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Standardized Patient program extends beyond campus

Queen's-based program uses actors to enhance training in the community.

The Kingston community will soon benefit from an expanded Queen’s University Standardized Patient and Objective Standardized Clinical Examination (SP&OSCE) program – a unique educational experience that uses actors to enhance training.

A  is an actor who is trained to portray the historical, emotional, and physical characteristics of a real person for educational purposes. This is done through simulated interviews and examinations. Standardized patients are also trained to provide feedback so students can gain insight into their strengths as well as areas requiring improvement. 

[Standardized Patient program]
Standardized patients go through a rigourous training program.

Started in 1992, the SP&OSCE Program has recruited and deployed more than 100 standardized patients in clinical skills, training and examinations for Faculty of Health Science students. Actors can take part in a variety of scenarios ranging from routine to emergent situations.

“For the past 25 years, Queen’s has run a successful standardized patient program catering to the Faculty of Health Sciences,” says Rebecca Snowdon, Community Outreach Coordinator. “Now we want to offer our services outside of the university to provide realistic, hands-on training to other departments, teams and organizations. We can provide a valuable service to the Kingston area with our standardized patients.”

Simulated learning provides a safe, yet realistic environment in which professionals from all fields can practice their skills. As the SP&OSCE program expands to the broader community, companies and organizations can hire actors to work in faculty development, dispute resolution, business, law enforcement, customer service, pharmacy, and physiotherapy.

“Standardized patients can be used in a wide range of applications outside of medicine. Over the past year we’ve been receiving an influx of bookings and requests from organization outside the university, it seemed a natural time to expand.  We’re excited to share the benefits of simulated learning,” says Kate Slagle, the SP&OSCE Program Manager.

The launch is set to begin this month with an open house at the Queen’s School of Medicine Clinical Teaching Centre on Monday, March 26 from 1 to 4 pm.  At the open house visitors will learn more about what the program has to offer, take a tour of the facility, and hear testimonials from those who have benefited from the program.

For more information visit the website.