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Honorary Degree: Arthur McDonald

  • Nobel Laureate and Professor Emeritus Arthur McDonald speaks at Grant Hall after receiving an honorary degree from Queen's University on Wednesday morning. (Photo by Bernard Clark)
    Nobel Laureate and Professor Emeritus Arthur McDonald speaks at Grant Hall after receiving an honorary degree from Queen's University on Wednesday morning. (Photo by Bernard Clark)
  • Art McDonald, third from left, stands alongside Rector Cam Yung, Principal Daniel Woolf, and Chancellor Jim Leech, after receiving an honorary degree from Queen's University on Wednesday. (Photo by Bernard Clark)
    Art McDonald, third from left, stands alongside Rector Cam Yung, Principal Daniel Woolf, and Chancellor Jim Leech, after receiving an honorary degree from Queen's University on Wednesday. (Photo by Bernard Clark)
  • Professor Emeritus and Nobel Laureate Arthur McDonald speaks with a graduate following Wednesday morning's convocation ceremony where he received an honorary degree. (Photo by Bernard Clark)
    Professor Emeritus and Nobel Laureate Arthur McDonald speaks with a graduate following Wednesday morning's convocation ceremony where he received an honorary degree. (Photo by Bernard Clark)
  • Professor Emeritus and Nobel Laureate Arthur McDonald waves as he waits to enter Grant Hall for a convocation ceremony on Wednesday morning where he received an honorary degree. (Photo by Bernard Clark)
    Professor Emeritus and Nobel Laureate Arthur McDonald waves as he waits to enter Grant Hall for a convocation ceremony on Wednesday morning where he received an honorary degree. (Photo by Bernard Clark)

Queen’s University recognized Nobel Laureate and Professor Emeritus Arthur McDonald with an honorary degree during Wednesday morning’s convocation ceremony.

A faculty member of the Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Dr. McDonald shared the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics for his longtime research and groundbreaking findings into neutrinos – sub-atomic particles considered the basic building blocks of the universe.

Dr. McDonald arrived at Queen’s in 1989 and was the inaugural Gordon and Patricia Gray Chair in Particle Astrophysics. He also was the co-recipient of the 2007 Benjamin Franklin Medal in Physics and the 2016 Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics.

He continues research on neutrinos and dark matter at the SNOLAB underground laboratory near Sudbury and is a member of the Board of Directors of the Perimeter Institute of Theoretical Physics.