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175th Anniversary

Building on the legacy of 175

Daniel Woolf, Queen's University Principal

The banners are down, the festivities are concluded, and it is now time to take stock of the celebration that was our 175th anniversary.

From its inception, we planned the anniversary to reflect on our many past accomplishments, while celebrating our present and building towards the future. The anniversary commemorated the high heights, forced us to reflect on the more difficult moments, and ultimately led to some meaningful change in our university community.

Whether you consider the revitalization of cherished campus spaces like Richardson Stadium, the celebration of many accomplished alumni (from business leaders, to leading academics, to rock stars), the Guinness World Record winning giant Q, or the history that was revisited through our 175th moments – as just a few examples – it is clear to even the casual observer that our anniversary achieved these goals, and beyond.

These events certainly encapsulated the spirit of the 175th – and the spirit truly shone through in the way all members of our community embraced the anniversary. David Walker, Director and Chair of the 175 Committee, commented that all of the 140 groups his team met with across campus wanted to take part. Our pride, our energy, and our community spirit was on full display throughout the anniversary. Thank you all for your enthusiastic response to this important milestone in our history.

Like any good celebration, this, too, must at some point come to an end. And so, as we mark the start of another academic year, we bid farewell to Queen’s 175th anniversary and turn our attention to the future – bringing with us our memories, pride, and renewed optimism about the future of Queen’s.

There are many great things about our university, including our fantastic students, remarkable faculty, and dedicated staff. What continues to make Queen’s unique is our focus on both an extraordinary experience for undergraduate and graduate students – inside and outside the classroom – coupled with our identity as a research intensive institution – as a national and international leader.

I have always thought our best days lie ahead of us. If we look 25 years ahead to our 200th anniversary, I believe the Queen’s of 2041 will be an institution that still takes its traditions seriously and values them, but recognizes that traditions change and evolve. As I said in my 2012 essay The Third Juncture, we are an institution in a period of change – technological change, demographic change, and changes in the needs and expectations of our student body. All that has been achieved in the past 175 years has equipped us for today, and yet we cannot necessarily carry on as we always have and expect the same level of success in the future.

Our challenge, then, is to strengthen those aspects essential to the Queen’s of the past and present – our reputation for quality, our history of producing outstanding graduates at all levels, our enduring student and alumni spirit of initiative – while seizing the opportunity to reinvent ourselves yet again.

In the years ahead, I would like to see Queen’s advance its reputation for being on the cutting edge, for risk taking, for innovation in pedagogy, and for internationally renowned research. We have already started to embrace a leadership position in these areas, and it is distinctive factors such as these which will allow us to continue attracting the best and brightest students in the country – and, increasingly, from around the world.

With the 175th behind us, we have a clear picture of where we have come from and what we must do. It’s time to look to the future, and the future of Queen’s is bright.  

Favourite 175th moments

The Gazette asked a few members of the Queen's community for their favourite memories from the anniversary. Here is what they had to say.

Jan Allen

"The fall 2016 exhibit Ciara Phillips: Comrade Objects and her five-week residency were Queen's 175 highlights for me. Hosting this internationally renowned artist – who is also a proud alumna – was meaningful for the gallery, for Fine Arts students, and for Ciara. She made so many connections here, fully in the Queen's spirit!" 

-Jan Allen, Director of The Agnes Etherington Art Centre 

Sandra Murray

"The Creative Expressions project was a unique initiative to celebrate both the 175th and the 25th anniversary of our centre. Through a collaborative art display, multi-location exhibits, and commemorative book, we showcased the creativity that happens in teaching and learning, looking at unique and memorable class projects and learning opportunities. There was strong participation from students, faculty, staff, and alumni – in addition to the committee, eight faculty, staff, and students it took to complete this project. Creative Expressions, led by Peter Wolf, was one of my favourite experiences at Queen’s in my 30 years of working here. " 

-Sandra Murray, Program Coordinator with The Centre for Teaching and Learning

David Lyon

"We had arranged a series of events exploring big data questions. I was delighted that both people who were very committed to the idea of using big data and those who were exceedingly skeptical about the term and practices associated actually heard each other through this series. We had deliberately set it up as a cross-campus initiative and that worked very well. The experience of meeting with people from different schools, faculties and departments all over campus was really good." 

-David Lyon, Director of the Surveillance Studies Centre, and Professor

Cam Yung

"Homecoming was number one for me. My graduating class, 2016, was the first to participate in the "Graduation Class of 0". I hadn't had the chance to see my friends since the spring so this was a great opportunity to catch up. Plus, watching the football game, having the chance to go to the  ReUnion Street festival, and meeting the alumni were also highlights. It all brings you back into the history that we have at this institution." 

-Cam Yung, Rector

Sue Bates

"Absolutely my favourite memory from the 175th was the Queen’s University Alumni Association Global Oil Thigh video. Our global alumni network was on full display. We had people submit videos from Australia, Switzerland, across Canada, across the globe." 

-Sue Bates, President, Queen's University Alumni Association

Michael Blair (Supplied Photo)

"Over the course of my three-year involvement planning the 175th Anniversary, the opportunity to meet with over 130 stakeholders, both internal and external to Queen's, was by far the highlight. I developed an appreciation for just how many unique ways members of our community contribute to the university, Kingston, and Canada." 

-Mike Blair, Queen’s 175th anniversary co-ordinator and chair of the 175 moments curation team

Tricia Baldwin

"One of my favourite memories was our inaugural Isabel Overton-Bader Canadian violin competition - the first time we have run a national competition. We attracted the best and the brightest Canadian violin players, literally from St. John's to Victoria. It was a great pleasure to have members of the Bader and Overton families present. We all witnessed the commitment of all the competitors who all play their hearts out. It was so moving to see the next generation of artists perform at such a high level." 

-Tricia Baldwin, Director of the Isabel Bader Centre for the Performing Arts

Daniel Woolf

"There were so many great 175th memories that it is pretty tough to narrow it down to just one. The Giant Human Q would be a contender, as would the Global Oil Thigh, or hosting the annual meeting of the Royal Society of Canada. But to me the memory that I will carry with me most is the special Senate meeting marking the anniversary first day of classes at Queen's, both because of the importance of the day (marked by a Latin agenda!) and the manner in which the ceremony contained a meaningful step toward Queen's reconciliation with the aboriginal peoples on whose grounds we sit, whose colonization we inadvertently contributed to, and, in the wake of our Truth and Reconciliation Commission task force, with whom we aspire to collaborate more closely in the coming years." 

-Daniel Woolf, Principal and Professor

Committee chair reflects on 175th

As Queen’s University’s 175th anniversary celebrations come to a close, the Gazette sat down with David Walker, Director and Chair, 175th. Dr. Walker (Meds'71) is also the Stauffer-Dunning Chair and executive director, School of Policy Studies.

David Walker, Chair of the 175th

GAZETTE: What will you take away from your time as chair of Queen’s 175th anniversary?

DAVID WALKER: Engagement was the key principle for our efforts, and so we met with 140 groups, units, and schools across campus. Our job was to encourage them to do something for the 175th, or take something they were already doing and add a 175th component. The response was truly remarkable. Everyone wanted to take part, and there was great enthusiasm and excitement around the anniversary. The involvement of people from across Queen’s, their pride, and their willingness to participate was inspiring. As a result, the 175th really shone a light on what goes on at Queen’s in a year. There is always something going on that is fascinating and wonderful at this university.

I also really enjoyed meeting so many different people from across the university who I would not normally interact with. Through our work I met the team behind Islamic History Month, the Jamaican Canadian diaspora, the staff at the Four Directions Aboriginal Student Centre, employees at the Agnes and Isabel, faculty within the philosophy and engineering departments, and Matthew Barrett, Grounds Manager within Physical Plant Services, to name a few. It was a wonderful experience to meet enthusiastic people who would tell us about what they do. It was also very useful for our students to be able to get to know their academy in a way they wouldn’t otherwise. Students Rico Garcia and Mike Blair were mature beyond their years, did so much work, and expressed so much support for Queen’s.

GAZETTE: Did you have a favourite memory or moment from the 175th?

DAVID WALKER: The big Q was a definite highlight. It was really impressive, and I have never seen so many students so committed – and the close working relationship with student leaders made a significant difference. I did not think we would be able to get even 2,500 students organized and doing exactly as we told them to do, but it was really well organized thanks to University Relations. The representative from Guinness said, even if we did not win the award, that we should get one regardless for our level of organization! I also want to thank everyone – employees, students, and alumni – for participating.

The landscaping and beautification of campus was another highlight. Between the tricolour flowers, the tulips, and the commemorative banners, the campus looked so beautiful.

I would also mention the support of the Perth Friends of Queen’s, as we unveiled the plaques commemorating William Morris and the anniversary of both Queen’s and the Town of Perth. It was a very special moment, and the first initiative that arose – they actually approached us.

There are many others worth mentioning. I could not attend everything because the level of activity was quite remarkable – attending everything would have been a full-time job.

  • The Giant Q was a highlight for many, including 175th Chair David Walker. The Guinness World Record-winning human letter featured 3,373 people.
    The Giant Q was a highlight for many, including 175th Chair David Walker. The Guinness World Record-winning human letter featured 3,373 people.
  • There were many noticeable improvements across campus as part of the anniversary, such as the 175 letters near the John Deutsch University Centre.
    There were many noticeable improvements across campus as part of the anniversary, such as the 175 letters near the John Deutsch University Centre.
  • Nathan Brinklow, a lecturer in the Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures, speaks at a special Senate meeting commemorating the 175th.
    Nathan Brinklow, a lecturer in the Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures, speaks at a special Senate meeting commemorating the 175th.
  • Nobel Prize-winning Professor Dr. Arthur McDonald cuts the ribbon on the "New Eyes on the Universe" exhibit, which was featured in the Agnes Etherington Art Centre.
    Nobel Prize-winning Professor Dr. Arthur McDonald cuts the ribbon on the "New Eyes on the Universe" exhibit, which was featured in the Agnes Etherington Art Centre.
  • A special re-convocation ceremony celebrated the contributions Judge Kin Kee Pang, Arts’70, who is the longtime president of the Hong Kong Branch of the Queen’s University Alumni Association.
    A special re-convocation ceremony celebrated the contributions Judge Kin Kee Pang, Arts’70, who is the longtime president of the Hong Kong Branch of the Queen’s University Alumni Association.

GAZETTE: Any challenges you overcame or moments that you were especially proud of?

DAVID WALKER: The 175 Moments, which Duncan McDowell and Mike Blair worked on, was an exciting and yet delicate initiative. We tried to be thoughtful to ensure the moments selected were marked by diversity of generations, theme, geography, ideas, and gender. We knew those moments would, by their nature, include moments that were difficult that we learned from – and we would need to cast them appropriately. They are part of what made Queen’s and what led us to now.

GAZETTE: As we look ahead to two centuries of Queen’s, what is the legacy of Queen’s 175th?

DAVID WALKER: As our university evolves over the next quarter century, I think we will find the 175th crystallized our thinking about a number of issues and seminal moments. It was an important moment to pause, think, and look forward about where we have been, where we are, and where we are going.

GAZETTE: What happens next?

DAVID WALKER: Mike Blair is writing a report that will be archived and will explain how we went about it, and what happened. We will also be conducting an impact assessment – looking at whether we achieved our objectives, or to what extent. And, of course, we can start thinking about the 200th anniversary – though they will need to find someone else to chair that one.

The Queen’s 175th report will be available on the Principal’s website later this year.

This interview has been edited and condensed for length and clarity.

175th celebrations concluded

Queen's 175th logo

The 175th anniversary was a special occasion for our community to reflect on the past, celebrate the present, and look to the future. The many exciting events and announcements, the celebration of our history and the many accomplished members of our university, and the widespread participation of the Queen's community helped to make the anniversary an overwhelming success.

Now that the 175th anniversary celebrations have concluded, this is a reminder to discontinue use of the 175th logo in emails, websites, documents, banners, and other mediums. Anything created for 175th-specific initiatives such as pamphlets, promotional materials for 175th events, or news stories do not need to be edited after the fact to remove the logo – however, all departments are asked to phase out the use of the logo on new materials going forward. In its stead, please continue to use the standard Queen’s logo and refer to the Queen’s University Visual Identity Policy.

Should you have any questions about this announcement, please contact University Marketing.

Shining a light on a piece of Queen’s history

  • Principal Daniel Woolf stands alongside Mati Bernabei and Gina Jack after unveiling a new plaque on the statue of Venus that was brought into the University Club 38 years ago by their father, former Classics professor Richard Bernabei.
    Principal Daniel Woolf stands alongside Mati Bernabei and Gina Jack after unveiling a new plaque on the statue of Venus that was brought into the University Club 38 years ago by their father, former Classics professor Richard Bernabei.
  • Mati Bernabei speaks at a special event honouring her father, former Classics professor Richard Bernabei, hosted at the University Club.
    Mati Bernabei speaks at a special event honouring her father, former Classics professor Richard Bernabei, hosted at the University Club.
  • Principal Daniel Woolf speaks to Mati Bernabei and Gina Jack during a special event honouring their father, former Classics professor Richard Bernabei, who once taught the principal at Queen's.
    Principal Daniel Woolf speaks to Mati Bernabei and Gina Jack during a special event honouring their father, former Classics professor Richard Bernabei, who once taught the principal at Queen's.
  • Barbara Reeves (Classics) points out some details in a poster highlighting the replicas within the Department of Classics to two attendees of an event honouring former Classics professor Richard Bernabei.
    Barbara Reeves (Classics) points out some details in a poster highlighting the replicas within the Department of Classics to two attendees of an event honouring former Classics professor Richard Bernabei.

The history of Queen’s is long and colourful and because of this, unfortunately, some of the personalities that are part of that 175-year story have been forgotten.

Recently, the Department of Classics and the University Club honoured a past professor and shone a light on one of his contributions during his time at Queen’s with a special event hosted by the University Club.

[Queen's 175]Richard Bernabei was a Classics professor at Queen’s from 1965-78, and during that time he had an impact on many of his colleagues, as well as students, including current Principal Daniel Woolf, who spoke at the event.

Organized by Barbara Reeves (Classics), an associate professor and coordinator of Queen’s Classics at 175, the event was aimed at remembering Dr. Bernabei’s contributions inside and outside the lecture hall, including a Venus de Milo statue that he “smuggled” into the University Club in 1979 that has become a fixture of the building.

At the event a plaque was unveiled for the statue.  

“Dr. Bernabei impacted a lot of students, including Principal Woolf. He donated this statue which has been admired for the past 38 years by people at the University Club, not necessarily knowing about him but they have benefitted from it, and yet we don’t know him,” Dr. Reeves says, adding that she felt it was important to provide some recognition.

The event attracted a wide range of Queen’s community members including former colleagues, friends and Dr. Bernabei’s daughters – Mati Bernabei and Gina Jack.

“There were people from all across campus, and that was wonderful,” Dr. Reeves says. “It was not a departmental function. There were people from everywhere who were interested in the statue, who were interested in Queen’s history.”

The wording on the plaque matches a request written in a letter 25 years ago by Dr. Bernabei’s ex-wife Wilma, who was a long-time Queen’s employee, as well as the university’s first employment equity officer. 

With the statue being a part of their history, the University Club paid for the plaque and the reception and helped promote the event.

It was also a special event for Dr. Bernabei’s daughters providing an opportunity to reconnect with Queen’s and to tell their family’s story.

“The reception in honour of our father was deeply moving for us,” says Mati Bernabei. “He was still a young man when he died, and my sister and I were just teenagers. The circumstances of his death were difficult – grief weighed heavily at the time. But now, 38 years later, this event provided my sister and I, and our father’s friends and former students, an opportunity to celebrate his life, his art, and his passion for teaching.”

“I have no doubt that he would be absolutely delighted that it was Venus who brought us all together,” says Gina Jack. “When he brought her to the University Club he was extremely ill – nonetheless, he hatched a plan, and snuck his beloved Venus into her rightful home. The reception, and the plaque, honouring her, and establishing her place officially as a permanent resident of the club, was the perfect way to honour our father.”

Looking at the universe with 'New Eyes'

  • Nobel Laureate and Professor Emeritus Art McDonald helps open the New Eyes on the Universe exhibit on Friday, May 26. The exhibit is open to the public at the Agnes Etherington Art Centre from May 27-July 7.
    Nobel Laureate and Professor Emeritus Art McDonald helps open the New Eyes on the Universe exhibit on Friday, May 26. The exhibit is open to the public at the Agnes Etherington Art Centre from May 27-July 7.
  • One of the most popular features of the New Eyes on the Universe exhibit is a life-size virtual display of Art McDonald, presenting information about the work of SNO and SNOLAB.
    One of the most popular features of the New Eyes on the Universe exhibit is a life-size virtual display of Art McDonald, presenting information about the work of SNO and SNOLAB.
  • Art McDonald acknowledges the contributions of Gordon and Patricia Gray, the sponsors of the Gordon and Patricia Gray Chair in Particle Astrophysics, a position he once held at Queen's University.
    Art McDonald acknowledges the contributions of Gordon and Patricia Gray, the sponsors of the Gordon and Patricia Gray Chair in Particle Astrophysics, a position he once held at Queen's University.
  • Members of the Queen's and Kingston communities tour through the New Eyes on the Universe exhibit during a special opening event at the Agnes Etherington Art Centre on Friday, May 26.
    Members of the Queen's and Kingston communities tour through the New Eyes on the Universe exhibit during a special opening event at the Agnes Etherington Art Centre on Friday, May 26.
  • Art McDonald cuts the ribbon to officially open the New Eyes on the Universe exhibit alongside, from left, Principal Daniel Woolf, student Elizabeth Fletcher, MPP for Kingston and the Islands Sophie Kiwala and David Walker, Chair, Executive Committee for Queen’s 175th Anniversary.
    Art McDonald cuts the ribbon to officially open the New Eyes on the Universe exhibit alongside, from left, Principal Daniel Woolf, student Elizabeth Fletcher, MPP for Kingston and the Islands Sophie Kiwala and David Walker, Chair, Executive Committee for Queen’s 175th Anniversary.

Nobel Laureate Arthur McDonald helped kick off an interactive exhibit highlighting the discoveries of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) project and the ongoing experiments by Queen’s researchers at the SNOLAB underground facility.

[Queen's 175th anniversary]
Queen's 175th anniversary

A special event was held Friday at the Agnes Etherington Art Centre where the exhibit will be on display from May 27-July 7. Queen’s is hosting the exhibit as part of its 175th anniversary celebrations, which will conclude later this summer.

Dr. McDonald shared the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics for proving that solar neutrinos change their flavour en route to Earth, an important discovery for explaining the structure of the universe and the nature of matter.

The exhibit, which debuted July 1, 2016 at Canada House in London before touring across Canada, features 40 panels presenting the history and development of SNO and SNOLAB, located two kilometres below the surface in the Vale Creighton Mine near Sudbury. Video kiosks allow visitors to explore themes and offer a virtual tour of SNOLAB, while, through a life-size virtual display, Dr. McDonald presents information about the work of SNO and SNOLAB and his perspective on the future.

Exhibit artifacts include unique detector components developed especially for SNO, as well as a scale model of the SNO detector.

Admission to the exhibit and the Agnes is free for everyone.

The SNOLAB Institute is operated under a trust agreement between Queen’s University, Carleton University, University of Alberta, Laurentian University, Université de Montréal, and Vale, and includes external and international membership from both academic and industrial sectors. 

Special Hong Kong ceremony celebrates Asia-Pacific ties

Justice Kin Kee Pang, Arts’70 (centre), who is a long-time Queen’s volunteer leader and former judge of the Court of First Instance of the High Court in Hong Kong, received an honorary degree at the ceremony in Hong Kong May 20. Chancellor Jim Leech (second from right) and Principal Daniel Woolf (right) presented the honour, along with Queen's Rector Cam Yung and Dean Bill Flanagan (Law). (Photo by Michael Pat)

A special re-convocation ceremony in Hong Kong this past weekend provided the perfect opportunity for Queen’s to reconnect with alumni in the Asia-Pacific region during the university’s 175th anniversary year and to deepen ties with current and potential partners in the area.

Queen's in the World

Several Queen’s senior leaders – including Chancellor Jim Leech, Principal Daniel Woolf, Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) Benoit-Antoine Bacon, and Associate Vice-Principal (International) Kathy O’Brien – joined alumni from the area for the celebrations.

“Queen’s has a strong presence in the Asia-Pacific region, and with these special celebrations, held to mark the university’s 175th anniversary, we wanted to provide those who have attended Queen’s with an opportunity to reconnect with the university,” says Principal Woolf. “The weekend in Hong Kong was also a chance to strengthen Queen’s presence, and re-affirm the university’s commitment to international initiatives in the region.”

At the ceremony on Saturday, Queen’s presented an honorary degree to Justice Kin Kee Pang, Arts’70, who is a long-time Queen’s volunteer leader and former judge of the Court of First Instance of the High Court in Hong Kong. At the event, 120 alumni re-affirmed their degrees and connection to Queen’s, each receiving a card with a Queen’s alumni pin and a special 175th celebratory pin. At a gala dinner in the evening, Queen’s Professor Emeritus and Nobel Laureate Art McDonald provided a keynote address, and senior leaders spoke about recent Queen’s highlights and goals for the future.

Principal Woolf addresses the crowd at the re-convocation ceremony in Hong Kong. (Photo by Michael Pat)

“Queen’s is thriving today, but we need to keep our eye on the future. And the future is global,” said Provost Bacon in his address. “How present and impactful is Queen’s internationally? How diverse and inclusive are we? How are we contributing to solving global challenges in climate, social issues, or food and water? Queen’s is asking these questions today so that we remain a premier destination in the future.”

The trip to Asia provided the opportunity for Queen’s to strengthen connections in China as well. The university has bilateral exchange and study-abroad partnerships with 20 Chinese institutions, and Queen’s continues to explore new academic program opportunities and potential research collaborations.

Following events in Hong Kong, the provost, along with Ms. O’Brien, travelled to Guangzhou, Shanghai, and Qingdao. They met with partners at Guangzhou’s South China Normal University (SCNU), which recently signed an agreement with Queen’s Faculty of Education to collaborate on a dual degree master’s program.

In Shanghai, they met with longstanding partners, Fudan University and Tongji University, renewing a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with Tongji. The provost also hosted an alumni event in Shanghai. In Qingdao tomorrow, Provost Bacon and Ms. O’Brien will sign a three-way MOU with Qingdao University and the Qingdao Municipal Government to explore areas of mutual interest in mental health research and mental health services in China.

Internationalization is one of the four pillars of the Queen’s University Strategic Framework 2014–2019. The Comprehensive International Plan was launched in August 2015 to help the university build on its international strengths and direct future internationalization efforts. The plan’s goals include strengthening Queen’s international research engagement and creating more opportunities for student mobility through academic exchange and study-abroad programs. The plan also aims to attract high-quality international students to Queen’s and to increase international educational opportunities on Queen’s campus. Learn more on the International website.

 

Exhibit offers interactive look at Nobel Prize-winning research

The Queen’s and Kingston communities will soon have the opportunity to see where Nobel Laureate Art McDonald and his team conducted their ground-breaking physics experiments without travelling two kilometres underground. 

[Dr. McDonald with SNOLAB collaborators]
An upcoming exhibit will explore the new experiments that current Queen's researchers and students (pictured above) are conducting at the SNOLAB underground facility in Sudbury. (Photo by Bernard Clark) 

The interactive exhibit, New Eyes on the Universe, is coming to Queen’s University this spring. The exhibit highlights the discoveries of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) project. Dr. McDonald shared the 2015 Nobel Prize in physics for this experiment that proved that solar neutrinos change their flavour enroute to Earth, an important discovery for explaining the nature of matter and the structure of the universe.

New Eyes on the Universe also explores the ways in which the current SNOLAB facilities and experiments continue to push the frontiers in particle astrophysics.

“The exhibit is a wonderful way to bring the Queen’s community closer to the work our team did in Sudbury as well as the research that continues at the facility,” Dr. McDonald says. “We are excited to share the exhibit with the local region as well as with many of our colleagues who will come to campus for the annual congress of the Canadian Association of Physicists in June.”

[Queen's 175th logo]
Queen's 175th anniversary

Queen’s is hosting the exhibit as part of its 175th anniversary celebrations, which will conclude later this summer.

New Eyes on the Universe is a fitting way to cap our 175th anniversary,” says Principal Daniel Woolf. “Over the past year, we have reflected on Queen’s monumental contributions, while also contemplating what the future holds for the university. Similarly, this exhibit allows visitors to celebrate Dr. McDonald and his colleagues’ outstanding accomplishments and learn about the ways in which Queen’s researchers, now and in the future, will play a leading role in unlocking the mysteries of the universe.”

Intimate and Interactive

The exhibit’s 40 panels present spectacular images of the history and development of SNO and SNOLAB, which is located two kilometres below the surface in the Vale Creighton Mine near Sudbury, Ont. Video kiosks let visitors explore themes and offer a virtual tour of SNOLAB. Through a life-size virtual display, Dr. McDonald presents information about the work of SNO and SNOLAB and his perspective on the future.

The exhibit also includes a section on the 2015 Nobel Prize in physics, which Dr. McDonald shared with Japanese physicist Takaaki Kajita. There are images from Nobel Week in Stockholm and a display of the Nobel Medal, citation, and artwork.

Exhibit artifacts include unique detector components developed especially for SNO, as well as a scale model of the SNO detector. Another area of the exhibit shares interviews with young scientists who started their scientific careers with SNO.

New Eyes on the Universe will be on display in the atrium of the Agnes Etherington Art Centre from May 27-July 7. Admission to the exhibit and the Agnes is free for everyone.

The New Eyes on the Universe exhibit is owned and circulated by SNOLAB. The exhibit debuted on July 1, 2016 at Canada House, Trafalgar Square in London, and it is touring across Canada this year.

The SNOLAB Institute is operated under a trust agreement between Queen’s University, Carleton University, University of Alberta, Laurentian University, Université de Montréal, and Vale, and includes external and international membership from both academic and industrial sectors. 

175th anniversary: Recognizing the past, with eye to the future

 

  • Nathan Brinklow, a lecturer in the Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures, speaks after presenting Principal Daniel Woolf with a friendship wampum on behalf of the clan mothers at Tyendinaga and the Grandmother’s Council in Kingston.
    Nathan Brinklow, a lecturer in the Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures, speaks after presenting Principal Daniel Woolf with a friendship wampum on behalf of the clan mothers at Tyendinaga and the Grandmother’s Council in Kingston.
  • The Whispering Wind Drum Group performed a traditional honour song during the special Senate meeting recognizing the 175th anniversary of the first class starting at Queen’s.
    The Whispering Wind Drum Group performed a traditional honour song during the special Senate meeting recognizing the 175th anniversary of the first class starting at Queen’s.
  • Paul Banfield, University Archivist, presented a short history of Queen’s Royal Charter, which was on display during the special Senate meeting recognizing the 175th anniversary of the first class.
    Paul Banfield, University Archivist, presented a short history of Queen’s Royal Charter, which was on display during the special Senate meeting recognizing the 175th anniversary of the first class.
  • A special Senate meeting recognizing the 175th anniversary of the first class starting at Queen’s was held in Wallace Hall on Tuesday, March 7.
    A special Senate meeting recognizing the 175th anniversary of the first class starting at Queen’s was held in Wallace Hall on Tuesday, March 7.

A special Senate meeting recognizing the 175th anniversary of the first class starting at Queen’s took on extra meaning Tuesday afternoon.

[Queen's 175th logo]In his address to Senate, Principal Daniel Woolf acknowledged Queen’s presence on the traditional lands of the Haudenosaunee and the Anishnaabe Peoples. He also reiterated the university’s commitment to building good relations with Aboriginal Peoples and creating meaningful change on campus.

“For too long, our country’s mistreatment and segregation of Indigenous Peoples has been hidden from view, only to perpetuate and contribute to their suffering. To move forward in healing, we must acknowledge Queen’s own history as an institution that participated in a colonial tradition that caused great harm to Indigenous People,” said Principal Woolf, who also chairs Senate.

In the coming weeks, the Truth and Reconciliation Task Force will release its final report, which will contain recommendations that address federal calls to action and broader themes at the university of relationship-building, changing perspectives and policy, and promoting an awareness of the rights, histories, and contemporary issues of Indigenous Peoples. Principal Woolf told Senate that he is committed to dedicating the time and resources required to ensure the long-term sustainability of the recommendations.

“The Queen’s community can and must change the narrative,” he said. “By taking steps to ensure that Indigenous histories are shared, recognizing that all students can benefit from Indigenous knowledge, and by creating culturally validating learning environments, we can begin to reduce barriers to education and create a more welcoming, inclusive, and diverse university.”

The special Senate meeting began with a traditional Mohawk-language opening by Nathan Brinklow, a lecturer in the Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures. Mr. Brinklow presented Principal Woolf with a friendship wampum on behalf of the Clan mothers at Tyendinaga and the Grandmother’s Council in Kingston. The wampum belt will be placed at the head table at every Senate meeting as a reminder that Senate meetings take place on traditional Anishinaabe and Haudenosaunee Territory. The Whispering Wind Drum Group also performed a traditional honour song.

Following the principal’s statement, Queen’s Senate approved the naming of March 7 as “First Class Day.” At the first Senate meeting on March 7, 1842, 12 students were presented to Senate for consideration for matriculation.

Paul Banfield, University Archivist, presented a short history of Queen’s Royal Charter.

175th anniversary: A day to remember

On March 7, 1842, the first students arrived at a house at 67 Colborne St. to begin their studies. Their classes were led by Peter Colin Campbell, the first professor hired by Queen’s who taught classical literature, and Thomas Liddell, Queen’s founding principal and professor of divinity.

[175th anniversary logo]

Queen’s will mark the 175th anniversary of this important moment in its history with a special meeting of Senate on Tuesday, March 7. In 1842, Senate would have admitted the small group – approximately 15 students – to Queen’s.

[House at 67 Colborne Street]
As detailed on the Queen's 175th anniversary website, Queen's campus consisted of this rented house 67 Colborne St. when Senate admitted the first group of students on March 7, 1842. (Queen's University Archives)

Several activities will take place during the special Senate meeting. After the academic procession and traditional opening, there will be a presentation of a friendship wampum and a performance by the Whispering Wind Drum Group.

University Archivist Paul Banfield will offer a short history of Queen’s Royal Charter and Senate. Principal Emeritus William Leggett will reflect on his experience as chair of Senate.

The meeting, which will take place in Wallace Hall in the John Deutsch University Centre beginning at 3:30 pm, is open to the public. Those interested in attending are asked to contact the University Secretariat by emailing senate@queensu.ca.

Queen’s is celebrating its 175th anniversary in 2016-17. Many units, departments, and groups across campus are planning special events or incorporating the 175th anniversary into their existing activities. To learn more, visit the Queen’s 175th website.

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