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Investing in research

QROF supports cancer research 
Last year, 20 Queen’s faculty members received QROF grants, including Parvin Mousavi (School of Computing) whose project is advancing multi-parametric imaging for augmenting the diagnosis and management of prostate cancer. A recipient of the International Fund, Dr. Mousavi is working within the Advanced Multimodal Image-guided Operating (AMIGO) suite at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH), Harvard Medical School.
According to the American and Canadian Cancer Societies, 262,000 new cases of prostate cancer are diagnosed annually and these numbers are expected to double by 2025 when the baby boomer generation reaches the age of peak prevalence. Dr. Mousavi’s research will contribute to better diagnoses and risk stratification of prostate cancer, and help decrease its mortality and morbidity.

Letters of intent are being requested for two funding competitions open to researchers and scholars at Queen’s University – the 2017-2018 Queen’s Research Opportunities Funds (QROF) and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council Institutional Grant (SIG) competitions.

The QROF provides researchers and scholars financial support to accelerate their programs and research goals, and offers opportunities to leverage external funding to build on areas of institutional research strength. Through a federal government block grant provided to Queen’s by SSHRC, the recently-redesigned SIG competition supports social sciences and humanities researchers with funding for research project development, pilot study work, or to attend or run knowledge-mobilization activities like workshops, seminars or scholarly conferences.

“Championing research and scholarly excellence is a cornerstone of our mission at Queen’s University,” says John Fisher, Interim Vice-Principal (Research). “The QROF competition allows us to make our largest internal investment in research, scholarship and innovation by supporting researchers striving to take their work to the next level. With SSHRC's recent redesign of the allotment of funding from the SIG, we are poised to reinvigorate research in the social sciences and humanities, further strengthening scholarship in the SSHRC disciplines."

The QROF competition consists of four funds:

  • The Research Leaders’ Fund – for strategic institutional commitments to aspirational research in support of the university’s research strengths and priorities
  • The International Fund – to assist in augmenting the university’s international reputation through increased global engagement
  • The Arts Fund – designed to support artists and their contributions to the scholarly community and to advancing Queen’s University
  • The Post-Doctoral Fund – to both attract outstanding post-doctoral fellows to Queen’s and to support their contributions to research and to the university

The SIG competition provides funding through two granting programs:

  • SSHRC Explore Grants – support social sciences and humanities researchers at any career stage with funds to allow for small-scale research project development or pilot work, or to allow for participation of students in research projects
  • SSHRC Exchange Grants – support the organization of small-scale knowledge mobilization activities in order to encourage collaboration and dissemination of research results both within and beyond the academic community, as well as allow researchers to attend or present research at scholarly conferences and other venues to advance their careers and promote the exchange of ideas

The Office of the Vice-Principal (Research) has issued calls for letters of intent, and successful candidates will be invited to submit a full application. Information on each of the funds and the application processes can be found on the on the website of the Office of the Vice-Principal (Research). For more information, email ferrism@queensu.ca.

Leaders in the classroom

The 2017 winners of the Principal’s Teaching and Learning Awards have been announced with awards being handed out in educational leadership, student services, and curriculum development.

The awards, created in 2015, recognize individuals and teams who have shown exceptional innovation and leadership in teaching and learning on campus and are administered by the Centre for Teaching and Learning (CTL).

“This year’s award recipients are a dedicated group of faculty and staff and I commend them on their deep commitment to enhancing the student learning experience at Queen’s,” says Principal Daniel Woolf. “Across campus there is a great deal of work taking place to foster excellence in teaching and learning and I am delighted that these awards can help raise the profile of this initiative.”

Each award celebrates a different aspect of teaching and learning, such as educational leadership and curriculum development.

Formal presentation of the awards will take place at the Teaching Awards Reception to be held in January 2018.

The recipients are:

Educational Leadership Award
Dr. J. Damon Dagnone, Department of Emergency Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences

Over the past two and a half years, Damon Dagnone has overseen a fundamental transformation in the design and delivery of postgraduate medical education (PGME) across the 29 medical and surgical specialty and subspecialty training programs at Queen’s. As the School of Medicine’s Faculty Lead for implementation of Competency-Based Medical Education (CBME) Dr. Dagnone has been instrumental in leading a medical school-wide transition to a new model of postgraduate training for physicians, as Queen’s became the first school in Canada to fully adopt this new educational paradigm. This education innovation has required a massive shift in the School of Medicine’s approach to education, and early on it was recognized that this effort would require a dedicated Faculty Lead to spearhead the transition. Dr. Dagnone was the lead author of the school-wide FIRE (Fundamental Innovation in Residency Education) proposal to the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, and his active advocacy was a key contributor to its ultimate approval which allowed Queen’s to move forward with CBME implementation. Beyond his leadership and engagement with stakeholders at Queen’s, Dr. Dagnone has also engaged on an ongoing basis with the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada and its various specialty committees, the College of Family Physicians of Canada, and other Postgraduate Medical Education offices at medical schools across Canada.

Michael Condra Outstanding Student Service Award
Dr. Renée Fitzpatrick, School of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences

Dr. Renée Fitzpatrick has been the Director of Student Affairs for the Queen’s School of Medicine since 2014. A child and adolescent psychiatrist, Dr. Fitzpatrick is an experienced and award-winning educator. The beginning of her tenure as director of student affairs coincided with heightened student concern about ‘burnout.’ Early on, Dr. Fitzpatrick helped facilitate a student-organized initiative, ‘Wellness Month,’ an idea that has now been adopted at medical schools across Canada utilizing the hashtag #keepsmewell. Subsequently, she has developed four ‘wellness half-days,’ which focus on self-awareness about awareness , self-care skills appropriate for the developmental stages of students at key points in the curriculum as well as awareness of and responsibility for developing resilience. In addition, Dr. Fitzpatrick has developed a coordinated approach integrating wellness, academic and career advising in an intentional fashion for all students across the four years of the curriculum. Students participate in regular meetings with faculty to provide support in these domains in an individualized fashion. As part of the re-imagining of the Learner Wellness program she has been instrumental in the introduction of an embedded counsellor and is an active participant in national meeting focussing on student wellness and student affairs.

Curriculum Development Award
School of Policy Studies team
Dr. Rachel Laforest
Dr. Robert Wolfe
Joel Jahrsdorfer
Andrew Graham
Fatemeh Mayanloo
Fiona Froats

Over the past four years, Rachel Laforest and her team have developed a competency-based curriculum which integrates experiential and problem-based learning to introduce students to the policy process and the role of policy analysis. Starting in 2014, the School of Policy Studies embarked on a curriculum renewal process after a series of external reviews identified the need to adapt the curriculum to reflect the contemporary public policy landscape. This review led to a greater integration of multi-disciplinary perspectives via the introduction of a new foundational course – MPA810. The team’s external engagement and strong links within the community allowed them to build real-world examples into the curriculum by leveraging the study hours that students participate in. It is this combination of classroom learning, community engagement and practical experience that provides students with a rounded and cutting-edge learning environment. The process of curriculum renewal led by Dr. Laforest and her team involved gather a strong evidence base and student were engaged throughout the process. In collaboration with Bob Wolfe, Dr. Laforest is now teaching MPA810, incorporating feedback from faculty and students along the way. 

Certificate in Social Impact for Professionals first of its kind in Canada

Today’s business leaders are increasingly expected to be ready and willing to tackle the most pressing social needs from the environment to human rights, from poverty to civic engagement.

To meet this growing demand the Centre for Social Impact at the Smith School of Business is now offering a Certificate in Social Impact for Professionals to provide today’s business leaders with applicable skills while at the same time fostering professional networks. Led by the centre’s Director and Smith faculty, Tina Dacin, the certificate is the first of its kind in Canada that equips managers with best practice approaches to integrate social impact considerations into core business and organizational strategies.

"Certificate for Social Impact for Professionals"
A first in Canada, the Certificate in Social Impact for Professionals will provide business leaders with best practice approaches to integrate social impact considerations into core business and organizational strategies. (Supplied Photo) 

Since 2004, the Centre for Social Impact has offered students at Smith the Certificate in Social Impact, with more than 500 graduate and undergraduate students earning a certificate alongside their degree programs.

The newly-launched professional program is comprised of two two-day sessions –Social Finance Academy and Leading with Impact – with both hosted at Smith’s Toronto campus. To earn a full certificate, professionals must apply their learning to an independent or team project exploring issues of social impact specific to their workplace.

Joanna Reynolds, Associate Director, Centre for Social Impact, says that while business schools have historically produced great talent in traditional fields such as business development, business management, accounting and marketing, there is a growing expectation that aspects related to sustainable development goals such as climate action, and reducing inequalities, be included in a business education.

The Certificate for Social Impact program has forged such a path and now emerging skill sets are available for working professionals.

“This program and others we offer at the Centre for Social Impact support Smith students and working professionals to gain foresight into how changing social issues will impact their industry and society as a whole and provide them with new skills needed to affect change,” Ms. Reynolds says. “Additionally, gaining insight into how values apply to a changing business and community landscape is critical to navigating competing tensions and uncertain environments. These skills and new mindsets help to equip our graduates to be responsive and effective in their areas of expertise.”

The Social Finance Academy is being offered Nov. 23-24 and the Leading with Impact program is scheduled for Nov. 30-Dec. 1. Registration is currently open.

Under the direction of Dr. Dacin, the Centre for Social Impact is also currently developing the Diversity and Inclusion Professional Series, to be first offered in Spring 2018.

The first session of the series will be the LGBTQ+ Professional Leadership Program.

“The Diversity and Inclusion Series is one way to address and support the diversity gap in senior leadership roles,” says Ms. Reynolds. “While society needs many ways of doing that, one is to build mentorship and peer relationships that support real change in leadership roles. That’s an exciting program for us.”

Subsequent offerings will focus on such topics as Women in Leadership, Indigenous Leadership, and programs for newcomer Canadians, Ms. Reynolds adds.

Other offerings from the Centre for Social Impact include the Social Innovation Bootcamp (Oct. 13-14 and March 9-10), for students to apply solutions to social issues that communities are grappling with  and the Social Impact Summit (Nov. 10-11), a conference program that brings together leading academics and practitioners  from across  Canada. This Summit offers panel discussions, skill building workshops and networking opportunities, for students across Queen’s campus to explore issues and topics in the area of social impact and responsible leadership.

Meeting 'The New India'

  • Provost Benoit-Antoine Bacon and His Excellency Vikas Swarup shake hands at the University Club. (University Communications)
    Provost Benoit-Antoine Bacon and His Excellency Vikas Swarup shake hands at the University Club. (University Communications)
  • The Indian High Commission, Queen's staff, Kingston Mayor Bryan Paterson, and representatives from KEDCO and St. Lawrence College pose for a group photo. (University Communications)
    The Indian High Commission, Queen's staff, Kingston Mayor Bryan Paterson, and representatives from KEDCO and St. Lawrence College pose for a group photo. (University Communications)
  • His Excellency Vikas Swarup provides a lecture on "The New India" to a group of Smith School of Business graduate students, faculty, and other special guests in Goodes Hall. (University Communications)
    His Excellency Vikas Swarup provides a lecture on "The New India" to a group of Smith School of Business graduate students, faculty, and other special guests in Goodes Hall. (University Communications)

Queen’s University graduate students were introduced to “The New India” as part of a delegation visit by the High Commission of India to Canada on Wednesday.

The delegation was led by His Excellency Vikas Swarup, who was named High Commissioner in the spring. The visit marked His Excellency’s first trip to Kingston since taking office. In addition to being a highly respected diplomat and envoy, His Excellency is also a celebrated author – his most famous book, 2005’s Q&A, hit North American theatres in 2008 as Slumdog Millionaire.

During his day-long stop, he attended a lunch hosted by Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) Benoit-Antoine Bacon, presented a lecture to graduate students at the Smith School of Business, and learned about Queen’s research priorities and the recent activities of the Dunin-Deshpande Queen’s Innovation Centre working with the Deshpande Foundation in Hubballi, India. The day concluded with a networking reception hosted by the Kingston Economic Development Corporation (KEDCO) at the Agnes Etherington Art Centre.

“It was an honour to welcome the High Commissioner to Queen’s and to share with him some of the exciting research and innovation we are doing at Queen’s,” says Dr. Bacon. “We were very pleased that His Excellency took the time to discuss the exciting developments taking place in his country, and to elaborate on the opportunities for Queen’s and for Canada to partner with India. Expanding our relationship with India, and having meaningful international “at home” experiences for our students, such as His Excellency’s lecture, are integral parts of our Comprehensive International Plan and I want to thank everyone, and in particular our Mayor Bryan Paterson, who made the day a success.”

His Excellency’s lecture focused on the changing dynamics within the nation of more than 1.3 billion people. He spoke to the existing relationship between Canada and India, which he hoped to make “the defining partnership” of the coming century, and areas of future growth and collaboration.

"India is a very exciting place right now because it is transforming at a rapid pace,” says His Excellency. “In the new India, the most important thing is going to be partnerships. We have a massive requirement of skill...at a time when the world is aging, India has a young population and a youthful population...We are looking for partnerships with premier international universities like Queen's, so I think there is a lot we can do together."

During the visit by the High Commissioner, Dr. Bacon informed the delegation that he will make a trip to India in January to learn more about the work of the Deshpande Foundation. 

Mean green protein

 'Team Duckweed' features, from left, Alex Stothart, Hana Chaudhury, Gilad Streiner, Santiago Spencer, and Rachel Amirault. These five Queen's students are participating in the Queen's Innovation Connector Summer Initiative, which is helping to kickstart their business. (Supplied Photo)

It’s full of protein and fibre. It’s a leafy green, and a rich source of Vitamin A and B. It’s a hearty plant – you could even say it grows like a weed.

The one remaining question on the mind of Queen’s students Hana Chaudhury (Comm’18), Rachel Amirault (Sc’18), Gilad Streiner (Artsci’17, Sc’17), Alex Stothart (Sc’18), and Santi Spencer (Sc’18) is: would you like to try some duckweed?

“We initially came across duckweed as a commercial opportunity from [an industry trend report] that highlighted alternative, plant-based protein sources,” explains Hana. “After conducting research, we were surprised – and delighted – to find that duckweed as food is a largely untapped market in North America. We saw it as both a great market opportunity, and as a chance to provide a much more sustainable protein alternative with little sacrifice on nutrition and a lower environmental footprint than most plant-based protein alternatives.”

The members of ‘Team Duckweed’ are currently participating in the Queen’s Innovation Centre Summer Initiative (QICSI), a summer-long bootcamp for budding entrepreneurs. They are using the time, and the feedback of QICSI mentors, to validate their market, conduct tests, research their product, and design the system that will eventually help them grow their crop. Hana and the team are grateful for the opportunity they have had through the QICSI program to learn these lessons and develop their business in a safe environment.

A successful expedition to gather duckweed. The next place you see it may be a store shelf near you. (Supplied Photo).

“It’s an unparalleled opportunity for young people interested in entrepreneurship,” says Hana. “We have loved having the feedback from mentors who have worked in this field and have a wealth of knowledge to provide us with, as well as the quality of the speakers and entrepreneurship education the program has provided. We quickly built a strong community with the rest of our cohort, and seeing everyone’s hard work definitely fuels the competitive fire and has pushed us to work harder.”

But, of course, before their business gets off the ground there’s that million dollar question: how does it taste?

“We have tried duckweed in small quantities and, to us, it tasted like nothing,” adds Hana. “Granted, when we taste it in larger quantities we will probably get a better sense of its taste profile. We initially began with the idea of developing a taste neutral nutritional powder that could be added to any meal in small quantities. We are exploring some other options such as incorporating it into a sauce, breads, or another food product, but are still in the process of researching what end-product consumers will gravitate towards most.”

QICSI runs until mid-August, and ‘Team Duckweed’ is one of eight teams participating in this year’s bootcamp. Learn more about QICSI at queensu.ca/innovationcentre

The next superfood? A photo of duckweed harvested by 'Team Duckweed'. (Supplied Photo)

 

Honorary Degree: Stephen J.R. Smith

  • Stephen J.R. Smith holds up his honorary degree from Queen's University during Tuesday's Spring Convocation ceremony at the ARC, with Rector Cam Yung, Principal Daniel Woolf, and Chancellor Jim Leech.
    Stephen J.R. Smith holds up his honorary degree from Queen's University during Tuesday's Spring Convocation ceremony at the ARC, with Rector Cam Yung, Principal Daniel Woolf, and Chancellor Jim Leech.
  • Stephen J.R. Smith shares a laugh with, from left, Rector Cam Yung, Principal Daniel Woolf, Chancellor Jim Leech and David Saunders, Dean of the Smith School of Business, as he prepares to be hooded at Tuesday's Spring Convocation ceremony.
    Stephen J.R. Smith shares a laugh with, from right, Rector Cam Yung, Principal Daniel Woolf, Chancellor Jim Leech and David Saunders, Dean of the Smith School of Business, as he prepares to be hooded at Tuesday's Spring Convocation ceremony.
  • Entrepreneur and philanthropist Stephen J.R. Smith delivers a speech after receiving an honorary degree from Queen's during Tuesday's Spring Convocation ceremony at the Athletics and Recreation Centre.
    Entrepreneur and philanthropist Stephen J.R. Smith delivers a speech after receiving an honorary degree from Queen's during Tuesday's Spring Convocation ceremony at the Athletics and Recreation Centre.
  • Family and friends fill the main gym of the Athletics and Recreation Centre for Tuesday afternoon's Spring Convocation ceremony for graduates of the commerce program at the Smith School of Business as well as master's and PhD recipients.
    Family and friends fill the main gym of the Athletics and Recreation Centre for Tuesday afternoon's Spring Convocation ceremony for graduates of the commerce program at the Smith School of Business as well as master's and PhD recipients.

One of Canada’s leading entrepreneurs in the financial services industry, Stephen J.R. Smith (Sc’72) received an honorary degree from Queen’s on Tuesday, May 30 as part of Spring Convocation.

Renowned for innovation in information technology and financial structuring in the Canadian mortgage industry, Mr. Smith is also an avid supporter of post-secondary education. In 2015, he made a $50-million investment in business education at Queen’s, the largest-ever gift to any business school in Canada. In recognition of this investment the Queen’s School of Business was renamed the Stephen J.R. Smith School of Business.

Mr. Smith earned a Bachelor of Science (Honours) in electrical engineering from Queen’s in 1972 and is the co-founder, chairman and chief executive officer of First National Financial Corporation, Canada’s largest non-bank lender of residential and commercial mortgages. He is also chairman and co-owner of Canada Guaranty Mortgage Insurance, the country’s third-largest mortgage insurance provider.

A live feed of each Spring Convocation ceremony will begin approximately 15 minutes before the scheduled start of each event. For a full schedule of the ceremonies, visit the website of the Office of the University Registrar.

Spring convocation gets underway

  • Honorary degree recipient James Rutka (Meds’81) speaks to the graduates from the School of Medicine and School of Nursing during Thursday afternoon's convocation ceremony.
    Honorary degree recipient James Rutka (Meds’81) speaks to the graduates from the School of Medicine and School of Nursing during Thursday afternoon's convocation ceremony.
  • Chancellor Jim Leech congratulates and poses for a photo with a graduate after she received her PhD during Thursday's Spring Convocation ceremony.
    Chancellor Jim Leech congratulates and poses for a photo with a graduate after she received her PhD during Thursday's Spring Convocation ceremony.
  • Deputy Provost Teri Shearer, Chancellor Jim Leech, and Rector Cam Yung preside over the first of 21 ceremonies for Spring Convocation at Queen's on Thursday, May 25.
    Deputy Provost Teri Shearer, Chancellor Jim Leech, and Rector Cam Yung preside over the first of 21 ceremonies for Spring Convocation at Queen's on Thursday, May 25.
  • Graduands give a round of applause to their family and friends who have supported them throughout their studies during Thursday's first ceremony of Spring Convocation.
    Graduands give a round of applause to their family and friends who have supported them throughout their studies during Thursday's first ceremony of Spring Convocation.
  • Graduands, family, and friends fill Grant Hall on the opening day of Spring Convocation at Grant Hall, on Thursday, May 25.
    Graduands, family, and friends fill Grant Hall on the opening day of Spring Convocation at Grant Hall, on Thursday, May 25.

Spring Convocation got underway at Queen’s University with the first two of 21 of ceremonies being held at Grant Hall on Thursday, May 25.

The first ceremony featured graduates from a number of Smith School of Business graduate programs while the afternoon featured the School of Medicine and School of Nursing.

During the afternoon ceremony an honorary degree was conferred upon James Rutka (Meds’81), a pediatric neurosurgeon and professor in the University of Toronto’s Department of Surgery.

A live feed of each ceremony will begin approximately 15 minutes before the scheduled start of each event. 

For a full schedule of the ceremonies, visit the website of the Office of the University Registrar.

Smith international program offers diverse dynamic

Queen's in the World

Angela James knows first-hand and through years of watching students come and go on international exchanges that “growth happens on the fringes, when you’re pushing yourself and being challenged.”

Ms. James, Director of the Centre for International Management in Smith School of Business, felt it herself when she backpacked through Europe, and throughout her career in international education, which began at the University of Waterloo working in recruitment and as an academic adviser, a job that saw her welcoming and sending out exchange students.

“I was really shocked to see the transformation of students, both those who had gone on exchange overseas or who came to Canada to study. I thought, ‘this is something we can’t teach in the classroom,’” she says.

The Centre for International Management team includes, from left to right, Aileen Dong, Giovanna Crocco, Tenay Bartzis, Jacoba Franks, Angela James, Alison Darling, Alison Doyle, Kerri Regan, and Alina Jumabaeva. (Missing from the photo is Emily Mantha, who is on leave until 2018.) The staff members bring a wealth of expertise, including fluency in French, Italian, Korean, Mandarin, Russian, and Spanish.

Now at Smith, Ms. James provides support, along with a team of eight others, to about 1,200 incoming and outgoing students every year (the largest international mobility program for exchange at Queen’s).

Within the Centre for International Management, there are two units, one providing support to the Commerce program and another supporting the school’s graduate and professional master’s programs, including the Master of International Business (MIB), the MBA, the Master of Finance-Beijing, and the Saudi Industrial Development Fund program.

Since Ms. James began as director 12 years ago, and through focused goals set by Dean David Saunders, the centre has gradually increased the number of students participating in exchange and the number of schools Smith partners with around the world.

“When I started, it was just me and one other person. We were solely doing Commerce exchange and we were exchanging just over 200 students, with about 30 partners. Now, we have close to 120 partners in 35 countries, supporting about 1,200 students,” explains Ms. James, who worked at the Bader International Study Centre in the U.K. in admissions before joining Smith.

Diverse dynamic

The benefit of such a well-developed international program is the diversity of people and perspectives in the classroom, with upper-year classes almost 50 per cent exchange students and a big push within the school to keep bringing in a more diverse faculty complement.

“Professors and students both love the dynamic this creates and they are insisting on making it more diverse,” says Ms. James.

For international students, she explains, Smith and Queen’s are very attractive options. Many of them come from top business schools found in large city centres around the world, and they love the small size of Kingston, the community spirit at Queen’s, and small class sizes at Smith. There is also great opportunity to interact and make friends with Canadian students through group work and through a student-led Exchange and Transfer Committee, which organizes events with the goal of integrating exchange students into life at Queen’s.

For domestic students, going out on exchange is an opportunity to launch themselves away from the safety net of Queen’s (and the busy social life) and gain new perspectives on the world, politics, and global affairs. Every student who comes to Smith is guaranteed a spot on exchange if they want it, and because international education is an integral part of the MIB program, it is integrated into each student’s experience, either through exchange or one of 11 double degree programs.

“Change happens tenfold on exchange. Often, they are living in a big city centre and experiencing culture shock and missing home. They are able to better define who they are as a person,” says Ms. James. “They come back with a new sense of self-confidence and independence. And we help them verbalize the change they’ve gone through and translate their experience so they can include that on their resume. The international experience remains vivid for a long time – it lingers longer, with students reflecting on it for years to come.”

***

The Centre for International Management recently ran a photography contest for students on exchange. View their impressive photos on the Smith Facebook page.

Internationalization is one of the four pillars of the Queen’s University Strategic Framework 2014–2019. The Comprehensive International Plan was launched in August 2015 to help the university build on its international strengths and direct future internationalization efforts. The plan’s goals include strengthening Queen’s international research engagement and creating more opportunities for student mobility through academic exchange and study-abroad programs. The plan also aims to attract high-quality international students to Queen’s and to increase international educational opportunities on Queen’s campus. Learn more on the International website.

 

Changes to senior academic leadership mandates

Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) Benoit-Antoine Bacon has announced the expansion/refocusing or extension of four senior academic leadership mandates.

“The mandates of senior academic leadership must evolve in order to best meet the needs and aspirations of the university. Accordingly, the roles and responsibilities for both Teri Shearer and Martha Whitehead have been updated and enhanced to reflect the goals and aims of their positions,” says Dr. Bacon. “I am also pleased that both Dean Bill Flanagan and Dean David Saunders have agreed to extend their positions for one and two years respectively, and will continue to provide the leadership that Queen’s has come to rely upon.”

[Teri Shearer]To reflect the deputy provost’s new focus on, and accountability for, equity, diversity and inclusion on campus, Teri Shearer’s title has been modified to deputy provost (academic operations and inclusion). In this modified role, Dr. Shearer will champion equity, diversity and inclusion in all aspects of the university’s mission. She will oversee the Human Rights and Equity Offices, lead the university’s response to the crucial reports from the Principal’s Implementation Committee on Racism, Diversity and Inclusion and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Taskforce, and oversee the establishment of the Aboriginal Initiatives Office.

The deputy provost’s key operational responsibilities in overseeing academic appointments and curriculum development as chair of the Senate Committee on Academic Development will also ensure there is direct oversight for enhancing equity, diversity and inclusion across the university’s academic operations. As the provost's second-in-command, the deputy provost (academic operations and inclusion) is uniquely positioned to lead broad institutional change through close working relationships with the deans, vice-provosts and vice-principals.

[Martha Whitehead]Martha Whitehead has been asked to play a more explicit role in the institutional coordination of the university’s various areas of digital strengths, and in further planning to meet Queen’s current and future digital needs. Accordingly, her title has been revised to vice-provost (digital planning) and university librarian. Working hand in hand with the chief information officer and associate vice-principal (information technology services), Ms. Whitehead will help to bring together all stakeholders and lead discussions towards laying the foundation of a digital strategy for Queen’s.

[Bill Flanagan]At Principal Daniel Woolf’s request, Bill Flanagan has agreed to remain in the position of dean, Faculty of Law for an additional year until June 30, 2019, following the conclusion of his third term on June 30, 2018. Mr. Flanagan was initially appointed dean of the Faculty of Law in 2005, and has since seen the faculty through a period of unprecedented growth and development. 

[David Saunders]At the principal's request, David Saunders has agreed to serve for two additional years, until June 30, 2020, as dean of the Smith School of Business. Under Dr. Saunders’ strategic leadership, the business school has experienced dramatic growth and surge in reputation, and has expanded its footprint in both Kingston and Toronto. In 2015, the school received a $50 million donation from Canadian entrepreneur Stephen Smith – the largest gift to a business school in Canada – and in recognition, was named the Stephen J.R. Smith School of Business.

 

Delivering on the pitch

The Dunin-Deshpande Queen’s Innovation Centre (DDQIC) recently handed out a total of $28,000 to six companies that participated in its first-ever regional pitch competition.

“The support of the Dunin and Deshpande Foundations makes it possible to provide this type of financial support to QyourVenture and to support ventures in southeastern Ontario,” says Greg Bavington, Executive Director, Dunin-Deshpande Queen’s Innovation Centre.

[Greg Bavington with members of TimberWolf]
TimberWolf Cycles representatives David Timan (Sc'13) and Caitlin Willis (Com'09) receive feedback from Greg Bavington, Executive Director, Dunin-Deshpande Queen’s Innovation Centre, during the recent regional pitch competition. (Submitted photo)

DDQIC hosted the regional pitch competition with the goal of supporting early-stage companies based at Queen’s and the surrounding area.

The pitch competition was open to anyone with a business idea who has not already received more than $5,000 in support from DDQIC. The field included several companies from QyourVenutre, an acceleration program which supports Queen’s students who want to take their idea to the next level. QyourVenture accepts companies on a regular basis throughout the school year, giving them access to space and training for their business venture.

The pitch competition was judged by members of the DDQIC Global Network in London, England, who connected via videoconference, along with the DDQIC executive team. Chaired by Heather Christie (Artsci’09), the London branch is supported by 13 Queen’s alumni who come from a variety of different professional and education backgrounds. This branch offers support to DDQIC ventures that want to expand into the UK and the rest of Europe.

The winning ventures at the pitch competition included:

TimberWolf Cycles ($5,000) – The company, founded by David Timan (Sc’13), produces high-performance road bikes made from wood. Using a variety of woods, Mr. Timan has designed a bike that softens road vibration while efficiently delivering power to the road through an exceptionally lightweight frame.

Capteur ($5,000) – A QyourVenture company, Capteur enables building operators and maintenance companies to ensure facilities are always clean and operating according to sustainable environmental practices. Cole MacDonald (Sci’19) and Nathan Mah (MEI’17) founded the cloud-based technology start-up.

Robot Missions ($5,000 plus time in SparQ Studios) – Robot Missions, founded by Erin Kennedy, has developed a 3D-printed robot that collects harmful tiny trash debris from shorelines. The company’s robot workshops enhance STEM education for elementary students by applying robotics to the environment.

Your Mobility Innovations ($4,000) – Founded by Loyalist College students Dylan Houlden and Brett Lyons, the company designs and produces products to improve the lives of people with physical disabilities and the elderly. Mr. Lyon, who was born with cerebral palsy and confined to a wheelchair, had the idea for an adjustable grab bar when he was eight-years-old. The founders are trying to turn that idea into a reality, working with several partners including Queen’s Biomedical Innovations Team, PARTEQ, and Queen’s Business Law Clinic.

Pronura ($4,000) – Pronura plans to commercialize a non-invasive, inexpensive method for testing for multiple neurological diseases at the same time – all with accuracy unseen in any current tests. The test, developed by Dr. Douglas P. Munoz of the Queen’s Eye Movement Laboratory, uses an eye-tracker to detect unique biomarkers associated with multiple neurological diseases. Founders Matthew De Sanctis and Adam Palter met in the Master of Entrepreneurship and Innovation program offered by Smith School of Business.

SŌ Seeds ($3,000 plus in-kind donations from the Department of Chemical Engineering) – The venture aims to disrupt the tree-planting industry by replacing saplings with coated super-seeds. SŌ Seeds was founded by five chemical engineering students as part of their innovation and entrepreneurship course under the mentorship of Jim McLellan, Professor and Academic Director, DDQIC.

SWFT ($2,000) – The start-up focuses on developing portable and wireless charging solutions for festivals, stadiums, transit systems, theme parks, and other venues. The service allows patrons to charge their phones without being tethered to charging stations. Friends Greg Fedele (Com’17) and Anish Sharma (Sc’17) founded the company.

Through a variety of programs, services, and resources, the Dunin-Deshpande Queen’s Innovation Centre encourages, enables, and supports the innovation activities of students, professors, entrepreneurs, and Canadian companies. More information about the centre is available online.

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