Queen's Film and Media

Queen's Film and Media

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Film and Media Course Offerings: 2017-18

(Timetable is Subject to Change without Notice)

NOTE:  STSC 309*, STSC 339*, DEVS 305, IDIS 311*, and IDIS 410* may be used as Optional Film units and also see NEW FILM Centric Options. These FILM Centric Options include INTS 326/3.0; LLCU 206/3.0; LLCU 207/3.0; LLCU 214/3.0; LLCU 226; LLCU 249/3.0; LLCU 308/3.0; LLCU 309/3.0; LLCU 326/3.0; LLCU 328/3.0; LLCU 358/3.0; RELS 237/3.0; SPAN 458/3.0. 

See Programs for required Courses.

(This Film Centric Options list contains courses offered through other Departments. In accordance with Academic Regulation 2.5, students do not have enrollment priority in all of these courses. Access to these courses may only be made available during the Open Enrollment period, and then only if space permits.)

 

Learning Hours Legend:

L Lectures G Group Learning
T Tutorials I Individual Instruction
S Seminars O Online Activities
Lb Labs Oc Off-campus Activity
Pc Practicum P Private Study

Course Offerings 2017-18

 

FILM 104/3.0                     Film Form and Modern Culture to 1970

 Introduction to tools and methods of visual and aural analysis and to historical and social methods, with examples primarily from the history of cinema and other moving‐image media to 1970. NOTE    Offered only at the Bader International Study Centre, Herstmonceux.


 FILM 106/3.0                   Film Form and Modern Culture from 1970

Introduction to tools and methods of visual and aural analysis and to historical and social methods, with examples primarily from cinema and other moving‐image media dating from 1970 to the present. NOTE    Offered only at the Bader International Study Centre, Herstmonceux. LEARNING HOURS   120 (36L;24G;12O;48Oc) EXCLUSION    No more than 3.0 units from BISC 100/3.0; FILM 106/3.0.


FILM 110/6.0/Fall/Winter               Film, Culture and Communication

Introduction to analysis of film, television, new media and other related forms of contemporary culture. Includes classical and contemporary Hollywood cinema, Canadian film and television, alternatives in international cinema, as well as recent developments on the internet, in gaming, and in social media. LEARNING HOURS    216 (24L;24Lb;36T;36Pc;96P)   

Instructors: G. Kibbins/ S. Lord/D. Naaman/ B. Allan


FILM 206/3.0/Fall                  Research, Writing, and Presentation Methods

Topic for 2017/2018: “Seeing Films That ‘Should Not Be Seen’.” We shall learn about critical review and essay writing, concentrating on film and media works that, in different historical times and contexts, critics, politicians, activists, theologians, and/or governments have argued that viewers should not see, or should not even be seen. We will use this frame as a means of undertaking research on the relationships between these debates and the films themselves, understanding these contentious film and media works in their historical, aesthetic and political contexts, and to underscore the need for detailed research to understand, critique and interpret film and media and the debates that surround them. Short presentations will focus on placing these in their historical, political, and aesthetic contexts.  NOTE    Priority will be given to FILM, STSC, and COCA students. LEARNING HOURS    108 (36L;24Lb;48P) PREREQUISITE    (A grade of B‐ in FILM 110/6.0) or (a GPA of 2.60 in FILM 104/3.0 and FILM 106/3.0) or (a GPA of 2.60 in BISC 100/3.0 and FILM 104/3.0).

Instructor: S. MacKenzie


FILM 216/3.0/Fall                       Historical Inquiry

Introduction to historical research and analysis of narrative and other films. Examines works, from a range of periods and settings, and the conditions that shaped their production, circulation and reception. NOTE    Priority will be given to FILM, STSC, and COCA students. LEARNING HOURS    108 (36L;24Lb;48P) PREREQUISITE    (A grade of B‐ in FILM 110/6.0) or (a GPA of 2.60 in FILM 104/3.0 and FILM 106/3.0) or (a GPA of 2.60 in BISC 100/3.0 and FILM 104/3.0).

Instructor: P. Baxter


FILM 226/3.0/Winter                             Critical Inquiry

Textual analysis of narrative and other films, including examination of formal, aesthetic, and narrative techniques and conventions, and their production of meaning in social and political contexts. NOTE    Priority will be given to FILM, STSC, and COCA students. LEARNING HOURS    108 (36L;24Lb;48P) PREREQUISITE    (A grade of B‐ in FILM 110/6.0) or (a GPA of 2.60 in FILM 104/3.0 and FILM 106/3.0) or (a GPA of 2.60 in BISC 100/3.0 and FILM 104/3.0).

Instructor: K. Bertrand


FILM 236/3.0/Winter                     Media and Cultural Studies

Introduction to cultural and social theory of film and other media as it relates to the tension between citizenship and consumerism. Examines roles, functions, and impact of mass media technologies, institutions, and practices in both scholarly and practical forms. NOTE    Also offered online. Consult Arts and Science Online. Learning Hours may vary. NOTE    Priority will be given to FILM, STSC, COCA, and MDIA students. LEARNING HOURS    120 (36L;24Lb;24O;36P)

Instructor: I. Robinson


FILM 240/3.0/Fall                             Media and Popular Culture

Course surveys a variety of popular media forms and genres (film, TV, radio, music, novels, magazines, advertising, news, Internet). Introduces contemporary cultural studies analysis concerning the impact of everyday media use on the formation of identities, perceptions, lifestyles and communities. NOTE    Also offered online. Consult Arts and Science Online. Learning Hours may vary. NOTE    Priority will be given to FILM, STSC, COCA, and MDIA students. LEARNING HOURS    108(36L;36PS;36O)

Instructor: P. Gauthier


FILM 250/6.0/Fall/Winter                     Fundamentals of Media Production

This course provides a grounding in basic media production concepts and techniques, including scripting, directing, camerawork, sound, and post production. It is structured around a series of short production exercises, completed by small groups of students. Each student will produce or direct a short media project in the Winter Term.

 NOTE    Production supplies $250. Priority will be given to students with the highest overall GPA on FILM courses, including those at the 100‐level. NOTE    Students may enroll in no more than one production course per academic year: FILM 250/6.0; FILM 351/3.0; FILM 352/3.0; FILM 353/3.0; FILM 355/6.0; FILM 356/3.0; FILM 365/6.0; FILM 375/6.0; FILM 385/6.0; FILM 410/3.0; FILM 451/3.0. LEARNING HOURS    216 (48L;24Lb;60G;24O;60P) PREREQUISITE    Registration in a FILM Major or Medial Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization.

Instructors: E. Pelstring/ C. Mackey


FILM 260/3.0/Summer                       Digital Media Theory and Practice

Survey of digital media theories and online mass communication practices, with emphasis on social and mobile technologies. Course considers the impact of digitalization on the creative and culture industries. NOTE    Only offered online. Consult Arts and Science Online. LEARNING HOURS    120 (72O;48P)

Instructor: TBA


FILM 300/3.0/Fall                      Hollywood: The Dream Factory

This course examines Classical Hollywood Cinema from the emergence of sound and the studio system until its demise at the end of the 1950s. In 2017/2018, we will examine the history of Classical Hollywood Cinema through the prism on the Motion Picture Production Code, concentrating on the Studio System, genre, gender, and politics in the USA from 1930-1960. Genres include film noir, the melodrama, the musical, the Western, the horror film, the screwball comedy, and animation.. NOTE    Also offered online. Consult Arts and Science Online. Learning Hours may vary. NOTE    Priority will be given to FILM, STSC, COCA, and MDIA students. LEARNING HOURS    108 (36L;24Lb;48P) PREREQUISITE    (Registration in a FILM Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization) or (FILM 236/3.0; FILM 240/3.0; FILM 260/3.0).

Instructor: S. MacKenzie


FILM 302/3.0/Winter                       Genre  - Horror

Intermediate examination of generic convention, iconography, relations to modes of production and to audience, and historical dimensions, using as examples films or video productions in one or more genre.

For Winter 2018 this course will examine the intermediate examination of American horror cinema ranging from Tod Browning's Dracula (1931) to Jordan Peele's Get Out (2017). Focus will be placed on the evolution of generic conventions as informed by changing historical dimensions, alternative modes of production, and audience reception. Textual investigations will be further strengthened by a supporting exploration of horror film studies.

LEARNING HOURS    108 (36L;24Lb;48P) PREREQUISITE    Registration in a FILM Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and 12.0 units in FILM.

Instructor: D. Vena


FILM 303/3.0/Fall                    Transnational Cinemas

This course offers an overview of recent filmmaking practices from various continents. Transnational cinemas explore how intimate, personal styles of filmmaking converge with theories of globalization, hybridity and remediation. NOTE    Also offered online. Consult Arts and Science Online. Learning Hours may vary. NOTE    Priority will be given to FILM, STSC, COCA, and MDIA students. LEARNING HOURS    108 (36L;24Lb;48P) PREREQUISITE    (Registration in a FILM Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization) or (FILM 236/3.0; FILM 240/3.0; FILM 260/3.0) or (LLCU 209/3.0; DEVS 240/3.0) or permission of the Department.  

Instructor: K. Bertrand 


FILM 304/3.0/Winter                        Creative Industries in the 21st Century

Students will study the creative industries in global context. Course includes theoretical readings, field trips, guest lectures, and creative assignments to understand contemporary creative economies. NOTE    Students may be required to participate in a field trip in certain years. Estimated cost for bus and event admission is $70 plus accommodation and food. See departmental webpage for more information. LEARNING HOURS    108 (36L;24Oc;48P) PREREQUISITE    Registration in a FILM Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and 12.0 units in FILM.

Instructor: K. Zaiontz


DEVS 305/6.0                         Cuban Culture and Society

This course is designed to introduce students to Cuban society and culture. The course will focus especially on the period from the Cuban revolution (1959) to the present. Students will examine some of the main events and highlights of Cuban history, politics and culture in this era. Two weeks of this four‐week intensive course will take place at Queen’s and two weeks at the University of Havana. NOTES    1    Students are expected to pay an ancillary fee for travel and accommodation while in Havana. Estimated cost $2785.00.

2    Students must apply to take the course. Applications are available in the DEVS office.

3    Students are expected to attend a pre‐departure orientation. 4    Costs and application deadlines will be posted on the DEVS website. PREREQUISITE    Level 3 or above and registration in any Arts and Science Plan.

Instructors: S. Lord/ F. Monasterio


FILM 307/3.0                                Classics of European Cinema

Intermediate study of some of the most significant films made in Europe from the early 20th century to today. Considers historical, technological, and aesthetic determinants and influence. NOTE    Offered only at the Bader International Study Centre, Herstmonceux. LEARNING HOURS    108 (36L;24Lb;48P) PREREQUISITE    Registration in a FILM Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and 12.0 units in FILM.


STSC 309/3.0/Winter                        Special Topics in Stage and Screen: Playing With History

A seminar or workshop in selected areas of the curriculum in DRAM and FILM. PREREQUISITE   Level 3 in a DRAM, FILM, or STSC Plan, or permission of the Dan School of Drama and Music and the Department of Film and Media.

In 2017-18, this course will focus on how to use theatre and video as research tools to create a multi-media performance. At a time when the Indigenous peoples are stepping forward to reclaim who and what they are we will explore what this country and its real history means to you. Each student will be responsible for researching and then embodying one of their ancestors, as well as working in groups to research and present the untold stories behind important moments in the history of this land.

We will use a variety of techniques - popular theatre, community arts, clown, bouffon, guerrilla video, archival documents, old photos, documentary footage, music, song, and performance art - to create a final outcome that will reflect what you have discovered about yourselves, your family, and the country we live in.

Instructor: L. Spry


IDIS 311/3.0/Fall                                                    Sound Production

A production class exploring the formal concepts, historical underpinnings, and technical tools used in the production of independent sound works, or in the production of more elaborate sound components for video, film or theatrical projects. NOTE     Administered by the School of Music. PREREQUISITE    Level 3 or above.

Instructor: M. Rogalsky


FILM 312/3.0 /Fall and Winter                 Screenwriting

Approaches to dramatic storytelling for the screen. Students analyze examples from existing works and, through practical exercises, prepare a short, original screenplay. LEARNING HOURS    108 (36S;72P) PREREQUISITE    Registration in a FILM Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and 12.0 units in FILM.

Instructor: F. Leeming


FILM 315/3.0/Winter             Communication Technologies and Creative Practice

Intermediate study in the evolution of digital visual communications theory and practice. Covers readings about social and technological developments in computer mediated communication, and involves creative investigation of interactive digital media through design projects. LEARNING HOURS    108 (36L;24Lb;48P) PREREQUISITE    Registration in a FILM Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and 12.0 units in FILM.    

Instructor: E. Pelstring


FILM 320/3.0/Winter                  Media and the Arts

Intermediate study in relations between moving‐image media and other visual or performing arts. NOTE    Priority will be given to FILM, STSC, COCA, and MDIA students. LEARNING HOURS    108 (36L;24Lb;48P) PREREQUISITE    (Registration in a FILM Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and 12.0 units in FILM) or (FILM 236/3.0; FILM 240/3.0; FILM 260/3.0).

Instructor: J. Jelinsky


FILM 331/3.0/Fall                   Women and Film

Intermediate study in feminist approaches to the cinema and to films produced by women. Critical examination of critical and theoretical literature, and examples of narrative, documentary, and experimental cinemas. LEARNING HOURS    108 (36L;24Lb;48P) PREREQUISITE    (Registration in a FILM Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and 12.0 units in FILM) or (Level 3 and registration in a GNDS Plan and GNDS 120/3.0, GNDS 125/3.0).

Instructor: D. Vena


FILM 335/3.0/Fall                   Culture and Technology

Research and studies in relations of media, technology, and culture. Critical examination of cultural and communication technologies and the employment of technology within selected examples from film, television, and digital media. NOTE    Also offered online. Consult Arts and Science Online. Learning Hours may vary. NOTE    Priority will be given to FILM, STSC, COCA, and MDIA students. LEARNING HOURS    108 (36L;24O;48P) PREREQUISITE    (Registration in a FILM Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and 12.0 units in FILM) or (FILM 236/3.0; FILM 240/3.0; FILM 260/3.0).

Instructor: J. Chan


FILM 336/3.0/Winter                    Film and Politics

Intermediate examination of the historical and critical relation between film and politics or political ideologies. Examples will be drawn from both narrative and non‐narrative traditions. LEARNING HOURS    108 (36L;24Lb;48P) PREREQUISITE    Registration in a FILM Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and 12.0 units in FILM.

Instructor: L. Klassen


FILM 337/3.0                           Cinema and the City

An intermediate study of representations of the city in cinema and visual culture, the social histories from which these representations emerge, and the changing environments in which cinema is viewed. NOTE    Only offered at the Bader International Studies Centre, Herstmonceux. Learning Hours may vary. LEARNING HOURS    108 (36L;24Lb;48P) PREREQUISITE    (Registration in a FILM Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and 12.0 units in FILM) or (Level 3 and registration in a GPHY Plan and GPHY 101/3.0, GPHY 227/3.0, GPHY 229/3.0).


FILM 338/3.0/Winter                Contemporary Issues in Cultural Studies

An intermediate study of key concepts in cultural studies investigated through cultural practices and/or national contexts from the 1960s to the present. NOTE    Students will be required to attend a limited number of Kingston‐based cultural productions over the course of the term. NOTE    Priority will be given to FILM, STSC, COCA, and MDIA students. LEARNING HOURS    120 (36L;12G;12Oc;60P) PREREQUISITE    (Registration in a FILM Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and 12.0 units in FILM) or (FILM 236/3.0; FILM 240/3.0; FILM 260/3.0) or (Level 3 and registration in an ARTH, ARTV, DRAM, or MUSC Plan).

Instructor: K. Zaiontz


STSC 339/3.0/Fall                                      Media and Performance

Historically, media has played a key role in producing and circulating social knowledge as well as fostering people’s senses of belonging and empowerment. Throughout this course, students will explore how media practices as a form of “embodied performance” could engender new creative space for intervention in a post-industrial and neoliberal age. Situated in historical and/or transnational contexts, various case studies examine how media and performance intersect, and how each shapes the other. 

NOTE    Students will be required to attend a limited number of Kingston‐based cultural productions over the course of the term. LEARNING HOURS    120 (36L;12G;12Oc;60P) PREREQUISITE    Level 3 and registration in an ARTHARTV, DRAM, FILM, MUSC or STSC Plan.

Instructor: T. Zhang


FILM 340/3.0/Winter                       Advertising and Consumer Culture

This course examines the role played by advertising in consumer culture from the mid- 20th century to the present. While advertising is often seen as pervasive and homogenizing, our understanding of the relationship between this mode of communication and our experience of our world, and other parts of the world, is often superficial. To redress this elision, this course examines the way in which advertising functions as a dominant trope of our culture, mediating the ways in which we understand not only ‘goods’ and ‘products’ as commodities, but also politics, sexuality, identity and globalization. Drawing on writings from communications, sociology, media studies, cultural studies, global studies, and political science, the courses traces the many tentacles of advertising and the way in which they pervade our everyday life.

It is often easy to “see through” advertisements of other eras and marvel at the simplicity of their message. In order to better understand the role played by advertising in contemporary culture, we will begin by examining what kinds of consumption are important to us, how are own views of the world (what we watch, what we buy, what we eat, how we look, how we vote) are shaped by advertisements, and consider the ways in which we define our own selves through consumption.

By using print media and television as our key cultural objects (but also paying some attention to film, popular music and the internet) we will explore the question as to what extent advertisements and consumerist practices construct the world in which we live. We will do so by asking questions such as: can one only buy objects, or can one also buy looks and lifestyles? Are all attacks on consumer culture (punk, parody, culture jamming) doomed to recuperation? In an age of rampant consumerism, how can one address and understand concepts like ‘authenticity’?

NOTE    Also offered online. Consult Arts and Science Online. Learning hours may vary. NOTE    Assignments include online and on‐campus exams, online discussion forum participation requirement, short reflective essays, and some creative design work. LEARNING HOURS    108 (36L;36O;36P) PREREQUISITE    (Registration in a FILM Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and 12.0 units in FILM) or (FILM 236/3.0; FILM 240/3.0; FILM 260/3.0) or (COMM 131/3.0 or COMM 231/3.0 or PSYC 342/3.0).

Instructor: I. Robinson


FILM 345/3.0/Fall                    Television: Structure and Function

Intermediate examination of television and the development of the medium as a distinctive cultural form, through a range of programs and programming formats, issues of audience, and television broadcasting in Canada. LEARNING HOURS    108 (36L;24Lb;48P) PREREQUISITE    Registration in a FILM Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and 12.0 units in FILM.

Instructor: M. Smith


FILM 351/3.0/Winter                     Documentary Production

Advanced motion picture production course. Each student produces a short documentary using video and/or 16mm film. Emphasis will be placed on unconventional approaches and techniques. NOTE    Students may enroll in no more than one production course per academic year: FILM 250/6.0; FILM 351/3.0; FILM 352/3.0; FILM 353/3.0; FILM 355/6.0; FILM 356/3.0; FILM 365/6.0; FILM 375/6.0; FILM 385/6.0; FILM 410/3.0; FILM 451/3.0. LEARNING HOURS    120 (36L;24Lb;30G;30P) PREREQUISITE    Registration in a FILM Major or Medial Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and FILM 250/6.0 and 6.0 units in FILM. EXCLUSION    No more than one course from FILM 351/3.0; FILM 355/6.0.

Instructor: C. Berggold


FILM 352/3.0/Winter                 Production: Issues of Form and Structure

Advanced practical course in film and video aesthetics. Starting with the screening and analysis of selected works, each student will script, produce and edit a short video or 16mm work that explores particular formal questions. Emphasis will be placed on unconventional approaches and techniques. NOTE    Students may enroll in no more than one production course per academic year: FILM 250/6.0; FILM 351/3.0; FILM 352/3.0; FILM 353/3.0; FILM 355/6.0; FILM 356/3.0; FILM 365/6.0; FILM 375/6.0; FILM 385/6.0; FILM 410/3.0; FILM 451/3.0. LEARNING HOURS    120 (36L;24Lb;60P) PREREQUISITE    Registration in a FILM Major or Medial Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and FILM 250/6.0 and 6.0 units in FILM.

Instructor: G. Kibbins


FILM 353/3.0 /Fall                               Narrative Production

An advanced course on the conception, planning, shooting and editing of narrative film and television. Working alone or in groups of two, students will produce short, professional quality videos that will form segments of a collaborative class project to be screened in public at the end of term.

An advanced course on the conception, planning, shooting, and editing of narrative film and television. Working in groups of four, students will produce short, professional quality videos (maximum length eight minutes) for a public screening. NOTE    Students may enroll in no more than one production course per academic year: FILM 250/6.0; FILM 351/3.0; FILM 352/3.0; FILM 353/3.0; FILM 355/6.0; FILM 356/3.0; FILM 365/6.0; FILM 375/6.0; FILM 385/6.0; FILM 410/3.0; FILM 451/3.0. LEARNING HOURS    120 (36L;24Lb;30G;30P) PREREQUISITE    Registration in a FILM Major or Medial Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and FILM 250/6.0 and 6.0 units in FILM. EXCLUSION    No more than one course from FILM 353/3.0; FILM 365/6.0.    

Instructor: C. Mackey


FILM 356/3.0/Fall                                    Animation Production

A combined study of the history and theory of film animation with the production of animated films. Requirements will include both research essays as well as the conceptualization and production of an animated film. NOTE    Students may enroll in no more than one production course per academic year: FILM 250/6.0; FILM 351/3.0; FILM 352/3.0; FILM 353/3.0; FILM 355/6.0; FILM 356/3.0; FILM 365/6.0; FILM 375/6.0; FILM 385/6.0; FILM 410/3.0; FILM 451/3.0. LEARNING HOURS   120 (36L;24Lb;60P) PREREQUISITE   Registration in a FILM Major or Medial Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and FILM 250/6.0 and 6.0 units in FILM. EXCLUSION   No more than one course from FILM 356/3.0; FILM 385/6.0.

Instructor: F. Leeming


FILM 368/3.0/Winter                     Animation Theory and Criticism

A course on the history, theory, and practice of animated films. Requirements include a series of screenings, writings, and a practice based critical project. LEARNING HOURS    108 (36L;12Oc;60P) PREREQUISITE    Registration in a FILM Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and 12.0 units in FILM. EXCLUSION    No more than one course from FILM 368/3.0; FILM 385/6.0.

Instructor: F. Leeming


FILM 370/3.0/Fall                                The Experimental Tradition

Intermediate critical and historical study in the avant‐garde of the international cinema, based on selected examples principally from Europe, the United States and Canada. LEARNING HOURS    108 (36L;24Lb;48P) PREREQUISITE    Registration in a FILM Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and 12.0 units in FILM. EXCLUSION    No more than one course from FILM 370/3.0; FILM 375/6.0.

Instructor: G. Kibbins


FILM 395/3.0                                Internship

Students can apply to undertake a practical internship in media production, criticism or curatorship. All internships must be approved in advance by application to the Undergraduate Coordinator. Approval will depend on the quality of the proposal and the academic record of the applicant. Students are required to write a report about their experience and are evaluated jointly by their employer and a faculty member from Film and Media. It is the responsibility of students, not the Department of Film and Media, to arrange internships. NOTE    Students will be given a grade of Pass/Fail for work done. LEARNING HOURS    120 (120I) PREREQUISITE    Registration in a FILM Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and 12.0 units in FILM and permission of the Department.

Contact Undergraduate Chair: S. MacKenzie


FILM 410/3.0/Fall                     Video Production for Digital Media

Creative investigation of media, culture, and technology, focused through the medium of video from its invention to its current digital forms. Practical experiments will be guided by critical texts and case studies that contextualize video‐based practices in a variety of fields. NOTE    Students may enroll in no more than one production course per academic year: FILM 250/6.0; FILM 351/3.0; FILM 352/3.0; FILM 353/3.0; FILM 355/6.0; FILM 356/3.0; FILM 365/6.0; FILM 375/6.0; FILM 385/6.0; FILM 410/3.0; FILM 451/3.0. LEARNING HOURS    120 (36L;24Lb;60P) PREREQUISITE    Registration in a FILM Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and FILM 250/6.0 and 24.0 units in FILM.

Instructor: E. Pelstring


IDIS 410/6.0/Fall                                Contemporary Cultural Performance in Practice

A practical course based in the practices of SpiderWebShow (www.spiderwebshow.ca), that interrogates how online and digital technologies are converging with live performance. Students will experience the creative process behind creating  a professional work with the emerging virtual performance technology CdnStudio (cdnstudio.ca) working towards creating their own virtual performances. The course will also engage with the lecture and performance series Informing Content – with students to engaging with social media and performance over the October 20-22 weekend.

Enrolment is limited. NOTE     Administered by the Department of Film and Media. LEARNING HOURS    228 (36Pc;96G;96P) PREREQUISITE    Level 4 in a FILM, ARTF, DRAM or MUSC Plan.

Instructor: M. Wheeler


FILM 430/3.0/Winter                            Authorship: Special Topic

Advanced seminar on cinema authorship.Orson Welles’s Citizen Kane and Nicholas Ray’s Rebel Without a Cause are two cornerstones of US cinema in the studio era.  Over seven decades, these two artists followed parallel paths, from their Wisconsin childhoods, through theatre and radio, to Hollywood and beyond, and yet their work was individually distinctive and, to varying degrees, distinguished.  Through discussion of a selection of films and readings by and about the two directors, this course examines Welles and Ray and their work in the frames of personal, professional, and cultural history.  

LEARNING HOURS    108 (36L;24Lb;48P) PREREQUISITE    Registration in a FILM Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and 30.0 units in FILM or permission of the Department. EXCLUSION    No more than one course from FILM 400/3.0‐001 (2014 onward); FILM 430/3.0.

Instructor: B. Allan


FILM 435/3.0/Fall                       Culture and Representation: Special Topic

This course  is a journey into Indigenous and Inuit Women’s film, videography and contemporary media projects. Inspired by the amazing works of strong and dedicated Indigenous women from the Americas and from Australia, FILM 400 will explore such topics as indigenous methodologies and aesthetics, indigenous feminism, decolonization, self recognition, survivance, language revitalization and cultural reappropriation. In these particular times where Indigenous and other minority women are facing some of their biggest challenges, media, film and videography become tools that are used to tell stories, bring together communities, heal individuals and empower the women who are putting their imprint on the medium. This course will favour an approach directly inspired by indigenous methodologies, where research is considered to be relational at its core, thus encouraging the students to connect thoughts, images, voices and processes.

 LEARNING HOURS    108 (36L;24Lb;48P) PREREQUISITE    Registration in a FILM Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and 30.0 units in FILM or permission of the Department. EXCLUSION    No more than one course from FILM 400/3.0‐003 (2014 onward); FILM 435/3.0.

Instructor: K. Bertrand


FILM 440/3.0/Winter                             Non‐narrative Film: Special Topic

In 2017-2018: “Self-Reflexive Documentaries.” Drawing on works from the history of global cinema and media, we will consider the ways in which filmmakers place their own modes of production and political and personal subjectivity at the forefront of the ethics of their documentary film and media practices. We will examine short and feature works by film- and media-makers including (but not limited to): Tim Asch and Napoleon Chagnon; Humaira Bilkis; Luis Buñuel; Shirley Clarke; Guy Debord; Su Friedrich; John Greyson; Mohsen Makhmalbaf; Chris Marker; Albert and David Maysles and Charlotte Zwerin; Errol Morris; Michael Moore; Laura Mulvey and Peter Wollen; Pierre Perrault; Yvonne Rainer; Michael Rubbo; Liselotte Wajstedt; Peter Watkins; Orson Welles; Wim Wenders; Agnès Varda; and Dziga Vertov. LEARNING HOURS    108 (36L;24Lb;48P) PREREQUISITE    Registration in a FILM Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and 30.0 units in FILM or permission of the Department. EXCLUSION    No more than one course from FILM 400/3.0‐005 (2014 onward); FILM 440/3.0.

Instructor:  S. MacKenzie


FILM 450/3.0/Winter                           The Business of Media

A 12‐week course that serves as a general primer on the current business of media in Canada as it pertains to narrative storytelling. Students explore business considerations throughout the production cycle, from development to production to distribution and marketing, as well as examine various different career paths in media. LEARNING HOURS    108 (36L;24Oc;48P) PREREQUISITE    Registration in a FILM Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and FILM 250/6.0 and 24.0 units in FILM or permission of the Department.

Instructor: A. Jansen


FILM 460/6.0/Fall/Winter                                        Major Project

Seminar that draws on students' previous work to enhance advanced research, production and writing for final project in creative writing, criticism, journalism, production and/or curating and programming film, media, and digital culture.  Topics from theory, criticism, and history of film, media, digital culture, film festivals, media arts exhibitions and museums will be addressed to suit individuals. Examples from narrative, documentary, experimental film or digital media art will be analyzed. Student projects will be published online and/or exhibited at the new Isabel Bader Centre for the Performing Arts. NOTE    Open to FILM Major or Medial, STSC, and COCA students only. NOTE    Students may enroll in no more than one production course per academic year: FILM 351/3.0; FILM 352/3.0; FILM 355/6.0; FILM 365/6.0; FILM 375/6.0; FILM 385/6.0; FILM 410/3.0; FILM 451/3.0; FILM 460/6.0.   LEARNING HOURS    228 (36L;36G;36O;120Oc) PREREQUISITE   Registration in a FILM Major or Medial Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and 30.0 units in FILM or permission of the Department.

Instructors: F. Leeming/ S. MacKenzie


FILM 500/6.0    Honours Thesis

Open to students completing an honours concentration in Film and Media, or Stage and Screen Studies. May be an essay or a film or video project. Apply for FILM 500/6.0 or FILM 501/3.0, but not both, to the Undergraduate Coordinator by end of Level 3. NOTE    To use Film and Media video equipment the student must have completed FILM 250/6.0. PREREQUISITE    Registration in a FILM Major or Medial Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and 30.0 units in FILM or permission of the Department.


FILM 501/3.0    Honours Thesis

Open to students completing an honours concentration in Film and Media, or Stage and Screen Studies. May be an essay or a film or video project. Apply for FILM 500/6.0 or FILM 501/3.0, but not both, to the Undergraduate Coordinator by end of Level 3. NOTE    To use Film and Media video equipment the student must have completed FILM 250/6.0. PREREQUISITE    Registration in a FILM Major or Medial Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and 30.0 units in FILM or permission of the Department.


FILM 510/6.0    Directed Studies

Open to students completing an honours concentration in Film and Media, or Stage and Screen Studies. Enables a student to pursue an area of study not covered in regularly offered courses. Applicants must obtain approval of the Undergraduate Coordinator and supervising instructor. NOTE    To use Film and Media video equipment the student must have completed FILM 250/6.0. PREREQUISITE    Registration in a FILM Major or Medial Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and 30.0 units in FILM or permission of the Department.


FILM 511/3.0    Directed Studies

Open to students completing an honours concentration in Film and Media, or Stage and Screen Studies. Enables a student to pursue an area of study not covered in regularly offered courses. Applicants must obtain approval of the Undergraduate Coordinator and supervising instructor. NOTE    To use Film and Media video equipment the student must have completed FILM 250/6.0. PREREQUISITE    Registration in a FILM Major or Medial Plan, STSC or COCA Specialization and 30.0 units in FILM or permission of the Department.


 

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