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Finding a muse in research

  • First Prize -Tulugak on the Crucifix - Pond Inlet, Nunavut, Norman Vorano (Art History & Art Conservation): Dr. Vorano was conducting historical research with Inuit elders in Nunavut in 2016. After one session, he stepped outside. The white sky was indistinguishable from the ground. He walked past a towering crucifix erected behind the Catholic Church, on an imposing hill overlooking the community. A raven flew down from the ethereal sky, perched on the Crucifix, and began vocalizing.
    First Prize -Tulugak on the Crucifix - Pond Inlet, Nunavut, Norman Vorano (Art History & Art Conservation): Dr. Vorano was conducting historical research with Inuit elders in Nunavut in 2016. After one session, he stepped outside. The white sky was indistinguishable from the ground. He walked past a towering crucifix erected behind the Catholic Church, on an imposing hill overlooking the community. A raven flew down from the ethereal sky, perched on the Crucifix, and began vocalizing.
  • Second Prize - Window on a Window to the Universe - SNOLAB, Sudbury, Mark Chen (Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy): An underwater camera mounted in the SNO+ neutrino detector captures a snapshot image when the 12-m diameter acrylic sphere is 85% full. Viewed from below, ropes are seen crisscrossing the top of the sphere extending down, and each of the shiny cells that are visible is a 20-cm diameter super-sensitive light detector.
    Second Prize - Window on a Window to the Universe - SNOLAB, Sudbury, Mark Chen (Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy): An underwater camera mounted in the SNO+ neutrino detector captures a snapshot image when the 12-m diameter acrylic sphere is 85% full. Viewed from below, ropes are seen crisscrossing the top of the sphere extending down, and each of the shiny cells that are visible is a 20-cm diameter super-sensitive light detector.
  • Third Prize - Aldonza - Weston Playhouse, Tim Fort (Dan School of Drama & Music): This moment arrives at the end of the staging for the musical number 'Aldonza' from 'The Man of La Mancha' – one of two musicals Dr. Fort directed at the Weston Playhouse this summer. Many of the show's creative team are Broadway vets, including the designer and the performer playing Aldonza – whose character is pictured ignoring the aggressions of the muleteers as they sing in this musical version of the Don Quixote story.
    Third Prize - Aldonza - Weston Playhouse, Tim Fort (Dan School of Drama & Music): This moment arrives at the end of the staging for the musical number 'Aldonza' from 'The Man of La Mancha' – one of two musicals Dr. Fort directed at the Weston Playhouse this summer. Many of the show's creative team are Broadway vets, including the designer and the performer playing Aldonza – whose character is pictured ignoring the aggressions of the muleteers as they sing in this musical version of the Don Quixote story.
  • Honourable Mention - Amphibian from the Inside - Zeiss stereomicroscope, Rute Clemente Carvalho (Postdoc, Biology): The evolutionary process called miniaturization can lead to morphological changes in body structures. Using a special staining technique, this froglet, with a body size of around 18mm, features like osteoderms in the skin and hyperossification on the skeleton can be observed.
    Honourable Mention - Amphibian from the Inside - Zeiss stereomicroscope, Rute Clemente Carvalho (Postdoc, Biology): The evolutionary process called miniaturization can lead to morphological changes in body structures. Using a special staining technique, this froglet, with a body size of around 18mm, features like osteoderms in the skin and hyperossification on the skeleton can be observed.
  • Shortlisted - Evelyn Mitchell and her ‘Burler’ – Kingston, Laura Murray (English and Cultural Studies): Through oral history and archival research the Swamp Ward and Inner Harbour History Project is revealing the 20th Century history of two of the oldest neighborhoods in Kingston. Evelyn Mitchell worked at Hield Brothers Woolen Mill in the 1950s. Here she displays the tool she used, a “burler,” which she has saved to this day.
    Shortlisted - Evelyn Mitchell and her ‘Burler’ – Kingston, Laura Murray (English and Cultural Studies): Through oral history and archival research the Swamp Ward and Inner Harbour History Project is revealing the 20th Century history of two of the oldest neighborhoods in Kingston. Evelyn Mitchell worked at Hield Brothers Woolen Mill in the 1950s. Here she displays the tool she used, a “burler,” which she has saved to this day.
  • Shortlisted - 5000m High Sunset in the Andes - Lake Sibinacocha, Peru, Chris Grooms (Staff, Biology): Lake Sibinacocha is the 22nd-highest lake in the world. Storms from the Amazon push up over the mountains, depositing snow on icecaps feeding high elevation lakes. Andean societies are among the most vulnerable to the impacts of climatic change on freshwater systems.
    Shortlisted - 5000m High Sunset in the Andes - Lake Sibinacocha, Peru, Chris Grooms (Staff, Biology): Lake Sibinacocha is the 22nd-highest lake in the world. Storms from the Amazon push up over the mountains, depositing snow on icecaps feeding high elevation lakes. Andean societies are among the most vulnerable to the impacts of climatic change on freshwater systems.
  • Shortlisted - Phantasie Ist Alles - Museum Island, Berlin, Julia Partington (Undergraduate Student, English): I was fascinated by this piece of graffiti that I found on Museum Island in Berlin. Translated into English, it says, “Imagination is everything, it is the preview to the coming events of life.” This was said by Albert Einstein, and while his discipline is physics, different from mine, we both see the beauty of creativity.
    Shortlisted - Phantasie Ist Alles - Museum Island, Berlin, Julia Partington (Undergraduate Student, English): I was fascinated by this piece of graffiti that I found on Museum Island in Berlin. Translated into English, it says, “Imagination is everything, it is the preview to the coming events of life.” This was said by Albert Einstein, and while his discipline is physics, different from mine, we both see the beauty of creativity.
  • Shortlisted – "Non-wetting" Water - Chernoff Hall, Timothy Hutama (Master’s student, Chemistry): This drop sits on a super-hydrophobic surface that is unable to become wet because its affinity to water is less than what water has for itself. Therefore, water forms small, easily movable drops on the surface rather than a single puddle.
    Shortlisted – "Non-wetting" Water - Chernoff Hall, Timothy Hutama (Master’s student, Chemistry): This drop sits on a super-hydrophobic surface that is unable to become wet because its affinity to water is less than what water has for itself. Therefore, water forms small, easily movable drops on the surface rather than a single puddle.
  • Shortlisted – Magdalene - Church of Santa Maria della Vita, Bologna, Una D’Elia (Art History & Art Conservation): For over 550 years, the passionate Magdalene has been running with her veil streaming behind, screaming, to the body of Jesus, dead on the ground. This life-size statue, originally painted to mimic flesh and clothes, pushes the limits of the medium, terracotta.
    Shortlisted – Magdalene - Church of Santa Maria della Vita, Bologna, Una D’Elia (Art History & Art Conservation): For over 550 years, the passionate Magdalene has been running with her veil streaming behind, screaming, to the body of Jesus, dead on the ground. This life-size statue, originally painted to mimic flesh and clothes, pushes the limits of the medium, terracotta.
  • Shortlisted – Polypyrrole - Kingston University, UK, Danesh Roudini (BISC): The film morphology of electrochemically synthesized conducting polymers is widely dependent on electropolymerisation conditions. The SEM image shows electrochemically synthesized polypyrrole film on platinum electrode.
    Shortlisted – Polypyrrole - Kingston University, UK, Danesh Roudini (BISC): The film morphology of electrochemically synthesized conducting polymers is widely dependent on electropolymerisation conditions. The SEM image shows electrochemically synthesized polypyrrole film on platinum electrode.

Often, much of the research being done at Queen’s University is only seen by those involved in the project or who belong to the same department.

To help highlight some of the amazing work being done at Queen’s the Office of the Vice-Principal (Research) held the second annual Art of Research photo contest, calling on faculty, staff and students to showcase their research, scholarly and artistic work through photography.

Dozens of images were received highlighting research from art history and biology to physics and drama, and locations from the Arctic and the Andes Mountains to a retired woman’s home in Kingston.

“Once again we received tremendous support from researchers across disciplines who shared stimulating, provocative, and poignant images of their work” says Melinda Knox, Associate Director, Research Profile and Initiatives. “The winning submissions illustrate that research is not just about output: it is also an artistic and creative endeavor.”   

A panel of judges selected the first, second, honourable-mention winners, which are featured on the front page. 

See the Research website for the full story behind each photo.