year ENGL courses.

Exclusion: No more than 6.0 units from: ENGL 100/6.0, ENGL 110/6.0, ENGL 112/6.0, ENGL 160/6.0.

ENGL 200 001/6.0 History of Literature in English

Instructor: Ruth Wehlau
Offered: Fall and Winter Terms
Units: 6.0

Description: This course will provide an overview of the predominantly British and Anglo-Irish literary tradition from the Anglo-Saxon period up to and including contemporary literature in English from around the world. The aim of the course is to introduce students to the major works and literary movements of this tradition within their historical context, to consider the reception of these works, and to examine the changes in the understanding of literature and its place in the world that occur throughout more than a thousand years of writing in English. To this end we will investigate a variety of issues: orality vs. literacy, the rise of the novel, the Romantic movement, and post-colonialism, among others. Works to be read include prose, poetry and drama by writers such as Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Austen and Wordsworth.

Requirements: Essays, in-class quizzes, exam.

Note: ENGL 200 is required for English Majors, Medials, and Minors in their 2nd year before advancing to 3rd year. Enrolment preference is therefore given to English Majors, Medials, and Minors.

Exclusion: No more than 6.0 units from ENGL 110/6.0, ENGL 200/6.0.

ENGL 200 002/6.0 History of Literature in English

Instructor: Gwynn Dujardin
Offered: Fall and Winter Terms
Units: 6.0

Description: This survey course introduces students to the history of literature in the English language, from early writings from the Anglo-Saxon period to contemporary works from around the English-speaking world. Organized around canonical works representative of periods in literary history (e.g., medieval, Victorian, contemporary), the course traces developments in the definition of English as a literary language, the status and role of the writer in society, and the ways literature circulates in oral, material, and digital forms.

Note: ENGL 200 is required for English Majors, Medials, and Minors in their 2nd year before advancing to 3rd year. Enrolment preference is therefore given to English Majors, Medials, and Minors.

Exclusion: No more than 6.0 units from ENGL 110/6.0, ENGL 200/6.0.

ENGL 215/6.0 Canadian Literature

Instructor: Heather Macfarlane
Offered: Fall and Winter Terms
Units: 6.0

Description: Canada is home to a long and rich variety of literary traditions, making it impossible to speak of one Canadian literature. In order to determine what Canadian Literatures are, and how they influence our perception of Canada, we will examine both the similarities and differences between various communities’ literatures, as well as the contexts in which they were written. Starting with examples of traditional Indigenous literatures, we will look at novels, short stories, plays, poetry, songs and films from many communities, regions and historical periods with the goal of demonstrating the impact of literature on our understanding of diverse and shared experiences.

Texts may include Vol. 1 of Canadian Literature in English; Execution Poems, by George Elliott Clarke; Rez Sisters, by Tomson Highway; Disappearing Moon Cafe, by Sky Lee; Lives of Girls and Women, by Alice Munro; Running in the Family, by Michael Ondaatje; As For Me and My House, by Sinclair Ross; Les Belles Soeurs, by Michel Tremblay; The Lesser Blessed, by Richard Van Camp; and The Swamp Angel, by Ethel Wilson.

Requirements (subject to change): A test, 2 essays, an exam, short reading responses, participation/attendance.

ENGL 217/6.0 Postcolonial Literature

Instructor: Holly McIndoe / Kris Singh
Offered: Fall and Winter Terms
Units: 6.0

Description: This course has been cancelled.

ENGL 223 (Summer)/3.0 Selected Women Writers II

Online course

Instructor: Asha Varadharajan
Offered: Summer
Units: 3.0

Description: In A Room of One’s Own (1929), Virginia Woolf wonders, “who shall measure the heat and violence of the poet’s heart when caught and tangled in a woman’s body?” This course introduces you to fiction, poetry, and drama by twentieth-century and twenty-first century women writers who have sought both to “measure” and to heal the division between poet’s heart and woman’s body that Woolf so eloquently describes.

First, we will concern ourselves with the global diversity of feminine Anglophone literary traditions across categories of genre, race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, and geography. Second, we will explore how women writers adapt and alter masculine literary influences to both scandalous and sobering effect. Finally, we will consider how literature by women offers a unique and often dissident perspective on the radical social, economic, psychological, scientific and technological, and cultural transformations of the modern and contemporary world. Throughout the dissemination of this course, pertinent reference will be made to aural, oral, visual and digital cultural production by women as well as to significant moments of collective struggle.

Requirements: Discussion Forum, 15%; assignment 1 (750–1000 words), 15%; assignment 2 (1000–1500 words), 30%; optional assignment (bonus grade), 5%; final exam, 40%.

Note: Students registered in a Gender Studies Plan may take this course without the usual prerequisite of ENGL 100.

ENGL 223/3.0 Selected Women Writers II

Online course

Instructor: Asha Varadharajan
Offered: Fall Term
Units: 3.0

Description: In A Room of One’s Own (1929), Virginia Woolf wonders, “who shall measure the heat and violence of the poet’s heart when caught and tangled in a woman’s body?” This course introduces you to fiction, poetry, and drama by twentieth-century and twenty-first century women writers who have sought both to “measure” and to heal the division between poet’s heart and woman’s body that Woolf so eloquently describes.

First, we will concern ourselves with the global diversity of feminine Anglophone literary traditions across categories of genre, race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, and geography. Second, we will explore how women writers adapt and alter masculine literary influences to both scandalous and sobering effect. Finally, we will consider how literature by women offers a unique and often dissident perspective on the radical social, economic, psychological, scientific and technological, and cultural transformations of the modern and contemporary world. Throughout the dissemination of this course, pertinent reference will be made to aural, oral, visual and digital cultural production by women as well as to significant moments of collective struggle.

Requirements: Discussion Forum, 15%; assignment 1 (750–1000 words), 15%; assignment 2 (1000–1500 words), 30%; optional assignment (bonus grade), 5%; final exam, 40%.

Note: Students registered in a Gender Studies Plan may take this course without the usual prerequisite of ENGL 100.

ENGL 234/3.0 The Short Story in English

The Contemporary American Short Story

Instructor: Shannon Minifie
Offered: Fall Term
Units: 3.0

Description: This course traces the formal and thematic developments of the American short story in the period after 1945, focusing on the contexts from which contemporary authors of the short story emerge. Such contexts will include the popularity of the “creative writing workshop” (or MFA program), as well as changing publishing conditions (such as the rise of the university-sponsored journal and the popularity of magazines such as The New Yorker). Students will also examine innovations in the short story form during this period (including a consideration of the legacy of what John N. Duvall has called the “institutionalization” of minimalism, that “unacknowledged hegemony of creative writing programs”); subsequent battles between “Realism” and postmodern metafiction, as well as other questions of genre and style; and the short story’s engagement with history (including World War II, the Cold War years and its various political upheavals, and the events of 9/11). Students will also consider the important challenge, by emerging American Indian, Asian, Latino/a, Indigenous, and African American, among other “ethnic” and/or minority writers, to the canon of short fiction previously crowded with white male authors. Overall, consideration of the selected literary and (occasionally) theoretical or sociological texts will serve as the basis for discussions about changes in the formal and thematic characteristics of the short story in the contemporary United States, as well as the ways in which literary (and popular) culture register and/or refashion contemporary reading practices.

Authors may include J. D. Salinger, Flannery O’Connor, Philip Roth, Raymond Carver, Joyce Carol Oates, John Updike, Robert Coover, Alice Walker, Donald Barthelme, James Baldwin, Tim O’Brien, David Foster Wallace, A. M. Homes, George Saunders, Louise Erdrich, Leslie Marmon Silko, Philip K. Dick, John Barth, Cynthia Ozik, Sherman Alexie, Jhumpa Lahiri, Lydia Davis.

Requirements: A shorter essay (20%), a longer essay (30%), occasional quizzes and other in-class assignments (25%), and a final exam (25%).

ENGL 237 001/3.0 Children’s Literature

Instructor: Amber Hastings
Offered: Fall Term
Units: 3.0

Description: This course takes as its focus the history of children’s literature in Britain from the Middle Ages to the early twentieth century, with an emphasis on nineteenth-century works for children. The first part of this course will focus on texts included in the anthology From Instruction to Delight and will move through a selection of fairy tales from the early nineteenth century to bring us to the Golden Age of children’s literature in the mid-nineteenth century. As we move through this historical survey of literature for children we will challenge stereotypes and assumptions that children’s literature must be educational, conservative and moralizing. We will question the ways that literature for children reinforce or challenge ideological and cultural assumptions about childhood. We will explore the ways that children’s literature engages with a dual audience of adult and child readers as it intersects with a wide range of issues including, but not limited to, gender, race, technology, politics, religion, economics, fantasy and the imagination.

Requirements: In-class response papers (15%), close reading assignment (20%), essay (30%), and a final exam (35%).

ENGL 237 002/3.0 Children’s Literature

Children’s Literature and the Environmental Imagination

Instructor: Melissa Li Sheung Ying
Offered: Winter Term
Units: 3.0

Description: This course will introduce students to the history of children’s literature from its beginnings as a genre through to its current interdisciplinary form in the twenty-first century. Our discussion of recent works for children and young adults will be built on a survey of the historical development of a literature specifically shaped for young readers. Central to our study will be the questions of what distinguishes children’s literature from other genres and how the construction and nature of childhood is challenged historically and socio-politically across the centuries.

As we move towards more recent texts and narratives for young readers, we will consider how children’s literature continues to cultivate, engage, and promote an awareness of the world around it. By considering the relationship between the child and his or her landscape, both real and imagined, we will explore the connections linking children’s texts and children’s environmental experiences and how these may challenge, renew, and/or reflect our current concerns about the environment.

Requirements: In-class response papers (15%), close reading assignment (20%), essay (30%), and a final exam (35%).

ENGL 237 700/3.0 Children’s Literature

Online course

Instructor: Heather Evans
Offered: Winter Term
Units: 3.0

Description: This course takes as its focus the history of children’s literature in Britain from the Middle Ages to the twentieth century, with an emphasis on nineteenth-century works for children. The first half of the course concentrates largely on texts included in the anthology, From Instruction to Delight and on John Bunyan’s The Pilgrim’s Progress, and is designed to survey the development of a literature shaped specifically for children from its beginnings to the golden age of the nursery in the mid-nineteenth century. The last half of the course will explore one dominant genre in children’s literature of the twentieth century—fantasy—and will include works by writers such as George MacDonald, Oscar Wilde, J. M. Barrie, Beatrix Potter, Russell Hoban, Roald Dahl, Philip Pullman, and J. R. R. Tolkien. Central to our study will be an examination of the construction of childhood across the centuries; consideration of the intersections and relationships between literature, politics, philosophy, commerce, religion, economics, art, and other cultural sites; and an investigation of the dynamic between literature written for adult audiences and books read by children. As we work through our course we will interrogate hackneyed clichés and popular assumptions such as that the primary function of books read by children (past or present) is to stimulate the imagination of the child; or that children’s literature is simplistic, conservative, or moral; or that children are naturally sweet, innocent little angels.

Requirements: Two short essays (15% and 25%), active participation in online discussions (10%), and a final exam (50%).

ENGL 259/3.0 Global Shakespeare

Online course

Instructor: Marta Straznicky
Offered: Fall and Winter Terms
Units: 6.0

Description: A study of the dissemination of Shakespeare’s plays across a range of cultures and sites from the early seventeenth century to the present, with a focus on the development of Shakespeare as a “global” author. Selected plays will be studied in historical context and in geographically diverse adaptations in theatrical, print, and electronic media.

ENGL 257/3.0 Elizabethan Shakespeare

Instructor: Erin Weinberg
Offered: Fall Term
Units: 3.0

Description: Early modern playwright Ben Jonson called Shakespeare’s works, “Not of an age, but for all time.” These words ring true today because, even 400 years later, we can identify with the ideas he shares about love, hatred, revenge, family, monarchy, power, gender and more. Yet, despite the plays’ contemporary resonances, Shakespeare’s works are very much a product of their time. The plays we will study are Romeo and Juliet, The Merchant of Venice, Titus Andronicus, 1 Henry IV, Twelfth Night, and Hamlet. We will explore these plays first through the practice of close reading, and will then reflect on how Shakespeare's words come alive and shift in meaning through the medium of performance. We will reflect on the staging of Shakespeare’s plays in Elizabethan outdoor playhouses, and consider the ways in which adapting Shakespeare has evolved over the centuries, culminating in film adaptations of Shakespeare’s works today. How are Shakespeare’s plays “of an age”, and in what ways are these works “for all time”?

Requirements: Pop quizzes (top 5 of 6 count towards final grade), 15%; close reading assignment, 20%; essay, 30%; 2-hour exam, 35%.

ENGL 277/3.0 Literature and Gender

Victorian Sexology

Instructor: Mikaela Withers
Offered: Fall Term
Units: 3.0

Description: The word “Victorian” has in today’s vernacular become nearly synonymous with modesty, prudishness, and rigid sexual codes. Despite Queen Victoria’s prolific brood of children and life-long romantic obsession with her husband, her image has represented, and continues to represent, matronly domesticity and a disciplined unsexiness. Despite these lasting associations, the latter part of the nineteenth century saw an almost obsessive desire to understand, pathologize and categorize various aspects of sex and gender, as fears and anxiety about prostitution, promiscuity, womanly men and manly women began to pervade the cultural atmosphere.

This course aims to explore how textual narratives by turns responded to, reinforced or subverted expectations around sex and gender. We will look at figures as varied as the “Angel in the House,” the fallen woman, the dandy and the New Woman, as well as explore issues of sexual violence, prostitution, cross-dressing and gender-bending. Ultimately, our goal will be to consider the ways in which Victorian literature wrote and responded to issues of sex and gender, and how these obsessions and anxieties helped to create new categories of sexuality (i.e., the homosexual) and even new ways of being in one’s gender. While exploring the various natures of femininity and masculinity, heterosexuality and homosexuality, we will seek to consider how issues of sex and gender intersect with questions of race, eugenics, degeneracy and the expansion of the British Empire.

Requirements: Participation, a close reading assignment, a term paper and a final exam.

ENGL 271/3.0 Issues and Themes: Special Topics I

Bad English: Language and Postcolonial Literature

Instructor: Kris Singh
Offered: Winter Term
Units: 3.0

Description: This course will introduce students to the literatures of those who were once the subjects of Empire. We will study contemporary writing that considers what the aftermath and continuation of this imperial history means for us all in our postcolonial, increasingly globalized world. Our particular focus will be the oppressive and resistive powers of language. We will be attentive to the power of language as an instrument of empire. At the same time, we will consider how language is distorted, employed, or adapted by those resisting dominating forces. The question of home and being at home in one’s language will be central to our investigation. In order to pursue these lines of thought, students will read texts from the Caribbean, Africa, Canada, and Britain, and from in-between places with a neither/both perspective on home and nation. We will read novels, short stories, poetry, and drama, but we will also pay due attention to oral traditions such as dub poetry. Texts to be studied may include Samuel Selvon’s The Lonely Londoners, Ken Saro-Wiwa’s Sozaboy, Junot Díaz’s The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, Gautam Malkani’s Londonstani, Earl Lovelace’s The Dragon Can’t Dance, and shorter selections from the works of Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Edwidge Danticat, Derek Walcott, Louise Bennett, Edward Kamau Brathwaite, Bessie Head, and Chinua Achebe.

Requirements: Participation: 15%; mid-term essay: 20%; final essay: 30%; final exam: 35%.

ENGL 278/3.0 Literature and Place

Haunted Ground: The Gothic Environment

Instructor: Steve Asselin
Offered: Winter Term
Units: 3.0

Description: This course aims to put the “nature” back in “supernatural” by examining the role of the environment in Gothic fiction of the last two centuries. From the ancient, isolated castle of Otranto to the zombie-strewn ruins of The Walking Dead, it has often been suggested that the setting in Gothic fiction is a character unto itself; these locations, foreign or familiar, are replete with barely-contained secrets to threaten the protagonists of these stories. At the same time, the human body itself becomes the site of Gothic haunting, as the repressed tendencies of body and mind claw their way to the surface. This course will introduce students to the theoretical background of the Gothic and the literary study of the environment. We will discover how Gothic settings are gendered, racialized, alienated by technology, and otherwise transformed into strangely “Other” spaces. Authors examined may include Horace Walpole, Samuel Coleridge, Mary Shelley, Edgar Allan Poe, Bram Stoker, H. P. Lovecraft, William Faulkner, Stephen King, Doris Lessing, Tim Burton, and Robert Kirkman.

Requirements: Short in-class quizzes, a brief written assignment mid-way through the semester, a longer essay, and a final exam.

ENGL 290 001001/3.0 Seminar in Literary Interpretation

Henry James’s Portrait of a Lady

Instructor: S. Brooke Cameron
Offered: Fall Term
Units: 3.0

Description: This seminar course will focus on Henry James’s masterpiece The Portrait of a Lady (1881), which the author himself described as a tragic story about a “poor girl” who “dream[s] of freedom and nobleness” but “finds herself in reality ground in the very mill of the conventional.” Class discussions and writing assignments will help students develop skills of close reading and critical interpretation. Additional course readings will include biographical and secondary material on both the author and novel.

Requirements: A sourced essay, four in-class response papers, a group presentation, pop quizzes, regular participation, and a final exam.

Note: Available only to English Majors and Medials, for whom it is a required course.

ENGL 290 002002/3.0 Seminar in Literary Interpretation

The Poetry of Elizabeth Bishop

Instructor: Yaël Schlick
Offered: Fall Term
Units: 3.0

Description: Though our focus will be on Elizabeth Bishop’s poems, and though we will devote the majority of our time to a close reading of them, we will also use Bishop as a means of entering into discussions about gender and travel, about the nature of the self and of the animal world. (In an interview she once said, “I think geography comes first in my work, and then animals. But I like people, too.”) We’ll explore her depiction of specific places (Key West, Brazil, Nova Scotia), situate her in the world of 1950s and 60s America when the confessional lyric began to dominate the poetry scene, and explore how our own contemporary moment appraises and treats her writings. In short, Elizabeth Bishop will be our entry point to gaining close reading skills, exploring issues central to our own concerns today, and understanding the multiple interpretive possibilities that a writer’s works offer readers.

Requirements: Course work will include short essays, in-class graded writing assignments, a seminar presentation, and a final exam.

Note: Available only to English Majors and Medials, for whom it is a required course.

ENGL 290 003003/3.0 Seminar in Literary Interpretation

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and Slave Narratives

Instructor: Laura Murray
Offered: Fall Term
Units: 3.0

Description: Students in this section of ENGL290 will read Twain’s comic novel (1885) about the travels of an abused child and an escaped slave alongside three slave autobiographies: Narrative of the Life and Adventures of Henry Bibb, An American Slave, Written by Himself (1849), Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave, Written by Himself (1855), and Harriet Jacobs’s Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (1861). We will look into the historical context of these works, but also questions of genre, gender, form, style, and voice. How were slave writers constrained and enabled by the conventions of autobiography and testimony? How did Twain reinvent, subvert, or reflect on the slave narrative in fiction? Twain’s novel was written after the abolition of slavery, but is it really a post-slavery novel?

Requirements: Because one of its central objectives is to help students develop independent critical voices, the course will require intensive seminar engagement: all students will be expected to contribute to all discussions. Assignments will include short reading responses, a library research exercise, a presentation, and a final paper.

Note: Available only to English Majors and Medials, for whom it is a required course.

ENGL 290 001004/3.0 Seminar in Literary Interpretation

Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick

Instructor: Glenn Willmott
Offered: Winter Term
Units: 3.0

Description: This seminar course introduces students to the analytic interpretation of narrative fiction, and specifically to close reading the novel. Seminar discussion will be emphasized. Course requirements are designed to teach and test basic literary analytic skills rather than full literary argument development and essay composition. Our two required readings will be a formalist textbook, such as George Hughes’ Reading Novels (2002) or equivalent depending on availability, and Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick, or the Whale (1851).

Requirements: Weekly reading quizzes, four close reading assignments, a final examination, attendance and participation.

Note: Available only to English Majors and Medials, for whom it is a required course.

ENGL 290 002005/3.0 Seminar in Literary Interpretation

Charles Dickens’s Bleak House

Instructor: Carla Manfredi
Offered: Winter Term
Units: 3.0

Description: This seminar examines Charles Dickens’s 1852–1853 novel Bleak House. In addition to introducing students to the Victorian print and publishing culture, this seminar investigates the novel’s unique narrative structure and literary aesthetics; the representation of the English civil justice system and legal reform; and the depiction of scientific and technological advancement, most famously in the form of spontaneous human combustion. Through class discussion, individual research, and writing, this seminar allows students to develop their close-reading and analytical skills.

Requirements: Regular attendance and participation, weekly reading quizzes, two close reading assignments, an essay (2000–2500 words), and a final examination.

Note: Available only to English Majors and Medials, for whom it is a required course.

ENGL 290 003006/3.0 Seminar in Literary Interpretation

Reading Michael Ondaatje

Instructor: Heather Macfarlane
Offered: Winter Term
Units: 3.0

Description: The study of literature is a multidisciplinary undertaking, and offers insight into such numerous domains as aesthetics, language, sociology, gender, geography, politics and psychology, to name but a few. This seminar will allow participants to engage intimately with three Ondaatje texts in order to develop close-reading skills and hone their ability to think critically. Through discussion, research and writing we will consider a broad range of critical approaches to the texts themselves and to literature in general, and examine the impact of literature on our understanding of the world around us.

Requirements (subject to change): Active participation, a test, a seminar, an essay (2000–2500 words) and an exam.

Note: Available only to English Majors and Medials, for whom it is a required course.

ENGL 292/6.0 Introduction to Literary Criticism and Theory

Instructor: Maggie Berg
Offered: Fall and Winter Terms
Units: 6.0

Description: This course asks what we are doing when we read literature and why we are doing it. We will examine what people have proposed about the nature of literature and its role in our lives. In the Fall Term we will consider various ways in which people have interpreted literary texts in terms of their language and structure, author, social context, or reader. In the Winter Term we will focus on contemporary theories that are relevant to how we read literature, including Marxist, structuralist, poststructuralist, feminist, psychoanalytic, postcolonial, disability, and queer. Each term we will employ literary texts as “case studies,” to see the implications of the various theories for how we read works of literature.

Requirements: Two term papers, some creative projects, and an end of year examination.

ENGL 293/3.0 Introductory Approaches to Cultural Studies

Instructor: Chris Bongie
Offered: Winter Term
Units: 3.0

Description: This lecture course introduces students to some of the major critical approaches associated with the interdisciplinary field of “cultural studies,” with a particular emphasis on how that field has reshaped our understanding of popular culture. Cultural studies draws on a variety of disciplines, such as sociology, anthropology, film and media studies, but the primary focus here will be on the ways in which it intersects with literary studies and helps us better understand (for example) distinctions between “high” and “low” or “middlebrow” literary production, and the often disavowed relations between literature and the marketplace. The course proceeds chronologically, charting changing conceptions of popular culture in (for the most part) Britain and North America from the nineteenth century to the present, with specific attention paid to the genres of horror fiction and romance. Required readings for this course include Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1897), Daphne du Maurier’s Rebecca (1938), Stephen King’s Salem’s Lot (1975), and Stephenie Meyer’s Twilight (2005).

Requirements (provisional): Two or three short (3–4 pp.) papers, several in-class writing assignments, Moodle-based research assignment (in which students are asked to post a document analyzing some aspect of contemporary popular culture), and a final exam.

ENGL 310/6.0 Medieval Literature of the British Isles

Instructor: Matthew Scribner
Offered: Fall and Winter Terms
Units: 6.0

Description: When we think of the Middle Ages, we don’t usually think “multicultural,” but the British Isles in the early medieval period were home to a diverse set of languages and cultures. Irish, Scottish and Welsh people interacted with invaders who spoke Anglo-Saxon, Old Norse, and French, while everyone was struggling to reconcile their traditional pagan beliefs with those of the Latin Church. It was not until much later that (Middle) English established itself as the dominant language in the region, producing celebrated works of literature in multiple genres, including romances, autobiography, and plays. This course will follow medieval Britain’s literary transformation, starting with early Celtic texts and Old English poetry before moving to Latin and French, then ending with the Middle English classics. Texts studied could include The Mabinogion, Beowulf, The Lais of Marie de France, selected Canterbury Tales, and Le Morte D’Arthur.

All texts will be read in translation except for the relatively unchallenging late Middle English works. We will practice short poems in Middle English to make sure that we are up to speed before beginning those works.

Requirements (subject to change): Attendance, participation, essays, and a final exam.

ENGL 321/6.0 Renaissance Poetry and Prose

Instructor: Gwynn Dujardin
Offered: Fall and Winter Terms
Units: 6.0

Description: At the beginning of the sixteenth century, John Skelton described English verse as “ragged,/Tattered and jagged/Rudely rain beaten,/ Rusty and moth eaten.” A century and a half later, John Milton opened Paradise Lost proclaiming that he “pursues/Things unattempted yet in prose or rhyme.” Focusing on the development of English as a literary language, this small lecture course studies English writing from the Tudor era of King Henry VIII and Elizabeth I through Stuart England to the English Civil War. Lectures and discussions will examine ways that English Renaissance authors define their writing in relation to classical, continental, and medieval literatures, express contentious religious and political points of view, and publicly represent private concerns such as love and sexuality. Reading a diverse selection of verse and prose texts, we will also consider the relationship between popular and literary forms of writing, the immediate and long-standing impact of print publication (introduced to England in the late fifteenth century), and ways that different forms, modes, and genres interrelate and cross-pollinate throughout the period.

Requirements: Attendance; routine participation, including small group work; 1–2 creative assignments; two formal essays; and a final exam.

ENGL 326/6.0 Shakespeare and Renaissance Drama

Instructor: Scott-Morgan Straker / Ian Maness
Offered: Fall and Winter Terms
Units: 6.0

Description: Every so often moments of incredible cultural richness blaze forth: they appear to emerge from nowhere, and although they tend to last for only a short time, their influence can endure for centuries. English theatre in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries was one such cultural moment: Shakespeare is the most famous figure associated with it, but he was part of a community of writers—sometimes collaborators, sometimes rivals—who collectively took theatrical art to heights it had never reached before.

In this course we will examine some of the roots of this cultural flowering, and will discover that it really didn’t emerge from nowhere: it was the product of some very talented people working intelligently with a diverse array of rich source material. We will see how they shaped this material into the now-familiar genres of tragedy, comedy, and history, but we will also read texts that do not fit these categories (e.g., romance, masque). We will examine Shakespeare alongside his contemporary playwrights, including Thomas Kyd, Christopher Marlowe, Ben Jonson, Thomas Middleton, and John Webster, to see that the English theatre in this period really was a community of writers and performers who routinely worked together, influenced each other, and stole from each other. We will also study the theatre as an institution to understand the material conditions in which plays were commissioned, performed, censored, and published.

Requirements: Students will receive a grade for each term’s work; the final grade will be the average of the two. In the Fall Term, in addition to a short research assignment, an longer research essay, and a 2-hour exam, students will be expected to participate in discussions, read from plays, and perform short scenes. This is a course for students who are willing to talk and who do not want to spend the whole class sitting down.

ENGL 340/6.0 Romantic Literature

Instructor: Mark Jones
Offered: Fall and Winter Terms
Units: 6.0

Description: ENGL 340 surveys English Romantic literature, including poetry and poetics of Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats, fiction by Austen and Mary Shelley, and essays relating to poetics, politics, and contemporary events. Thematically, the course relates Romantic literature and literary theory to the authoritarian and counter-authoritarian currents of an age of revolution and counter-revolutionary war.

Requirements: 80% attendance, regular preparation and class participation, occasional quizzes, two term essays, and a 3-hour final exam.

ENGL 356/6.0 British Fiction of the 19th Century

Instructor: S. Brooke Cameron
Offered: Fall and Winter Terms
Units: 6.0

Description: The nineteenth century witnessed the dazzling rise of the novel as both the most popular and dominant literary form. This course will chart that rise through a representative sampling of texts. Our class conversations will attend closely to questions of form, character, and gender—for as Nancy Armstrong reminds us, the first “modern subject” was a woman (Desire and Domestic Fiction). We will therefore look at the range in gendered and classed characters associated with an ever-growing range in novel genres, including epistolary, gothic, domestic, bildungsroman, social problem, and sensational fiction. Possible authors include (but are not limited to) Jane Austen, Maria Edgeworth, Walter Scott, the Brontë sisters, Elizabeth Gaskell, Charles Dickens, George Eliot, Wilkie Collins, and Thomas Hardy.

Requirements (provisional): Two researched term papers, several in-class response papers, a group presentation, pop quizzes, regular participation, a mid-term and final exams.

ENGL 365/6.0 Modern and Contemporary Poetry

Instructor: Glenn Willmott / Yaël Schlick
Offered: Fall and Winter Terms
Units: 6.0

Description: This lecture-discussion course will introduce students to poetry from the fin-de-siècle to the 1940s in the Fall Term, and from the 1940s to the present in the Winter term. In Fall Term we will seek to understand how poets confronted the experiences and ideas of twentieth-century modernity, exploring what it meant to be modern, how to live and who to be, creating new kinds of selves and lives for a dramatically changing, crisis-ridden world. We will immerse ourselves in the work of four exemplary poets—Yeats, Eliot, Pound, and H.D.—while touching upon others of their generation. In the Winter Term, we’ll explore the diverse directions poetry takes from mid-century to the present day: from confessional writing to the Beats, from new formalism to poetry that explores our relations with the natural world. Winter term readings will include works by W.—H. Auden, Elizabeth Bishop, John Berryman, Seamus Heaney, James Merrill, John Ashbery, Jorie Graham, Mark Strand, Roo Borson, and other poets.

Requirements (provisional): Evaluation for each term will be calculated separately by each instructor and combined for your overall grade for the course. Each term grade will be based on a verse analysis presentation and submission (15%), a term essay (50%), a term examination (35%), and a participation adjustment of +/- 5% to the cumulative term grade.

ENGL 369/6.0 Modern and Contemporary Prose Fiction

There’s More to Life (and Sex) than Fifty Shades of Grey

Instructor: Asha Varadharajan
Offered: Fall and Winter Terms
Units: 6.0

Description: This course takes an international and cosmopolitan approach to Anglophone prose fiction in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. We will balance our interrogation of geographies, cultures, histories, ecologies, and sexualities with a serious attention to the generic innovations and transformations that make such interrogation possible. Some of the modes featured might be autobiography and/or the Bildungsroman; allegory; metafiction; crime, horror or pulp; travelogue; manifesto; cyberpunk; realism; satire. The authors under consideration might be Kathy Acker, Jessica Anderson, Mark Behr, Truman Capote, Percival Everett, Adam Foulds, Chester Himes, Mindy Hung, Harper Lee, Gautam Malkani, Andrew O’Hagan, Redmond O’Hanlon, Helen Oyeyemi, Chuck Palahniuk, Charles Portis, W. G. Sebald, Indra Sinha, John Steinbeck, Neal Stephenson, and Jeanette Winterson. Some of the questions we explore might be what does the word have to say in a world dominated by sound, spectacle, virtuality? what makes prose fiction erotic, uncanny, innocent, dangerous, hilarious, truthful, or just? what’s new about contemporaneity—haven’t we always been bored, anxious, restless, ephemeral, cynical, and anguished? how might the chosen works on the syllabus guide us safely past the “post”-modern, secular, colonial, to name only some of its incarnations? how do the works on our syllabus offer new ways of thinking and being human/animal/machine? of imagining “Nature’s body” and urban ecology? Evaluation will be based on participation including quizzes and posts to a discussion forum, essays, and a final exam.

Requirements: Participation including quizzes and posts to a discussion forum, essays, and a final exam.

ENGL 389/6.0 Context North America

The Environment in Contemporary North American and Indigenous Fiction

Instructor: Petra Fachinger
Offered: Fall and Winter Terms
Units: 6.0

Description: This course will explore how nature and the relationship between humans and the non-human world are constructed in contemporary American, Canadian, and Indigenous fiction in this age of climate change, environmental crises, population growth, and loss of biodiversity. We will begin by considering the non-fiction texts of some of the pioneers of ecological writing (Henry David Thoreau, Catharine Parr Traill, Aldo Leopold, and Rachel Carson), ecofeminism, and the Creation and Re-Creation stories in the Anishinaabe tradition, as retold by Basil Johnston. The course is organized in six interconnected sections: climate change; endangered species; water; biodiversity and organic farming; landscape, geopolitics, and war; post-apocalyptic writing. Among other things, we will explore how fictional texts that focus on environmental issues transform consciousness and create dialogue about sustainability and biocultural restoration and revitalization. We will consider a variety of modes and genres, including young adult fiction, the graphic novel, and Indigenous ways of storytelling, to explore questions of ecological poetics and environmental aesthetics. Course texts will include novels by Julia Alvarez, Margaret Atwood, Jamie Bastedo, Ann Eriksson, Jean Hegland, Linda Hogan, Barbara Kingsolver, Jim Lynch, Josh Neufeld, Ruth Ozeki, Leslie Marmon Silko, and Thomas Wharton.

Requirements: Participation including quizzes, two essays, and a final exam.

ENGL 421001/3.0 Topics in Renaissance Drama I

Topic: The Classical and the Popular in Renaissance Drama

Instructor: Elizabeth Hanson
Offered: Fall Term
Units: 3.0

Description: The drama of Renaissance England arguable achieves its extraordinary vitality through the fusion it effects of classical forms and English popular traditions. In this course we will examine this fusion in the works of Christopher Marlowe, William Shakespeare and Ben Jonson. All three playwrights attended humanist grammar schools where they encountered the works of Plautus, Terence and Seneca. From these plays they gleaned genres (comedy and tragedy), situations (identity mix-ups, revenge plots) and character types (the wily servant, the noble avenger, the braggart soldier). But they also encountered English popular drama. From this they gleaned different character types (the Vice, the clown, the shrew), modes of signification (allegory) and a subtle sense of theatrical space. In this course we will first look at some instances of both the classical and the popular dramatic traditions and then at some of the major plays of the English Renaissance (Dr Faustus, Hamlet, Twelfth Night, The Alchemist, and Bartholomew Fair) which draw on both. Our goal will be to assess what thematic and dramatic meanings are made available by the combinations of classical and popular English traditions these playwrights wrought.

Requirements: Students will be required to participate in class discussion, write several short responses on Moodle, and stage a scene and perform it for the class, then write a final paper of 10 pages discussing the decisions involved in the staging and the implications of these for an understanding of the play. There will be a 2-hour final exam.

ENGL 421002/3.0 Topics in Renaissance Drama I

Topic: Shakespeare and Early Modern Print Culture

Instructor: Marta Straznicky
Offered: Winter Term
Units: 3.0

Description: This course will explore the publication, dissemination, and readership of Shakespeare’s plays in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. Approaching Shakespeare’s texts as material books, we will learn about the early modern book trade, the production and circulation of print material in the period, literacy and readership, and the relationships among performance, script, actor’s part, and printed play. Our focus will be on plays that have a particularly interesting or complicated textual history: Hamlet, King Lear, Henry V, and Pericles, but there will be an opportunity to explore any of Shakespeare’s texts in depth. Towards the end of course, we will also study the history of Shakespearean textual scholarship, including the technical, legal, and theoretical issues involved in electronic editions.

Requirements: Assignments will include several short research exercises, an in-class test of a factual nature, a 15-minute presentation, a research essay developed from the presentation, and a final exam.

ENGL 436001/3.0 Group I: Special Topics I

Topic: Medieval and Tudor Drama

Instructor: Ruth Wehlau
Offered: Winter Term
Units: 3.0

Description: Medieval and Tudor drama is a lively and accessible genre, dealing with serious themes of life and death and yet often filled with comic horseplay. This course will sample a variety of plays from the medieval and Tudor era, including biblical plays from the mystery cycles, the Croxton Play of the Sacrament, and the morality plays Mankind, Everyman, and Magnificence. All plays will be read in Middle English, but students will receive help and instruction in acquiring the skills needed to read and pronounce the language.

Requirements: Students will be expected to write an essay and an exam, and to do a class presentation. Students will also be assessed on their class participation and to perform or read a portion of a play in conjunction with other students.

ENGL 441001/3.0 Topics in Romantic Literature I

Topic: Poetry and Poetics of Wordsworth

Instructor: Mark Jones
Offered: Fall Term
Units: 3.0

Description: Introductory seminar on Wordsworth’s major works in poetry and poetics, emphasizing Lyrical Ballads and other works (both lyric and narrative) of his “golden decade” (1797–1807).

Requirements: 80% attendance, regular preparation and class participation, one seminar facilitation, one or two essays, and a 2-hour final exam.

ENGL 441002/3.0 Topics in Romantic Literature I

Topic: Poetry and Poetics of John Keats

Instructor: Mark Jones
Offered: Winter Term
Units: 3.0

Description: Introductory seminar on Keats’s major works, spanning his short career but emphasizing his stunning final volume of 1820.

Requirements: 80% attendance, regular preparation and class participation, one seminar facilitation, one or two essays, and a 2-hour final exam.

ENGL 446001/3.0 Topics in Literature of the Americas I

Topic: Literary New York City in the Gilded Age

Instructor: S. Brooke Cameron
Offered: Fall Term
Units: 3.0

Description:

“New York is appalling, fantastically charmless and elaborately dire.”—Henry James

This course will survey a range of authors writing about urban experience in New York City at the end of the nineteenth century (the “Gilded Age”). We will look at how writers’ innovative approaches to both narrative form and content produce a literary history of this unique city as a site of exhilaration and hope, as well as anxiety and/or despair. Novels by Henry James and William Dean Howells paint a picture of urban prosperity and the politics of class and polite society, while authors such as George Egerton and Theodore Dreiser write of the newcomer within the cosmopolitan city of opportunity. Still others, such as Stephen Crane and Jacob Riis, document the city’s slums and its underclass or marginalized poor. We will conclude the course with a discussion of the city’s literary legacy, from Edith Wharton’s Age of Innocence to “neo-Victorian” interpretations and steampunk. Because this course places such a strong emphasis on the link between place and text, we will also experiment with digital technologies in order to “map” the literary city—the city of impressions, literary networks, and dystopian dreams.

Requirements: Regular participation, two short response papers, a final research essay, a final exam, and a collaborative “mapping” project.

ENGL 451001/3.0 Topics in Victorian Literature I

Topic: At Table with the Victorians: Gastronomy, Cookery Books, and Food in Nineteenth-Century Literature

Instructor: Heather Evans
Offered: Fall Term
Units: 3.0

Description: This course will offer an introduction to the history and literature of nineteenth-century gastronomy, the art of fine dining. Treating the long nineteenth century as a grand literary banquet, we will whet our appetites on gastronomic treatises by writers such as Alexandre Balthazar Laurent Grimod de la Reynière, William Kitchiner, Jean-Anthelme Brillat-Savarin, and Thomas Walker, and nibble our way through tasty essays, fiction and poems penned by both epicurean and abstemious writers, such as Charles Dickens, William Makepeace Thackeray, Lewis Carroll, Elizabeth Gaskell, Christina Rossetti, and Sarah Grand. Along the way, we will snack on Victorian cookbooks and stir up issues such as vegetarianism, famine, the emergence of the restaurant, women cooks, tippling, temperance, and the importance of tea.

Requirements: One seminar presentation, one term paper, active participation, and a final exam.

ENGL 451002/3.0 Topics in Victorian Literature I

Topic: Slumming in the 19th Century

Instructor: S. Brooke Cameron
Offered: Winter Term
Units: 3.0

Description: This course will look at Victorian literature’s effort to make visible working-class and urban poverty, or the costs of industrialism and the shift to a new capitalist economy. So-called “slumming” was an obsession with Victorian citizens and writers. As a category, “slumming” covers everything from a voyeuristic tourism of “darkest London” to genuine acts of social reform and charitable efforts. We will read a variety of texts covering this wide range in forms of nineteenth-century slumming. These readings will be divided into 4 course units: 1) the politics of dirt, 2) the city of dreadful night, 3) in darkest London and the way out, and 4) the aesthetics of the city. Rather than reproduce any impulse of voyeurism—therein “othering” the urban poor—we will instead focus on literary efforts to understand and, at times, humanize the working-class and urban poor. We will consider the important role of Victorian literature as an active participant in writing cultural history and urban reform. Texts will include Oliver Twist, by Charles Dickens; The Sign of the Four, by Arthur Conan Doyle; A Child of the Jago, by Arthur Morison; Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, by Robert Louis Stevenson; and The Picture of Dorian Gray, by Oscar Wilde.

Requirements: Regular participation, a short group presentation, response papers, a final research paper, and a final exam.

ENGL 456001/3.0 Group II: Special Topics I

Topic: Drugs, Death, and Detectives: Thomas De Quincey and the Literature of Addiction

Instructor: Robert Morrison
Offered: Winter Term
Units: 3.0

Description: This course examines Thomas De Quincey and his portraits of addiction in works such as Confessions of an English Opium-Eater (1821) and On Murder Considered as One of the Fine Arts (1827). It then examines the ways in which De Quincey’s various self-representations are exploited, undermined, and appropriated in a series of texts, including Charles Baudelaire’s The Flowers of Evil (1857), Robert Louis Stevenson’s Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (1886), Arthur Conan Doyle’s Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (1892), Peter Ackroyd’s Dan Leno and the Limehouse Golem (1994), and David Morrell’s Murder as a Fine Art (2013).

Requirements: An essay, a final exam, class participation, and a series of unannounced quizzes.

ENGL 461001/3.0 Topics in Modern/Contemporary British Literature I

Topic: War Literature between the Wars

Instructor: Patricia Rae
Offered: Fall Term
Units: 3.0

Description: This seminar will concentrate on literature and culture in Britain between the First and Second World Wars (1919–1939). Our focus will be on examples of the elegy and the memoir, two important genres in an era marked by a “boom in sorrow” (W. H. Auden.)

The course content will be divided roughly into two halves. In the first half of the course, we’ll think about the First World War. We’ll familiarize ourselves with the discourses of consolation used both during the war, and in its aftermath, to cope with its extraordinary cost in human lives. We’ll start by looking at some World War I elegies for the dead, by Rupert Brooke and others, that encourage recovery from loss, or what Freud called “success” in mourning. We’ll then turn to poems that approach loss and sorrow differently: anti-elegies whose aim is to disrupt or prevent consolation, or to cultivate “melancholia.” Our analyses of these alternative responses to grief will assist us as we turn to two famous memoirs of the War, by Siegfried Sassoon and Vera Brittain. Both memoirs describe World War I from the vantage point of the early 1930s. They offer windows into the grief and suffering it produced, but also critique the consolatory strategies and commemorative rituals it inspired. We’ll reflect on the political messages implicit in these critiques of consolation: their pacifism, their anti-Arcadianism, their recipes for constructive social action. Supplemented by poems by women elegists (and by some male misogynists) of the War, the memoirs will also get us thinking about how views of mourning are inflected by gender. Finally, with both poems and memoirs in mind, we’ll consider the role commemorative practices play in constructing “collective memory.” We’ll think about the anxieties associated with commemoration, the tension between “collective” and “personal” memory, and the often paradoxical relationship between commemoration and forgetting. Our discussion will be enriched by references to commemorations of the centenary of the start of the war taking place in 2014; students should emerge with tools enabling them to assess the merits and weaknesses of those events.

In the second half of the term, we’ll begin asking questions about what happened to the consolatory and anti-consolatory discourses of World War I as the 1930s progressed and Fascism became a mounting threat in Europe. In this context, we’ll focus especially on British writers’ responses when pressured to “take sides” on the Spanish Civil War (1936–39): a conflict widely regarded as the first great test of the anti-fascist movement and a dress-rehearsal for World War II. Looking again at poems, by several little-known poets, and a memoir—George Orwell’s famous account of the war, Homage to Catalonia—we’ll ask how elegiac discourse changes with this, very different, war. We’ll ask whether the categories of elegy and anti-elegy still apply, and we’ll consider some entirely new types of poetry on loss that reflects the truth of the conflict. Turning to Orwell’s memoir, we’ll ask how his account of the Spanish war and its costs compare with those of World War I. How do the discourses of consolation and commemoration play out in it? What distinctive forms of consolation (or its opposite) are to be found there?

We’ll conclude the course by reading some poems written just as World War is about to break out for the second time in just over two decades. What happens to elegiac consolations when World War repeats itself so soon?

Requirements: One group seminar, one research paper, and a final exam.

Exclusion: This course will be closed to students who have previously taken ENGL 274/3.0 Literature and War.

ENGL 466 001001/3.0 Topics in Modern/Contemporary Canadian Literature I

Topic: Canadian Poetry: Modernism and After

Instructor: Tracy Ware
Offered: Fall Term
Units: 3.0

Description: After a brief look at the Confederation poets, this course will spend about five weeks on Canadian Modernism and five weeks on Canadian Postmodernism. We will try to elaborate working definitions of such terms as we proceed, recognizing their limitations as well as their usefulness. What category could ever describe such poets as Leonard Cohen or Anne Carson? How does the sonnet (which we will read in the Wells anthology) relate to these broad terms? The course will demonstrate that, to a surprising extent, poets in Canada are at least as politically engaged as novelists, and Modernists at least as engaged as Postmodernists. Students must still decide for themselves if political engagement is always a good thing, and we will weigh the claims of aesthetics and politics as necessary. Since many of the enduring generalization about Canadian literature are based on some of the poets on this course, we will also consider the debates inspired by the influential work of such critics as Margaret Atwood, Northrop Frye, Frank Davey, and D.M.R. Bentley.

Requirements: There will be one mid-term examination, one term paper, one seminar presentation, and a final examination.

ENGL 466 002002/3.0 Topics in Modern/Contemporary Canadian Literature I

Topic: Gay Voices in Canada

Instructor: Robert May
Offered: Fall Term
Units: 3.0

Description: In 1943, critic John Sutherland referred to a homoerotic image in a poem by Patrick Anderson as “twisted” and “not quite normal,” effectively outing Anderson at a time when homosexual relations were still punishable in Canada with prison sentences. Sutherland’s attack, and subsequent half-hearted retraction, shone a harsh spotlight on Canada’s ambivalent attitude towards gayness. This course will trace the growth and development of gay poetry in Canada, beginning at the turn of the twentieth century with trailblazers such as Frank Oliver Call and Émile Nelligan, proceeding into the middle part of the century with figures such as Edward A. Lacey (who published what has been called the first “openly gay” collection of Canadian poetry) and bill bissett (the “extremity” of whose work was denounced in the House of Commons), and ending with some of the most recent gay Canadian poets such as John Barton and R. M. Vaughan. The course will examine these poets’ depiction of same-sex male desire, the male body, and the gay experience, in the larger contexts of Canadian nationhood, culture, and evolving sexual politics, towards elucidating their legitimate place in the canon of Canadian literature.

Requirements: Course requirements include one term paper, one seminar presentation with both an oral and a written component, and one two-hour exam. Students will also be evaluated on class participation.

ENGL 466 001003/3.0 Topics in Modern/Contemporary Canadian Literature I

Topic: Canadian Short Story Collections

Instructor: Tracy Ware
Offered: Winter Term
Units: 3.0

Description: In Canada, short fiction remains vital though sometimes overshadowed by the novel. This course will investigate the ways in which five authors arrange their stories into books: at one end of the spectrum, a sequence of stories may have the same protagonist and setting, as in Margaret Laurence’s A Bird in the House; at the other extreme, a miscellaneous collection may be most notable for the diversity of its stories. Somewhere in between come the typical books of Alistair MacLeod and Alice Munro, with their recurring themes and strong sense of place. In addition to A Bird in the House, we will read MacLeod’s The Lost Salt Gift of Blood, Munro’s Runaway, Rohinton Mistry’s Tales From Firozsha Baag, and Margaret Atwood’s Moral Disorder.

Requirements: The course work will involve one term paper, one seminar presentation, a mid-term examination, and a final examination.

ENGL 466 002004/3.0 Topics in Modern/Contemporary Canadian Literature I

Topic: Diasporic and Transnational Perspectives in Contemporary Canadian Fiction

Instructor: Petra Fachinger
Offered: Winter Term
Units: 3.0

Description: This seminar explores the representation of diasporic and transnational contexts in contemporary Canadian fiction. Transnationalism has become fundamental to debates about literature as scholars wrestle with the interrelated phenomena of economic and cultural globalization, migration, diaspora, and global travel. What are the connections among literature, nationalism, and cultural identity in the context of ever-expanding transnational relations? What is the relationship between diaspora and transnationalism? How is the intersection between the local, the national, and the transnational imagined in Canadian fiction? The increasingly transnational character of Canadian writing also raises questions about the creative, institutional, and political conditions that shape it and about identity formation, trauma, multidirectional memory, and citizenship. The seminar is organized in four interconnected sections: transnational shifts in Asian Canadian fiction; narratives of war, terrorism, and peacekeeping; writing the global city; narratives of transnational and transracial adoption. Course texts may include Gurjinder Basran’s Everything Was Good-By, Anita Rau Badami’s Can You Hear the Nightbird Call?, Dionne Brand’s What We All Long For, Catherine Bush’s The Rules of Engagement, Camilla Gibb’s The Beauty of Humanity Movement, Maggie Helwig’s Between Mountains, Jen Sookfong Lee’s The End of East, Kyo Maclear’s The Letter Opener, Tessa McWatt’s Step Closer, Kerri Sakamoto’s One Hundred Million Hearts, and Madeleine Thien’s Certainty.

Requirements: Active participation in discussion, one group presentation, a midterm exam, and a final paper.

ENGL 476001/3.0 Topics in Postcolonial Literature I

Topic: Terra Australis: An Introduction to Australian Literature and Culture

Instructor: Asha Varadharajan
Offered: Winter Term
Units: 3.0

Description: Convicts, crocodile hunters, celebrity couples, kangaroos, and colourful slang…. Crikey! Surely there’s more to the land down under than meets the eye (or mouth that savours Foster’s beer)! This course traces the complex and contentious formation of Australian national culture in and through an eclectic selection of significant literary and cinematic works. Some effort will be made to include art, music, and documentary film in our reflections on the shaping of Australian identity, socio-political and environmental concerns, and moral and cultural values. These works probe, with both irreverence and insight, the “anxious proximities” of settler and aborigine, including the founding of the nation as a penal colony; the colonial manifestations of gothic, romance, and adventure in tales, parables, and fables; the tropes of mateship, “the bush,” and “the dreaming”; the fantasy of “the white nation” and the meaning of tolerance; the cultural cringe; and the antipodean I/eye. Some of the authors and poets under scrutiny are Marcus Clarke, Katharine Susannah Prichard, Henry Handel Richardson, Peter Goldsworthy, Christos Tsiolkas, Sally Morgan, Alexis Wright, Patrick White, Christina Stead, Louis Stone, George Johnston, Judith Wright, Les Murray, and David Malouf. We will trace the representation of aboriginal culture, epistemology, and history in films such as Rabbit-Proof Fence, Walkabout, The Chant of Jimmy Blacksmith, Samson and Delilah, The Fringe-Dwellers, and Bran Nue Dae; pair films such as Romper Stomper with Stone’s Jonah or Gallipoli with Malouf’s Fly Away Peter to explore urban violence and war and masculinity respectively; consider adaptations of Tsiolkas’ Loaded and The Slap to reflect on class, ethnicity, the family, misogyny, and sexuality; and examine The Chaser among other examples of humour and anarchy on the Australian scene.

Requirements: Assigned and voluntary participation, reaction pieces or journal entries, and a major research project using the resources of visual, aural/oral, and digital cultures.

ENGL 481 001001/3.0 Topics in Indigenous Literatures I

Topic: Introduction to Indigenous Literatures in Canada

Instructor: Heather Macfarlane
Offered: Fall Term
Units: 3.0

Description: This course examines Indigenous novels, traditional stories, poetry, short stories, plays and films from various time periods and numerous nations across Canada. We will study the themes, aesthetics and politics of the texts using a combination of culturally specific and pan-Native approaches. In order to develop a broader understanding of the powerful anti-colonial sentiment at the core of Indigenous cultural production, we will also consider the texts in the light of current critical methodologies.

Texts may include An Anthology of Canadian Native Literature in English, 4th edition; Dry Lips Oughta Move to Kapuskasing, by Tomson Highway; Monkey Beach, by Eden Robinson; The Epic of Qayaq, by Lela Kiana Oman; and Halfbreed, by Maria Campbell.

Requirements (subject to change): Active participation, a test, a seminar, an essay, and an exam.

ENGL 481 002002/3.0 Topics in Indigenous Literatures I

Topic: Aboriginal and Chinese Canadian Connections in Contemporary Literature in Canada

Instructor: Petra Fachinger
Offered: Fall Term
Units: 3.0

Description: This seminar is inspired by Rita Wong’s article “Decolonizasian: Reading Asian and First Nations Relations in Literature” and the 2012 special issue of Ricepaper Magazine entitled “Aboriginal & Asian Canadian Writers.” As Wong observes, “The challenging relationships between subjects positioned as ‘Asian Canadian’ and ‘indigenous’ raise questions regarding immigrant complicity in the colonization of land as well as the possibility of making alliances toward decolonization” (158–59). Chinese migration to British Columbia, which dates back to the 1780s, reconfigured colonial relations between Aboriginal peoples and European Canadians. We will discuss novels and short stories that portray relationships between Chinese and Indigenous people, like Sky Lee’s Disappearing Moon Café and Lee Maracle’s “Yin Chin,” and read other texts like Wayson Choy’s The Jade Peony and Ruby Slipperjack’s Silent Words in juxtaposition to tease out textual and cultural affinities as well as fundamental differences. In its discussion of the relationship between indigeneity and (the Chinese) diaspora, the seminar will also be concerned with the implications and limitations of cross-cultural and textual affiliative politics. The seminar is organized in six interconnected sections: joint histories, cross-cultural relations, and decolonizing antiracism; knowledge holders, language and storytelling, decolonization and “reconciliation”; rewriting the European Gothic and the “spectres of settlement”; “living in the hyphen” as life writing; transnational/transracial adoption; assimilation and “the lifeblood of resurgence.”

Requirements: Active participation in discussion, one group presentation, a midterm exam, and a final paper.

ENGL 481003/3.0 Topics in Indigenous Literatures I

Topic: The Role of Writing

Instructor: Armand Ruffo
Offered: Winter Term
Units: 3.0

Description: In her much quoted essay, “The Disempowerment of First North American Native Peoples and Empowerment Through Writing,” Okanagan writer and scholar Jeannette Armstrong challenges Indigenous writers to use their writing to decolonize their people. This seminar will consider the role of writing in creating a sense of identity and empowerment among Indigenous peoples as it provides a vehicle to speak back to the colonizer and increasingly to the colonized. As such, we will examine a wide range of texts, which may include storytelling, fiction, poetry and playwriting as well as other forms of creative expression, such as film, produced by Indigenous people in North America. Questions will naturally arise in considering recent work in such areas as diaspora, healing, self-determination, reconciliation, and language. For example, what can colonized peoples hope to achieve, if anything, in re-imagining their experiences? Can a creative work really serve as an effective vehicle for attaining sovereignty or, in the least, redress? In order to gain a broader understanding of current cultural production, we will consider socio-political and historical influences; we will also draw on the critical work of Indigenous traditionalists and scholars for culturally specific perspectives.

ENGL 486001/3.0 Group III: Special Topics I

Topic: Antarctica and the Imagination

Instructor: Yaël Schlick
Offered: Fall Term
Units: 3.0

Description: This course will explore just the tip of the literary iceberg about this southernmost continent. We’ll begin with an overview of Antarctica’s history and familiarize ourselves with it through one film, one short introductory work, and one travel narrative. The remaining weeks of term will be devoted to studying how Antarctica has been represented in fiction and in popular culture. We’ll examine how it was imagined by authors who never went there (Poe, Verne, Lovecraft), depicted by those who did (Bainbridge, Robinson), and portrayed by writers intent to revise Antarctica’s contentious history—or even fiction about Antarctica—through their writing (Le Guin, Johnson). Our discussions will explore the artistic and ideological positions of these texts, their strategies of representation and use of the imagination when depicting unknown places, their fictionalization of historic expeditions to Antarctica, and their consideration of ecological threat to pristine places on our globe. Readings will include Klaus Dodd’s The Antarctic: A Very Short Introduction, Apsley-Cherry Garrard’s The Worst Journey in the World, Poe’s Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket, Jules Verne’s The Sphinx of the Ice, H. P. Lovecraft’s At the Mountains of Madness, Ursula Le Guin’s “Sur,” Beryl Bainbridge’s The Birthday Boys, Mat Johnson’s Pym, and Kim Stanely Robinson’s Antarctica. We’ll wrap up with Monty Python’s “Scott of the Antarctic” and a discussion of other recent re-enactments of Antarctican feats. Bill Manhire’s literary anthology The Wide White Page, and Elizabeth Leane’s study Antarctica in Fiction, will serve as touchstones for our exploration.

Requirements: Course work will include a seminar presentation, a term paper, class discussion, short weekly writing assignments, and a final exam.

ENGL 486 001002/3.0 Group III: Special Topics I

Topic: T. S. Eliot and Virginia Woolf

Instructor: Gabrielle McIntire
Offered: Winter Term
Units: 3.0

Description: T. S. Eliot and Virginia Woolf were almost exact contemporaries (born in 1888 and 1882, respectively), readers and critics of each others’ work, and close friends for over twenty years. Although they are rarely considered together as a pair, Eliot and Woolf exemplify some of the most fascinating contestations at the heart of literary modernisms: aesthetic and formal innovation, cultural critique, gender troubling, and explorations of the sacred and the secular after “the death of God.” Together we will consider some of the striking correspondences and affinities that exist in Eliot and Woolf’s poetic, aesthetic, and thematic preoccupations as we read Eliot’s major poetry from “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” through “Gerontion,” The Waste Land, Ash-Wednesday, and Four Quartets, and engage with several of Woolf’s most important novels, including To the Lighthouse, Mrs. Dalloway, and The Waves.

Requirements: 35% 2500-word term paper; 15% seminar presentation; 10% group presentation; 10% active and engaged participation and attendance; 30% final exam.

ENGL 486 002003/3.0 Group III: Special Topics I

Topic: The Graphic Novel: Visualizing History and Bearing Witness to Trauma

Instructor: Heather Evans
Offered: Winter Term
Units: 3.0

Description: “It is rare for a new genre to appear in any art form,” remarks Stephen E. Tabachnick in an essay on pedagogy, yet “[with] the emergence of the graphic or comic book novel, precisely that phenomenon has been happening before the excited gaze of [readers] of both literature and the visual arts.” This course will provide students with an opportunity to explore and to apply to this relatively new literary form the close reading and critical analytical skills they have become accustomed to applying to more familiar genres. Framed loosely by a consideration of the history of the genre, we will interrogate the relationships between the graphic novel and other forms of sequential art. Given that the development of the graphic novel by writers such as Will Eisner, Art Spiegelman, Joe Sacco, Marjane Satrapi, and Alan Moore has coincided with growing representation in literature of troubling social phenomena, our course will especially focus on ways that the genre gives voice to personal trauma such as mental illness, sexual abuse, and loss, and bears witness to such cultural trauma as racism, revolution, war, and genocide.

Requirements: One seminar presentation, one term paper, active participation and a final exam.

ENGL 496001/3.0 Topics in Literary Criticism and Theory I

Topic: Reading Subjectivity

Instructor: Maggie Berg
Offered: Fall Term
Units: 3.0

Description: Most of us believe we have an essential, or core, self, but poststructuralist theory has challenged this idea. We will examine a selection of theorists who argue that the individual is a function of language, and consider the implications of this construction of the self. We will ask how we know who we are and to what degree we possess agency.

We will examine selections from the work of Louis Althusser, Michel Foucault, Jacques Lacan, Judith Butler, and others. We will also read Tom Chatfield, How to Thrive in a Digital Age.

Requirements: A learning journal, a term paper, an examination, and participation.

ENGL 590/3.0 Senior Essay Option

Instructor: Various
Offered: Winter Term
Units: 3.0

Description:

From the Arts & Science Calendar: A critical essay of at least 7500 words on a topic of the student’s choice, written under the supervision of a faculty member. For additional information, students should consult the Department, preferably in the spring of their third year. Open only to students in the final year of a Major or Medial Plan in English.

A prospectus for the essay signed by two supervisors must be submitted to the chair of undergraduate studies by the beginning of winter term; the essay should be submitted by March 10. For more information, see ENGL 590/3.0: Rules Governing the Writing of the Honours Essay (PDF).

Counts Toward: Consult the table

Prerequisite: To be eligible to write the Senior Essay, a student must have permission of the Department, and a minimum GPA of 3.5 in at least 24.0 previous English units. The 3.50 GPA requirement may be waived in exceptional cases by request of the essay’s faculty supervisor.

CWRI 293/3.0 Creative Writing in Prose

Instructor: Carolyn Smart
Offered: Fall Term
Units: 3.0

Description: An intensive workshop course focusing on the writing and editing of short fiction. Students attempt several approaches to the writing of short fiction and complete the course with a formal submission for publication in a magazine. There are in-class discussions on editing and publishing. By the end of the term the student will be able to bring more sharply refined skills to the reading of their work, and edit themselves with a more clearly intuitive, finely practiced eye. They will have an intimate look at contemporary Canadian writers and writing, learned first hand through interaction with their instructor, an award-winning professional writer, as well as through public readings and personal interaction with authors visiting the class.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor, based on writing samples of either a short story or a non-rhyming poem.

To apply to take a CWRI course, please read the instructions on the Creative Writing page.

CWRI 294/3.0 Creative Writing in Poetry

Instructor: Armand Ruffo
Offered: Winter Term
Units: 3.0

Description: This seminar focuses on the writing and editing of poetry and includes a detailed discussion and analysis of the students’ work. It is therefore intended for the self-motivated student and seeks to develop a professional competence in the writing of poetry. The majority of class time will be spent primarily on the workshop process; however, a portion of each class will be devoted to discussing poetics and analyzing the work of established poets. During the course of the term students will be expected to write a new poem each week, participate in the workshop in a respectful manner, accept detailed analysis of their work, and keep up with the readings and assignments. In addition, each student will present a mini-seminar on a contemporary poem by an established poet, which will demonstrate the writing technique being studied for that class. Students will be expected to photocopy and distribute their poems to their peers each week, which will likewise exhibit an understanding of poetic technique. Each week the instructor will select work from various students for discussion. Selections from the text and/or other reading material will be assigned for discussion.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor, based on writing samples.

To apply to take a CWRI course, please read the instructions on the Creative Writing page.

CWRI 295/3.0 Creative Writing I

Instructor: Carolyn Smart
Offered: Fall Term
Units: 3.0

Description: A practical creative writing workshop, concentrating on short fiction and poetry. Students may concentrate on short fiction or poetry all term, or they may choose to alternate between the two genres in the writing workshops and assignments. Part of the final assignment will be a submission to a literary magazine.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor, based on writing samples of either a short story or a non-rhyming poem.

To apply to take a CWRI course, please read the instructions on the Creative Writing page.

CWRI 295 700/3.0 Creative Writing I

Online Course

Instructor: Carolyn Smart
Offered: Winter Term
Units: 3.0

Description: An online introduction to the art of composing fiction and poetry. Students submit independent creative work to the instructor and to their classmates for feedback and read and respond to their classmates’ writing. All writings and course materials are shared electronically via web site and e-mail. The course is designed to help students write regularly and to enjoy writing. By sharing work in progress, students learn from and support one another and develop critical judgement. They also practice computer and internet skills and become comfortable working online.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor, based on writing samples of either a short story or a non-rhyming poem.

To apply to take a CWRI course, please read the instructions on the Creative Writing page.

CWRI 296/3.0 Creative Writing II

Instructor: Carolyn Smart
Offered: Winter Term
Units: 3.0

Description: This course is structured entirely around the creative writing workshop. The concentration is on short fiction and poetry, though memoir and creative non-fiction are options. There is intensive focus on publication and editing in a class-produced anthology, launched at the end of term with a public reading.

Prerequisite: One or more of CWRI 293, 294 and 295, plus permission of the instructor.

To apply to take a CWRI course, please read the instructions on the Creative Writing page.