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Gaels put on scoring display for Homecoming

Nelkas Kwemo makes an interception as the Queen's Gaels face the York Lions in Saturday's Homecoming football game at Richardson Stadium.
Nelkas Kwemo makes an interception as the Queen's Gaels face the York Lions in Saturday's Homecoming football game at Richardson Stadium.

A quick roundup of Gaels teams in action over the weekend:

FOOTBALL

The Queen's Gaels (3-4) defeated the York Lions (1-6) 52-34 at Richardson Stadium in front of a Homecoming crowd of 7,542 Tricolour faithful on Saturday afternoon.

After the York Lions picked up a pair of early points of punts through the endzone, the Gaels struck with quarterback Nate Hobbs connecting with Matteo Del Broccol for a 46-yard touchdown toss. Kicker Nick Liberatore converted and then added a field goal a few minutes later.

Queen’s kept rolling with interceptions by Wesley Mann and Nelkas Kwemo, and Hobbs found Del Brocco again after the second to give the Gaels a 17-2 lead in the first quarter.

York made a field goal but then the Gaels struck again with touchdowns for receiver Jeremy Pendergast and running back Jake Puskas. As the half wound down, Hobbs found Rudy Uhl for another major and the Lions added a touchdown of their own for a score of 40-13 at the break.

With the lead the Gaels held on in the second half with Puskas scoring another touchdown and Liberatore adding his third field goal of the day.

WOMEN’S RUGBY

The No. 8 Queen’s Gaels pulled off the 20-15 road upset over the No. 7 McMaster Marauders to advance to the OUA Championship next weekend. With the victory, the Gaels have also assured a spot at the national championship hosted by the Lethbridge Pronghorns.

Queen’s was able to get the jump on the Marauders quickly as strong tackling lead to a Pippi McKay try giving Queen's an early 5-0 lead. After McMaster was able to respond with a try of their own, Queen’s rookie sensation Sophie de Goede broke through for another try.

The Gaels widened the gap as Nadia Popov finished off a long sprint giving Queen’s a 15-5 lead at the half.

The home side came out strong in the second half with a try in the 45th. But Popov broke through for her second try of the night. McMaster added another try but the Gaels hung on to advance to the final where they will face the Guelph Gryphons.

MEN'S RUGBY

The undefeated Gaels (7-0) toppled the University of Varsity Blues (1-6) during Homecoming with a 78-0 victory.

The Gaels put on a show for the Homecoming crowd and scored in the first minute through Johnathan Ezer. Tries in the first half were scored by Evan Underwood, Gilad Miller, Patrick Lynott, and Dylan Young as the Gaels took a 47-0 lead into the break.

Stephen Lockhartscored an early try and was followed by multiple tries from Davin Killy and Dylan Young. 

WOMEN’S SOCCER

The Queen's Gaels (10-3-1) were victorious 6-2 in their final home game of regular season on Homecoming weekend against the RMC Paladins (0-14-0).

The Gaels honoured their eight graduating seniors prior to the match: Kyra Steer, Rachel Radu, Micah Vermeer, Savannah Meyer-Clement, Alicia Levy, Matija Skoko, Claudia Glasspoole and Laura Callender.

Queen’s scored early an often with a pair of goals in the first half from Jenny Wolever while Savannah Meyer-Clement and Matija Skoko also found the back of the net.

RMC struck back on the restart but Alexandra Doane and Laura Callender kept the Gaels ahead.

On Friday, the Gaels routed the Paladins at RMC 8-0. Six Gaels scored with Meyer-Clement and Doane each getting a pair. Solos went to Lidia Bradau, Jamie Foot, Sarah Nixon and Christie Gray.

MEN’S SOCCER

The Queen’s Gaels men's soccer team (6-5-3) were victorious 2-0 in a hard-fought home game against the RMC Paladins (0-11-3).

Prior to the match Queen’s honoured their graduating seniors Briam Jimenez-Lopez, Andrew Kim, Rory McParland, Patrick Van Belleghem, Tonko Bacelic and Jacob Schroeter.

In the 32nd minute, Christopher Meyer sent a header to the back of the net, scoring his first of the season.

After the half the Gaels put more pressure on the Paladins defence and continued to take shots on the RMC net. A late goal by Schroeter in the 87th minute the lead to 2-0 and solidified the win for Queen's.

On Friday, the Gaels beat the Trent Excalibur (3-6-4) 3-1 in Peterborough. Schroeter scored a pair of goals and Bacelic added another before the hosts added a late goal.

MEN’S HOCKEY

The Queen's Gaels (2-0-0) rounded out perfect opening weekend with a 4-0 win over the UOIT Ridgebacks (1-1-0). Jacob Brennan made 25 saves for the shutout.

Darcy Greenaway had a pair of goals and Damian Bourne and Luke Edwards also scored.

On Friday, the Gaels opened their season in style with a convincing 5-2 victory over the Laurentian Voyageurs (0-1-0).

After the visitors opened the scoring the Gaels struck back through Luke Bertolucci. But the Voyageurs added another for a 2-1 lead after the first.

Queen’s bounced back with goals from Slater Doggett and Brandon Prophet in the second period. Eric Ming stretched the lead to 4-2 in the third and Doggett added an empty-netter. Kevin Bailie made 27 saves for the win.

WOMEN’S HOCKEY

The Queens Gaels (1-0-0-0) started their season with a 2-1 win over the UOIT Ridgebacks (0-0-1-0) Saturday in Oshawa.

Kaylie Dennis opened the scoring for the Gaels in the first and the Ridgebacks evened the score in the second. Midway through the third Caroline DeBruin tapped home the winner.

BASEBALL

The Queen’s Gaels used a strong eight-inning performance by pitcher Jordan Herbison and a four-hit game by right-fielder Curt Smith to beat the Waterloo Warriors to claim the bronze medal at the 2017 OUA baseball championship.

Herbison, one of the top starters in the OUA during the regular season, surrendered only three runs on seven hits over eight innings. He constantly pitched ahead and attacked the zone and finished the day with nine strikeouts.

Queen’s scored three runs in the first inning on a bases loaded walk and back-to-back singles by Curt Smith and Joey Stipec. Kail Belowglowka drove in two on a towering double in the third, and Smith would drive in runs in both the fourth and sixth. 

After the Warriors scored three runs to close the gap in the fifth, Queen’s added runs in the sixth and seventh innings.

A warm welcome for alumni

  • Members of Sc’72 line up behind their banner on Saturday morning along University Avenue, including Stephen J.R. Smith, fourth from left, a strong financial supporter of Queen’s and its students. For his support, the university named the Smith School of Business in his honour. (University Communications)
    Members of Sc’72 line up behind their banner on Saturday morning along University Avenue, including Stephen J.R. Smith, fourth from left, a strong financial supporter of Queen’s and its students. For his support, the university named the Smith School of Business in his honour. (University Communications)
  • The Tricolour Guard – alumni who graduated 50 or more years ago – take part in the halftime parade during Saturday’s Homecoming football game at Richardson Stadium. (Photo by Michael Onesi)
    The Tricolour Guard – alumni who graduated 50 or more years ago – take part in the halftime parade during Saturday’s Homecoming football game at Richardson Stadium. (Photo by Michael Onesi)
  • Homecoming was a family celebration for University Council member Susan Lounsbury (Sc’82), who attended the Homecoming football game with husband Bruce Lounsbury (Sc’80) and son Patrick Lounsbury (Sc’07). (Photo by Michael Onesi)
    Homecoming was a family celebration for University Council member Susan Lounsbury (Sc’82), who attended the Homecoming football game with husband Bruce Lounsbury (Sc’80) and son Patrick Lounsbury (Sc’07). (Photo by Michael Onesi)
  • Alumni sign a chalkboard outside of Grant Hall before joining the parade to Richardson Stadium on Saturday morning. (University Communications)
    Alumni sign a chalkboard outside of Grant Hall before joining the parade to Richardson Stadium on Saturday morning. (University Communications)
  • Homecoming is a family affair for many alumni, including Stephen and Stephanie Taylor, who returned for their 25th reunion, and their daughter Victoria Taylor, who is in first year at Queen’s. (University Communications)
    Homecoming is a family affair for many alumni, including Stephen and Stephanie Taylor, who returned for their 25th reunion, and their daughter Victoria Taylor, who is in first year at Queen’s. (University Communications)
  • Returning alumni pose for an Instagram photo as they take part in some of the Homecoming activities on Saturday morning. (University Communications)
    Returning alumni pose for an Instagram photo as they take part in some of the Homecoming activities on Saturday morning. (University Communications)
  • Returning alumni were able to check in at Grant Hall over Homecoming weekend and gather information about their respective reunions and reconnect with former classmates and friends. (University Communications)
    Returning alumni were able to check in at Grant Hall over Homecoming weekend and gather information about their respective reunions and reconnect with former classmates and friends. (University Communications)
  • Three generations of the MacDonald family took part in Homecoming on Saturday. From left: Kathleen (MacDonald) Sangha, Atticus Sangha, and Lori MacDonald. (University Communications)
    Three generations of the MacDonald family took part in Homecoming on Saturday. From left: Kathleen (MacDonald) Sangha, Atticus Sangha, and Lori MacDonald. (University Communications)

Homecoming 2017 has come and gone but for thousands of returning alumni, the memories will last for years.

Countless hours of planning and preparations by Queen’s staff and volunteers went into organizing a wide range of events throughout the weekend, from class reunions, to conferences and galas, and the ReUnion Street Festival, which was headlined by musician Serena Ryder on Saturday night.

The Tricolour Guard – alumni who graduated 50 or more years ago – were once again celebrated and they led the way – along with volunteer reunion organizers – in the return of the halftime parade at the Homecoming football game.

The future of entrepreneurship at Queen’s

Greg Bavington (Sc’85), Executive Director of the Dunin-Deshpande Queen’s Innovation Centre. (Supplied Photo)

Greg Bavington (Sci’85) has signed on for a second five-year term as Executive Director of the Dunin-Deshpande Queen’s Innovation Centre (DDQIC), overseeing student and community entrepreneurship initiatives at Queen’s. The Gazette sat down with Mr. Bavington to learn more about him, and talk about plans for the term ahead.

 

Tell us how you came to be at Queen’s, and why you decided to renew for a second term.

“One of the first things I tell people is I am a bit of a misfit at a university. My background is very different from that of most people who work and teach at Queen’s. But one of the things I have noted in my career, and something which we teach our students in the DDQIC, is the importance and power of diversity on a team.

I spent 28 years in the private sector and I still have a foot in the private sector. The last 20 years of my career were spent in entrepreneurial roles, which requires a very different mindset than being an employee. When I exited my last company in 2012, I had planned to do a lot more cycling and sailing. But it happened to be just a couple of months before the first version of what is now called the Queen’s Innovation Centre Summer Initiative program was launching, and I was member of University Council at the time.

Then-Dean Woodhouse [of the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science] asked if I could spend some time that summer helping out. I knew I wanted to do something very different. By the end of the summer, I saw that nothing could be more different. All that change was great…and it also happened to be an institution that I had a lot of room for in my heart. I am a proud alumnus and I could see, as the summer went on, how somebody who is a bit of a misfit could be welcomed and supported and could help a lot by adding on to what Queen’s was already doing in terms of supporting entrepreneurs and innovators.”

 

Paint a picture for us of how far things have come in the last five years for Queen’s innovation and entrepreneurial efforts.

“The overarching feeling that first summer, in 2012, was that this was going to be the start of something big.

We realized our program and our goals had significant alignment with Queen’s overall strategy and priorities. One priority the university recognized was that it had to elevate its international importance. Another is that it had to elevate its research prominence – the visibility of the impact it makes on society through the research it does. The third theme was that it had to do a better job of supporting innovation and entrepreneurship, particularly but not exclusively student led. I suppose the fourth would be how Queen’s serves the community in which it sits – a social and economic development mandate.

We hit one of those themes in a very small way that first year in supporting student entrepreneurship. The last few years have been spent really building out those other themes. On the international side, we have launched our Global Network, incubated companies that have had an international impact or won international recognition, and we have just started turning our minds more seriously to social enterprise, [creating businesses which both make money and improve the community around them], both internationally and regionally.

 

What do you see in the coming five years? How will the DDQIC grow and change?

“The pillars I talked about are pretty durable. Sometimes a gigantic success creates a centre of excellence that is difficult to anticipate – like having a Research in Motion [now] Blackberry fall into the lap of your region which could completely shake up the innovation ecosystem. I predict it could happen in Kingston. I don’t dare predict which industry it would be in, but if it happened that would be something we would have to acknowledge and support. It could even start in our centre – there’s every chance it could.

Being adaptable is important because our centre has grown significantly. It becomes more of a challenge to remain adaptable as you grow. We have to embrace the growth while trying to stay nimble.

We also need to build out the social enterprise side of our offering. We do some of this already within our existing programs, but to do it really well, we need some dedicated or specialized effort. One of our team members is going to the Deshpande Foundation in India for three months this winter. That’s an institution that has knocked it out of the park in terms of scaling and making real economic and social impact with the projects they have executed on. We want to see how they have done it, learn about their successes and failures, and give some very careful thought about what is translatable to the Canadian situation. We know there are significant portions of Canadian society that have not fully participated in the success we call Canadian society. We have a lot to learn from places like India.

Our connection with scholarly research is a big theme going forward. We have to knit our various disciplines, connections, and research together more energetically and thoughtfully, ensuring that every piece of intellectual property that is generated at this place gets a serious looking-at by the people who can determine whether it is something that should be brought out into the light of day and tested by the market.”

 

It sounds like you enjoy change. Was there any hesitation in signing up for another term?

“There was no hesitation. If I reflect on my career, if I have switched seats or switched places it was probably because there was a lack of an ability or will to effect change. I am very excited by the will that the leadership at Queen’s and the broader community have demonstrated to enact change. After all, an old boss on mine used to say ‘Change is all that stands between us and perfection’.”

 

Anything you’re most proud of among the DDQIC’s achievements?

“I am most proud of Queen’s for recognizing that it needs to do this. Queen’s is a place that could coast on its reputation for a long time, and I am proud of Queen’s for not doing that. It has constantly pivoted and morphed and adapted to what society needed of it.

I am proud of the people I work with here. They will defy every unfortunate stereotype you hear about academia and universities. I am proud to be able to work with them and to work here.

There are people in every corner of this campus who have rolled up their sleeves and helped us out. That’s amazing. The success stories are great for teasing those people out of the woodwork, but you want those people there to support you when you have your failures too! The more those people come on board, the more this thing is just going to snowball into something big and great. We just need to be very careful not to lose our vision and our agility, and not lose our peripheral vision.”

Queen's United Way campaign surpasses halfway mark

Queen's United WayThe Queen’s United Way Campaign Committee has set a fundraising goal of $320,000 for this year’s campaign in support of United Way of Kingston, Frontenac Lennox and Addington.

To date, the campaign has reached $161,000, or just over 50 per cent of its goal.

Queen’s community members can back the United Way through payroll deduction, a one-time gift, credit card, cheque or cash. To make a donation online through the United Way’s ePledge system, simply go to queensu.ca/unitedway. Please note that if you donated last year and selected the auto-renewal action, no further action is required unless you would like to change your donation. 

More information on the campaign and the role of the Queen’s United Way Campaign Committee is available in this Gazette article.

Oct. 10 edition of the Gazette now available

The Oct. 10 edition of the Gazette is now available and can be picked up around Queen’s campus, as well as a number of off-campus locations.

"Oct. 10, 2017 edition of the Gazette"
Read the Oct. 10 edition of the Gazette online.

This latest edition of the Gazette is filled with interesting Queen’s-focused items including:

  • Photos and an article on the first football game played by the Queen’s Gaels under the lights at Richardson Stadium.
  • The announcement of the first Director of Indigenous Initiatives at Queen’s University.
  • An introduction to the four honorary degree recipients who will be recognized during Fall Convocation.
  • The launch of the annual fundraising campaign by Queen’s United Way.
  • ​Updates on the latest research, awards and achievements of faculty, staff and students.

The next edition of the Gazette will be published Oct. 24. However, new articles are posted daily at the Gazette Online.

Follow us on Twitter at @queensuGazette.

Anyone looking to get a story, photo or information in the Gazette can contact the paper's editor Andrew Carroll.

Maclean's ranks Queen's amongst top universities

"Students on campus during the fall term"
In the latest ranking by Maclean's magazine, Queen's has maintained its fourth place standing in the medical-doctoral universities category. (University Communications)

Queen’s held its position as one of Canada’s leading medical-doctoral universities according to the Maclean’s 2018 university rankings, placing fourth overall in the category.

Queen’s trailed only McGill University, the University of Toronto and the University of British Columbia in the category that includes 15 universities with a broad range of Ph.D. programs and research, as well as medical schools.

In the student satisfaction ranking Queen’s moved up one spot to second, placing in the top three in eight of the 10 categories. Queen’s led the way in terms of student life staff and extracurricular activities, and placed second in administrative staff, academic advising staff, residence life and bureaucracy (least red tape), as well as steps to prevent sexual assault.

“The results of the Maclean’s rankings speak to the quality of a Queen’s education,” says Principal Daniel Woolf. “In particular, I am pleased to note that Queen’s ranked second in the steps to prevent sexual assault category in the student satisfaction survey, which reflects the hard work and importance the university and Queen’s community has placed on making the university a safe and supportive environment for all students, staff and faculty.” 

Maclean’s also provided statistics that showed Queen’s is tops in the proportion of undergraduate students who graduate (89.5 per cent), second in student retention from first to second year (94.7 per cent), and fifth for average entering grade (89 per cent).

“The results of the Maclean’s rankings speak to the quality of a Queen’s education. In particular, I am pleased to note that Queen’s ranked second in the steps to prevent sexual assault category in the student satisfaction survey, which reflects the hard work and importance the university and Queen’s community has placed on making the university a safe and supportive environment for all students, staff and faculty.”                                                                                                                          – Principal Daniel Woolf

Queen’s had strong results in several other categories in the overall ranking, placing second in faculty awards and in scholarships and bursaries, while placing fourth in student awards and library expenses.

Queen’s placed eighth out of 49 universities in the national reputational ranking, which surveyed high school guidance counsellors and businesspeople as well as university faculty and senior administrators. In the three categories of the reputational ranking, Queen’s placed sixth for highest quality, eighth for most innovative, and 10th for leaders of tomorrow.

UCARE seeking applications

Queen’s is inviting members of the Queen’s community and Kingston community members to consider taking part in the University Council on Anti-Racism and Equity. UCARE is currently seeking to recruit three faculty members, three staff members, two students (including one undergraduate and one graduate or professional student), and two members of the Kingston community or alumni. 

Those interested in applying to join UCARE should complete an application prior to Oct. 22 at 11:59 pm. The final membership will be announced in November, and the council aims to hold its first meeting before the end of 2017. These meetings will be open to faculty, staff, and student guests who wish to attend as observers. The UCARE will maintain at least 51 per cent representation from racialized groups.

For more information, or to apply, please visit the UCARE webpage

Reconnecting through Homecoming

"Students help celebrate Homecoming"
Every year, Homecoming helps bring returning alumni together with current students at Queen’s through events aimed at renewing connections and fostering new friendships. (Photo by Lars Hagberg)

As only can be expected, when it comes to Homecoming at Queen’s, the thousands of alumni returning to campus will have no trouble filling their schedules or finding new ways to connect with the university.

Every year countless hours go into creating an experience to remember for alumni and at the hub of all this activity once again is Sarah Indewey, Associate Director, Alumni & Volunteer Relations in the Office of Advancement, and her dedicated team. On campus they are also working with faculties, schools, departments, student organizations and groups to make sure that they have the opportunity to highlight the activities they are working on and to present the current campus life to alumni.

Set for Oct. 13-15, Ms. Indewey says that alumni are calling on a daily basis to get the latest updates on Homecoming 2017.

“Alumni are returning from as soon as the Class of 2017 in Reunion-Zero to as far back as Shirley Purkis (Arts’41), who is celebrating her 76th reunion and there are about 3,000 people between those two extremes coming,” she says. “They are from all faculties, so it’s really a great opportunity to showcase current activity to alumni who were once part of that faculty, club or group.”

Connections between alumni and current students continue to grow through Homecoming and there are more activities than ever. New this year is the increased involvement of international students through a partnership with the Queen’s University International Centre (QUIC), while the Residence Society is offering tours of residence rooms to add to the nostalgia.

On Saturday night, the Alma Mater Society will once again be hosting the ReUnion Street Festival, which, Ms. Indewey points out, has become an integral component of Homecoming weekend. The event requires year-round planning and has helped develop strategic interactions with the AMS, as well as community partners such as the Kingston Police.

For Ms. Indewey, the work put in by students is particularly inspiring.

“Working with student leaders is probably my favourite part of the job, because it’s hard enough to think about classes and your own organization and engaging students, but they are also thinking about the people who used to do this, the alumni, and how we can continue to engage them and get them excited about the work we are doing now,” she says. 

Another big part of Homecoming are milestones and this year Math & Engineering is marking its 50th anniversary with a special conference, while the Tricolour Guard – alumni who graduated 50 or more years ago – will once again be filling Grant Hall and Ban Righ Hall with a reception and dinner. More than 400 have confirmed their attendance.

The Tricolour Guard will also be the focus of the alumni parade as it makes its return to the Homecoming football game at Richardson Stadium. A long-standing tradition, as the number of participants grew in recent years the parade had become too cumbersome, interfering with the running of the game itself. Last year, the first in the revitalized stadium, the event was not held. After hearing feedback, and recognizing the importance of celebrating alumni at halftime, a happy medium will see the parade return with the Tricoulour Guard being honoured, as well as the volunteers who have devoted their time to organizing class reunions. 

Another event of particular note, Ms. Indewey points out, is taking place on West Campus, as the Faculty of Education presents the MacClement Lecture, featuring Kevin Lamoureux who will be speaking on Reconciliation and Post-Secondary Education.

For information and schedules visit the Homecoming website (queensu.ca/alumni/homecoming).
Twitter users are encouraged to use the hashtag #QueensHomecoming.

National Cyber Security Awareness Month: Malware

Throughout October, Queen’s University is recognizing National Cyber Security Awareness Month.

At Queen’s, the goal of NCSAM is to increase awareness about cybersecurity while educating the campus community on ways to better protect your devices, networks, data, and personal information from cyber threats.

In support of the effort, the Gazette is publishing a series of informational articles focused on online threats and tips on how to maintain and improve cyber security at the university.

MALWARE

Are you at risk?"Malware Poster"

Malware, also known as "malicious software", consists of any program or file that is harmful to a user's device and/or data. It can also sit on your computer to be used be the hacker "in control" of the software. These files and programs can perform many functions, but are typically used to: 

  • Steal personal data; 
  • Alter core device functions; or 
  • Monitor your actions without your permission 
  • Malware can also lie dormant on a device until it is "triggered" by the desired action. 

How does this affect me?

Malware attacks are becoming increasingly difficult to identify. You can fall victim to malware by simply opening an email or visiting a website. A program can install from an email or website without warning or any action on your part. Just visiting a web page or opening a file is enough to cause the download to begin in the background, so you may not even be aware that you have malware on your system! 

If your system is infected with malware, your personal data, as well as that of all others on your network, is at risk. This includes banking information, passwords, files, and any other information that is stored on your device. 

How can I prevent malware? 

Backup your data! 

  • Creating regular backups of your data protects you from data loss and ensures that you retain important information even if your computer becomes infected. 
  • Be sure to create a backup on a drive that is not physically housed on your device’s hard drive, such as on an external drive or in a place like Microsoft OneDrive. 
  • Check to make sure you are using a Queen's secured method for backing up and sharing files.

Install an antivirus software on your devices.  

  • A reputable antivirus program helps to protect your device from incoming threats and identify current malware you might have on your system. Scanning regularly ensures your system is consistently protected. 
  • Handheld devices need anti-virus, too. 

Keep your operating system and all software current. 

  • Operating systems such as Windows and iOS are always providing updates and patches to fix potential security issues within the system. Ensuring that you install regularly scheduled updates helps protect your devices from known threats. 
  • Don't forget to update your internet browsers as well! Patches are often released to update vulnerabilities within the browser. 
  • Don't save passwords in your browser.  

Beware of "free” or “stray” devices. 

  • It is possible to stumble across loose USB keys or other external devices, whether left plugged into Queen's computers or on desks, library carols, the ground, etc.  
  • If you find a stray device, don't use it! There are no accidents where malware is concerned, and you never know what an unsolicited device might contain. 

Learn how to respond if you catch a virus. 

  • Don't click on links or visit websites if you're unsure where they lead. 
  • If you aren't sure the source of a link or where it came from, don't click it!  
  • Beware of pop-ups offering to update your system software. This is usually an attempt to infect your computer. 

How do I know if I'm infected? 

The easiest way to know if you're infected is to run a scan on your antivirus. The program should be able to identify any malicious software installed on your device, but there are instances where malware can go undetected by an antivirus program. 

In these instances, you may be infected if you notice: 

  • Your system is running slower than usual 
  • You suddenly experience a large volume of pop-ups 
  • Your device crashes 
  • You run out of hard drive space 
  • You have a new browser homepage, new toolbars, or new websites accessed without your consent or direction 
  • You notice new programs that start automatically on your device 
  • Your antivirus is suddenly disabled 
  • Your friends tell you that they are receiving strange emails or messages from you that you did not send 
  • The battery life of your device drains faster than normal 
  • You are unable to access the control panel or task manager 

What do I do if I've been infected? 

If you suspect you have malware on your device, stop using it for any personal activities! Then: 

  • Bring your device to the IT Support Centre for diagnostics and scans to ensure the threat has been properly removed 
  • Scan your other devices to ensure they have not been compromised 
  • Using another device, change your passwords to ensure any unauthorized access to your personal accounts and data has been cut off

For more infomration, visit the IT Services website.

Gaels romp to 109-0 win in women's rugby

A roundup of Queen's Gaels teams in action over the weekend:

WOMEN’S RUGBY

The No. 8 Queen's Gaels (2-2) demolished the Trent Excalibur (3-1) in the opening quarterfinal round of the OUA playoffs 109-0 Friday night in Kingston.

The Gaels proved to be much stronger and faster than the Excalibur, breaking tackles and beating defenders early and often. Sophie de Goede was the first to score, followed soon by Nadia Popov. The Gaels also showed off their impressive defence, not allowing Trent to enter their zone for most of the opening half while controlling the majority of possession. Mid-way through the half, de Goede managed to score back to back tries and added a fourth in the final minutes before the break.

The Gaels started slowly in the second half, but a nice goal-line run by Lydia Salgo put the Gaels on the board again. Even with a huge lead, the Gaels did not slow down. Emma Frey, Jordi Di Nardo, and Molly Labenski each managed to get in the end-zone early in the second half.

With the win the Gaels advance to the OUA semifinal where they will take on the McMaster Marauders in Hamilton.

MEN’S RUGBY

The Queen's Gaels (6-0) kept their perfect record intact with a 66-15 win on the road at Brock (4-2) on Friday. 

In total eight Gaels scored tries led by two each from Michael Douros and Alex Colborne. Colborne was also able to connect on eight conversions bringing his game total to 26 points.

With the win Queen's moves to 6-0 on the season and have all but locked up the top spot in the OUA.

WOMEN’S SOCCER

The No. 10 Queen's Gaels (8-3-1) split their games in Ottawa, topping the Carleton Ravens (3-9-0) 3-1 on Saturday, before being upended 4-0 by the No. 7 Ottawa Gee-Gees (9-1-3) on Sunday

Against Carleton, Alexandra Doane netted a pair of goals and Micah Vermeer added another as the Gaels controlled the majority of play.

But in Sunday’s clash of top-10 teams Queen’s found themselves down early agains the Gee-Gees and were unable to dig themselves out.

MEN’S SOCCER

The Queen's Gaels (4-5-3) battled it out but came up short with a 2-0 loss against the No. 4 Carleton Ravens (10-1-2) on Saturday.

The Ravens scored in each half and the Gaels were unable to find the back of the net. Goalkeeper Alex Jones made several fantastic saves throughout the game.

MEN’S HOCKEY

The Queen's Gaels were in Ottawa to take on the Gee-Gees in a final tune-up before the OUA season begins next Friday, and scored a 3-0 victory.

Ryan Bloom, Eric Ming and Slater Doggett all scored for the Gaels with Kevin Bailie and Jacob Brennan splitting duties between the pipes, and making 36 saves for the shared shutout.

The Gaels will open their OUA season on Friday Oct., 13 at 7:30 pm when they welcome the Laurentian Voyageurs to the Memorial Centre. For tickets head to gogaelsgo.com/tickets.

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