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Glass, metal, and stone come together on IWC project

  • Repointing work is underway to touch up the limestone façade on the front of the IWC. (University Communications)
    Repointing work is underway to touch up the limestone façade on the front of the IWC. (University Communications)
  • The eastern side of the building is taking shape, where glass meets metal and metal meets heritage limestone. (University Communications)
    The eastern side of the building is taking shape, where glass meets metal and metal meets heritage limestone. (University Communications)
  • Lead contractor EllisDon aims to have the site building largely enclosed within the next few weeks, with tarps covering some exposed sections. (University Communications)
    Lead contractor EllisDon aims to have the site building largely enclosed within the next few weeks, with tarps covering some exposed sections. (University Communications)
  • Heavy pre-cast concrete panels are lifted into place on the north side of the IWC. The panels have been arriving by truck from Ottawa over the past week. (University Communications)
    Heavy pre-cast concrete panels are lifted into place on the north side of the IWC. The panels have been arriving by truck from Ottawa over the past week. (University Communications)
  • Once the building is enclosed, the focus turns indoors. The aim is to have sections of the building ready for Spring 2018, with a grand opening Fall 2018. (University Communications)
    Once the building is enclosed, the focus turns indoors. The aim is to have sections of the building ready for Spring 2018, with a grand opening Fall 2018. (University Communications)

Large pre-cast concrete panels are hoisted into the air, expertly maneuvered into place, and connected with the outer walls of the building.

On another side, glass panels weighing 230 kilograms each are lifted and slipped into the aluminum housing, becoming part of the building’s south-eastern face.

The Innovation and Wellness Centre (IWC) is rapidly taking shape now that demolition work is complete. Contractors aim to have the structure largely closed in within the next few weeks, using tarps to cover some sections. The whole building should be entirely enclosed by the end of the year, allowing the internal work to proceed without interference from the weather.

“The project is proceeding well and we are taking steps to ensure the site, and neighbouring buildings, are ready for the winter,” says Robert Polegato, one of the Project Managers in Physical Plant Services. “There will be some impacts to traffic around the site in the coming weeks, and we are reminding everyone to exercise patience and caution when driving, walking, or cycling past the IWC.”

As part of the remaining exterior work, large slabs of concrete are being brought in on trucks. Once the installation of panels on the southern and western sides of the building begins, likely in late November, there will also be a lane reduction on Union in front of the centre while additional panels are brought to the site.

Stay tuned for more updates regarding the Innovation and Wellness Centre project in the coming weeks.

Queen’s United Way campaign surpasses two-thirds of goal

The Queen’s United Way Campaign Committee has set a fundraising goal of $320,000 for this year’s campaign in support of United Way of Kingston, Frontenac Lennox and Addington.

To date, the campaign has reached $216,327, or 67.6 per cent of its goal.

Queen’s community members can back the United Way through payroll deduction, a one-time gift, credit card, cheque or cash. To make a donation online through the United Way’s ePledge system, simply go to queensu.ca/unitedway. Please note that if you donated last year and selected the auto-renewal action, no further action is required unless you would like to change your donation. 

More information on the campaign and the role of the Queen’s United Way Campaign Committee is available in this Gazette article.

Students accessing Indigenous self-identification mechanism

More than 100 students with Indigenous ancestry have chosen to self-identify to the university within the first few months of the launch of a new mechanism in the SOLUS student information system.

"Four Directions Aboriginal Students Centre Welcome Back Barbecue"
The annual Welcome Back Barbecue held in September at the Four Directions Aboriginal Student Centre was attended by students, faculty, staff and community members. (Photo by Candice Pinto)

Self-identifying provides students with the opportunity to become part of the Aboriginal community at Queen’s, practice and/or learn more about their culture, and access resources like tutoring services, scholarships, cultural workshops, and on-campus Elders.

Some students choose to self-identify to the university during the application process, but until now, that has been the only time they can formally do so. This voluntary and confidential mechanism, comprising five questions, also gives Indigenous students the opportunity to consent to being contacted by an Indigenous student services staff member. To date, almost 60 students have requested outreach.

Vanessa McCourt, Aboriginal Advisor at Four Directions, says she is connecting with students from several faculties and schools.

“We’re seeing a lot more graduate and professional students self-identifying who we otherwise may not have known about,” says Ms. McCourt. “Many students, especially graduate students, may have had to leave an Indigenous community at their previous school, and come to Queen’s without a connection or way to form those communities here. By self-identifying, and receiving resources like the Four Directions E-Newsletter, students are able to foster those new relationships here at Queen’s. I am also in touch with some distance students who are accessing services and supports.”

The mechanism is being promoted across campus through posters, the distribution of bookmarks and brochures, on social media and an on-line hub of information. A new video and poster series also launched this month. In the video, Indigenous students and recent grads talk about why they choose to self-identify.

“I’ve never not self-identified. It has made me more comfortable with myself,” says Taylor Bluhm (NSc’18). “It’s nice to talk to people who are going through the same things as you are. If I ever have a question about absolutely anything, Four Directions is always there to help answer my questions.”  

“I wouldn’t have gotten involved with so many things if I didn’t self-identify,” adds Thomas Dymond (Meds’20). “Students unions, different projects, and ultimately jobs, that all came from getting involved, getting to know people, and being a part of a community.”

The mechanism was developed with funding from the Ontario Ministry of Advanced Education and Skill Development’s Targeted Initiatives Fund. This month, Ms. McCourt and Paul Pearsall, Associate University Registrar (Student Information Systems), are presenting at a national post-secondary systems conference about the mechanism, its development, and the results to date.

The text used for the mechanism was developed by a student-led project team, and included a campus-wide consultation with students, faculty members, staff and other institutions to come up with a set of optional questions that aims to encourage self-identification. The application was designed and implemented by the Enterprise Solutions Peoplesoft team in the Office of the University Registrar. 

To learn more about Indigenous self-identification at Queen’s, visit queensu.ca/fdasc/self-identify

Invitation to provide feedback to Queen’s Principalship Review

Queen’s University Chancellor Jim Leech recently sent out an email to all staff, students, and faculty inviting everyone to complete a survey on the present state and future development of the university and of the principalship. Chancellor Leech is the chair of the Joint Board/Senate Committee to Review the Principalship that was established earlier this term when Daniel Woolf indicated he wishes to be considered for a third and final term. He will complete his current term in June 2019.

The committee wants to hear from members of the Queen’s community and the feedback it receives will help inform its discussions. The committee is planning to submit its recommendation on reappointment to the Board of Trustees in December.

The email was sent out by the University Secretariat’s Office on behalf of the chancellor on Wednesday, Oct. 25 to faculty, student, and staff Queen’s email accounts. It includes a link to the online survey where people can share their thoughts confidentially as well as a link to a webpage with information that may be helpful, including a letter from Principal Woolf. Please note that anonymous responses are not permitted.

The survey will remain open until Nov. 17, 2017 at noon and access to it is only from the email invitation.

If you do not wish to complete the survey or you did not receive the email invitation, you can visit the Joint Board-Senate Committee to Review the Principalship webpage to find out more about how to contribute your feedback. You may also email univsec@queensu.ca with any questions you may have.

Provost and VP (Finance and Administration) Budget Presentation 2017-18 video

For those who were not able to attend recent budget presentations by Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) Benoit-Antoine Bacon and Vice-Principal (Finance and Administration) Donna Janiec, please watch the below video to see their presentation.

A call to end corporal punishment

Community forum creates document calling for an end to physical punishment by parents.

A new Christian Theological Statement issued last Friday calls on the federal government to repeal Section 43 of the Criminal Code of Canada.

The statement was written and issued by a group of scholars, policy makers, Christian church leaders and general public who recently met at Queen’s University in support of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s (TRC) Call to Action #6 in regards to physical punishment by parents to correct a child’s behavior.

"Children's health painting"Section 43 of the Criminal Code of Canada provides a legal defense for the use of physical punishment by parents and people standing in the place of parents.

“Because the TRC’s Call to Action #6 is to repeal the law that allows for the corporal punishment of children, I thought that maybe if we got Indigenous leaders, public health researchers, church leaders, Christian theologians and other stakeholders in the same room, we could address this in a multidimensional way, which would be more powerful than working on it on our own,” says co-organizer Valerie Michaelson (Public Health Sciences and School of Religion). “What happened was remarkable, and every participant embraced the urgency of responding to this call to action. This is by far the most important project I’ve ever been involved in.”

William Morrow (School of Religion) addressed the concern of some Christian groups who see repeal of Section 43 of the Criminal Code as one that compromises their interpretation of the Bible.

“The history of scriptural interpretation shows that even quite conservative communities have the means for moving past the literal implications of certain biblical passages when the circumstances warrant,” says Dr. Morrow. “The major issue is to convince them of the sizeable dangers that accompany the corporal punishment of children, no matter how mild.”

The result of this was the gathering last week and the creation of the statement which include six recommendations:

  1. We call upon Christian churches to petition our government to ensure the full protection of children, including the repeal of section 43 of the Criminal Code of Canada.
  2. We call upon Christian churches to recognize the deep societal wounds that remain as a result of colonialism, and to actively address the on-going, disproportionate physical, spiritual and emotional harm experienced by Indigenous children and youth.
  3. We call upon Christian churches to increase awareness in our communities of the impact of violence, including physical punishment, in homes, families, institutions and communities.
  4. We call upon all Christian churches to endorse the Joint Statement on Physical Punishment of Children and Youth.
  5. We call upon all leaders and educators in Christian communities to be active in the protection of children.
  6. We call upon all Christians to work together in continuing to develop healthy, effective and non-violent approaches to discipline in raising children and youth.

“This statement is a major moment for the churches,” says Right Reverend Mark MacDonald, National Indigenous Bishop, Anglican Church of Canada. “Advocating reconciliation and child protection, the statement makes a progressive and positive contribution to both.  In that, it is prophetic and urgent.”

The statement also acknowledged the damage caused to First Nations, Inuit and Metis children by residential schools.

“Corporal punishment was a primary means of control and source of suffering in the Indian Residential Schools,” says Joan Durrant (University of Manitoba). “It was used to silence children, destroy their languages, and enforce their submission to many indignities and acts of violence.  At this forum, a group of Christian leaders, theologians, and other members of Christian communities responded to the TRC’s Call to Action #6 by proclaiming their support for the repeal of Section 43 of the Criminal Code.”

For more information or to read the paper, visit the website.

Women's cross country team captures OUA title

"Women's cross country team holds up OUA banner"
The Queen's Gaels women's cross country team won the OUA championship in Windsor on Saturday, earning the team their first banner in 13 years. (Supplied photo)

A quick roundup of Queen's Gaels teama and athletes competing over the weekend:

CROSS COUNTRY

The No. 1 Queen's Gaels women’s cross country team took the OUA championship in Windsor on Saturday, led by a gold medal performance from Branna MacDougall.

The men’s team also put in a strong performance, claiming the bronze medal.

The Gaels dethroned the 13-time reigning champion Guelph Gryphons, finishing with 37 points, 25 points ahead of the silver medalist Toronto Varsity Blues (62). The Gryphons earned the bronze medal with 79 points.  

Second-year runner Branna MacDougall finished first overall in the women's 8km race, becoming the second consecutive Gael to earn OUA MVP honours after Claire Sumner won the title in 2016. MacDougall crossed the finish line in a time of 27:19.5.

Close behind MacDougall were fellow first-team All-Stars Amy Stephenson in fourth in 27:43.3 and Claire Sumner in fifth  in 27:46.1. Molly Steer was named a second-team All-Star finishing 10th in a time of 28:35.2 and Taylor Sills rounded out the Queen's scorers in 17th in a time of 29:16.9.

The Gaels men earned the bronze medal with 85 points behind Guelph (41) and McMaster (50). Eric Wynands finished fourth in a time of 30:45.3 taking first-team All-Star honours while teammate Mark Schmidt took the final second-team All-Star spot finishing 14th in a time of 31:06.4.

FOOTBALL

The Queen's Gaels lost a nail-biting OUA quarterfinal matchup 12-9 to the No. 6 McMaster Marauders on a rainy Saturday afternoon in Hamilton, bringing their season to an end.

Struggling with the tough conditions, both teams struggled early on offence.

Eventually, the Marauders put the game’s first points on the board as Dan Petermann hauled in a 24-yard pass from Jackson White to make it 7-0 for the home side.

The Marauders used the run game to control the clock and keep the field position in their favour throughout the first half. McMaster running back Jordan Lyons rushed 39 times for 319 yards in the game to set a career-high mark.

After a field goal and a Queen's safety, McMaster went into the half ahead of Queen's 12-0.

Queen's picked up their pace in the second half starting on the opening possession. Quarterback Nate Hobbs found Matteo Del Brocco and Jake Puskus rushed for a big gain putting the Gaels in field goal position. Nick Liberatore connected from 27 yards to put Queen's on the board.

The defence kept Queen's in it as they continued to make big plays. With McMaster pushing for more points, Jason Shamatutu snagged an interception in the Gaels endzone to keep the Marauders from extending their lead.

Late in the third quarter after a Marauder fumble on a punt return, the Gaels were able to tack on another three as Liberatore hit from 30-yards out.

After a 33-yard reception by Chris Osei-Kusi to end the third quarter, the Gaels set up another Liberatore field goal, this time from 33-yards out to get within three.

Each team traded missed field goals, but the Gaels controlled the possession game in the final frame.

Queen's was able to get to the McMaster 39-yard line after Osei-Kusi picked up a big first down on a third and five with an 11-yard reception.

On the next play, a Hobbs pass was intercepted by the Marauders and brought to mid-field.

Queen's had one final shot on a Hail Mary attempt, but it was incomplete, and the Marauders held on for the win.

WOMEN’S SOCCER

The Queen's Gaels defeated the No. 10 Ottawa Gee-Gees 5-4 in penalty kicks in their quarterfinal playoff match Saturday at Richardson Stadium. 

The teams ended regulation and two overtime halves tied 1-1, pushing the match to penalties.

The Gee-Gees were first on the board after 22 minutes with a free kick just outside the 18-yard box.

However the Gaels struck back in the 39th minute as Laura Callender found the back of the net from a similar distance.

Queen’s kept up the pressure throughout the second half but were unable to find the breakthrough.

In the shoot-out the Gaels were perfect with Callender, Kyra Steer, Jamie Foot, Taylor Green and Jenny Wolever converting before the final Ottawa kicker put her shot over the bar.

The Gaels now advance to the OUA Final Four along with Western, Guelph and UOIT.

WOMEN’S HOCKEY

The Queen's Gaels (4-0-0-1) held on to take a 3-1 decision over the No. 7 Guelph Gryphons (1-0-3-0) on Saturday.

 Stephanie Pascal was outstanding in net for the Gaels, picking up 29 saves in the victory while Addi Halladay scored an empty netter with 12 seconds remaining to seal the deal.

The Gaels opened the scoring early as Katrina Manoukarakis potted her OUA leading fourth goal of the season. Micaela Smith scored her first goal of the season to extend the Gaels lead to 2-0 later in the first.

On Sunday, the Gaels defeated the York Lions (0-0-4-1) by a score of 4-1. Bryce Desa led the way with her first two goals of the season, with others going to Addi Halladay and Jessica Wakefield.

MEN’S HOCKEY

The Queen's Gaels (3-0-3) lost both of their games in overtime on the weekend at home.

On Saturday the Gaels lost 4-3 to the Concordia Stingers (4-1-1). Ryan Bloom opened the scoring for Queen’s and Slater Doggett added a pair of goals.

On Friday the Gaels fell 3-2 in overtime to the No. 5 ranked McGill Redmen (6-1-0). Jaden Lindo and Darcy Greenaway scored for Queen’s.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

The Queen's Gaels (1-0) women's basketball team opened their season on Friday at the ARC, taking down Lakehead (0-1) 77-61.

Coming into the season with a lot of momentum after a successful 2016-17 campaign, the Gaels team hope to replicate the success of last year, where they went undefeated in the regular season and finished fourth in the USPORTS championship.

After a slow start the Gaels gained momentum and finished the opening quarter trialing 19-18. But the Gaels heated up in the second to finish the half 48-33.

Queen’s kept the lead the rest of the way with Marianne leading the way with 21 points and Andrea Priamo adding 15, with nine rebounds.

MEN’S BASKETBALL

The Queen's Gaels (1-0) opened their season beating the Lakehead Thunderwolves (0-1) 95-68 at the ARC on Friday.

The home side started off hot with St. Lawrence College transfer Jaz Bains opening the scoring with a pull-up three-pointer. The Gaels ended the quarter with a 26-13 lead.

The Gaels kept up the pressure and entered the final quarter leading 68-47. Bains led the scoring with 18 points, along with eight assists and eight rebounds. Tanner Graham and Mike Shoveller added 16 points each.

Spooky stories from a 500-year old castle

  • One of the first documented stories claiming that the castle was haunted, from a Utah newspaper in 1930. The castle's new American owners reportedly "scoffed at ghosts" and "adored haunted rooms". (Supplied Photo)
    One of the first documented stories claiming that the castle was haunted, from a Utah newspaper in 1930. The castle's new American owners reportedly "scoffed at ghosts" and "adored haunted rooms". (Supplied Photo)
  • This ghost-spotter begins their letter with, "Dear Doug, This is not a joke!" Students, faculty, and staff documented their encounters with ghosts for Doug Littlejohn through the 90s and early 2000s. (University Communications)
    This ghost-spotter begins their letter with, "Dear Doug, This is not a joke!" Students, faculty, and staff documented their encounters with ghosts for Doug Littlejohn through the 90s and early 2000s. (University Communications)
  • A mysterious lady figure in black, seen on the right. "Everyone at the wedding is adamant she was not there, and not one of the guests" says BISC Librarian Sarah Butler. (Supplied Photo)
    A mysterious lady figure in black, seen on the right. "Everyone at the wedding is adamant she was not there, and not one of the guests" says BISC Librarian Sarah Butler. (Supplied Photo)
  • Ten-year old Anne Cynthia Kneale saw what she thought was her mother. After realizing the woman she saw was not her mother, she penned this note and created a sketch of what she saw. (Supplied Photo)
    Ten-year old Anne Cynthia Kneale saw what she thought was her mother. After realizing the woman she saw was not her mother, she penned this note and created a sketch of what she saw. (Supplied Photo)
  • This photo, snapped by an early morning cleaner, raises the question...who or what is that by the piano on the stairs? (Supplied Photo)
    This photo, snapped by an early morning cleaner, raises the question...who or what is that by the piano on the stairs? (Supplied Photo)

Items have moved without explanation.

There have been mysterious sightings of people who then vanish without a trace.

Students, faculty, and staff have reported hoofbeats, drums playing, calls for help, and even singing – sometimes in French.

Is Herstmonceux Castle haunted? It’s a question that has surfaced now and again, particularly around this time of year.

“I have seen and felt things in certain part of the castle so, yes, I do believe the BISC to be haunted,” says Andy Dalli, who has worked at the BISC as a security officer for the past 16 years and has captured a few ghostly figures on his digital camera. “I think I am lucky to work here and I believe the spirits are silent allies in my job.”

The castle was donated to Queen’s in the 1990s by the Bader family, and it was around this time that Doug Littlejohn, a former tour operator at the castle, began collecting ghost stories. He asked residents and visitors to write out their spooky encounters on pieces of paper which he saved in the castle’s archives. Though Mr. Littlejohn has since passed on, and stories are no longer being formally collected, the legends persist.

By his count, five ghosts call the castle home: Grace Naylor, known as the Grey Lady, who was the daughter of an 18th century owner of the castle and passed away on site; Bethia Hare, also the daughter of an 18th century owner, who has been seen in a long white dress leading a deer on a leash; Roger de Tournay, a 13th century soldier who rides a ghostly horse around campus; Thomas Fiennes, who was hung in 1541 in a nearby town; and a boy known only as “The Headless Drummer”. Other sightings have included a horse and a blonde rider, a clergyman, a woodcutter, a woman wearing a long dress with a bonnet and occasionally appearing with a baby, and a woman who hangs around the driveway. Reports of the castle being haunted go back to at least the 18th century.

While the sightings are harder to explain, the ‘ghost sounds’ may not be. Shelley Katz, a Musician in Residence at the BISC, believes the ‘sad, moaning voices’ coming from the ballroom on dark and stormy nights may actually be caused by the building itself. “The ballroom is constructed in an unusual fashion that has some particularly resonant low frequencies,” Dr. Katz says. “If the room has no chairs at all, and if one is standing in a particular location, a stamp in the room will resonate and ring like a bell. On dark stormy nights, if some of the windows are left open, the wind blowing past the windows will ‘play' the room like a flute, producing wailing and moaning sounds, at very low frequencies.”

Minor pranks, frights, and inconveniences aside, over the years it seems that the ghosts and the regularly changing inhabitants of the castle have learned to co-exist.

“In seminar six, I would unlock it, go out and get the cleaning things, and go back, and by the time I got back it would be locked again…the only way I could get in was to knock on the door and say “Come on Grace, I have to get in!”,” reported Aideene, one of the hospitality staff, of a shift in 1996. “I have never had any trouble after that.”

Most at the BISC aren’t bothered by the long-standing myths – and the stories can even be a source of amusement. “On one occasion, I took my students to the crypt where they read aloud passages of the novel The Castle of Otranto,” recalls Professor Peter Lowe, who teaches English and who, along with Professor Shannon Smith, devised the crypt visit for students in ENGL100. “During the reading, there was a distinct knocking from the coffin located in the crypt which spooked faculty and students alike. It turned out to be the Operations Director Sandy Montgomery who had used the occasion to play his own trick on the students by lying in the coffin and knocking repeatedly upon it. To say it added atmosphere to the experience would be an understatement.”

The Bader International Study Centre, located at Herstmonceux Castle in East Sussex, England, offers a dynamic educational experience, combining a historic campus centered around a 15th-century castle with small class sizes and Queen’s world-class faculty and programs. The BISC was founded in 1993 thanks to a generous donation by Queen’s alumni Drs. Alfred and Isabel Bader. Learn more about the BISC at www.queensu.ca/bisc

Queen’s United Way campaign tops $200,000

The Queen’s United Way Campaign Committee has set a fundraising goal of $320,000 for this year’s campaign in support of United Way of Kingston, Frontenac Lennox and Addington.

United Way ThermometerTo date, the campaign has reached $203,419, or 63.6 per cent of its goal.

Queen’s community members can back the United Way through payroll deduction, a one-time gift, credit card, cheque or cash. To make a donation online through the United Way’s ePledge system, simply go to queensu.ca/unitedway. Please note that if you donated last year and selected the auto-renewal action, no further action is required unless you would like to change your donation. 

More information on the campaign and the role of the Queen’s United Way Campaign Committee is available in this Gazette article.

Queen’s Industrial Relations Centre celebrating 80 years

Queen's University Industrial Relations Centre (IRC) is celebrating 80 years of offering transformative professional programs.

The IRC currently offers one- to five-day professional development programs in the area of labour relations, human resources and organizational development.

"Stephanie Noel leads the celebration of the Industrial Relations Centre's 80th birthday"
Stephanie Noel, Business Development Manager, and her colleagues at the Industrial Relations Centre (IRC), recently celebrated the centre's 80th birthday. (Supplied photo)

“The IRC has a long history of presenting well-respected and well-attended programs and conferences to help people retrain and upgrade their knowledge and skills to adapt to the changing world of work,” says Stephanie Noel, Business Development Manager at the IRC.

Queen's University introduced the study of Industrial Relations on Oct. 12, 1937, when the university formed the Industrial Relations Section. It was the first department of its kind in the country, a true pioneer. In the ensuing years, Queen's professors, researchers, students and staff contributed more to the understanding and development of industrial relations in Canada than any other institution.

In 1960, the Queen’s Industrial Relations Section was renamed the IRC.  The IRC went on to spur the creation of the School of Industrial Relations, and two academic programs, a Master of Industrial Relations (MIR) and a Professional Master of Industrial Relations (PMIR), which now run separately from the IRC.

Through the years, the IRC helped shape public policy through its research and publications program, which informed debate on key issues and surveyed developments and trends in the industrial relations field.

Queen’s IRC is a leading provider of premium professional development programs in labour relations, human resources and organization development.

“Our programs are designed for busy practitioners, delivered by subject matter experts, and grounded in adult learning principles,” says Ms. Noel. “Courses offer a mix of lecture and hands-on opportunities to practice new skills, and include tools, templates, strategies, case studies and simulations.”

For further information, please visit the website.

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