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Engineering and Applied Science

From diploma to degree

Queen’s University signs partnerships with Canada’s major mining colleges to support the online Bachelor of Mining Engineering Technology program.

Audrey Penner, Vice President Academic and Student Success, Northern College, and David Yokom, Queen's BTech Program Manager.

Queen’s University has partnered with mining programs at three major colleges in Canada through a new diploma-to-degree program designed to help ease the transition from college to university.

In 2016, Queen’s launched its online Bachelor of Mining Engineering Technology (BTech) program, designed for college-educated engineering technologists and technicians looking to advance their career and education. Students gain transfer credits from their college diploma and complete a customized bridging curriculum before being admitted directly into the third year of the program. The program’s blend of online learning, team assignments, and on-site field training means students can study full- or part-time from anywhere in the world.

While the program admits eligible graduates of any college engineering technology program, the newly-signed articulation and transfer agreements between Queen’s and Northern College of Applied Arts and Technology, Cambrian College, and Saskatchewan Polytechnic, map out a clear pathway to graduation for alumni of the partner institutions.

“By formalizing these partnerships, we’ve identified the eligible transfer credits and courses these students will have to take during their bridge year,” explains David Yokom, Queen’s BTech Program Manager. “Candidates from these three colleges will have the advantage of knowing exactly what it will take to earn a Queen’s Bachelor of Mining Engineering Technology degree before they even apply.”

Graduates of programs not covered by articulation and transfer agreements will be assessed upon admission for potential transfer credits and assigned a custom bridging curriculum.

“Partnering with Queen’s is a win-win for us,” says Aaron Klooster, Associate Dean of the School of Trades and Technology at Northern College, which includes the renowned Haileybury School of Mines. “Adding a leading Canadian university credential to Northern College’s well-established name in the mining diploma environment will open big doors for our graduates.”

The Queen’s BTech program is already exceeding enrolment targets and looking to grow further.

“The college to university pathway is one of the fastest growing education markets,” says Mr. Yokom. “This program gives college graduates an opportunity to advance their education, while providing industry with the skilled and experienced staff they need.”

Development of the BTech program was funded by a 2014 grant from the Ontario Council on Articulation and Transfer (ONCAT), with matching funds from the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science at Queen’s University.

Queen's professor wins national chemical engineering award

Kim McAuley is the first woman to be awarded the D.G. Fisher Award by the Canadian Society for Chemical Engineering.

Kim McAuley receiving the D.G. Fisher Award
Kim McAuley, right, Associate Dean of the School Graduate Studies and a professor in chemical engineering, is the first woman to be awarded the D.G. Fisher Award by the Canadian Society for Chemical Engineering. (Supplied Photo)

Queen’s University professor Kim McAuley has received the D.G. Fisher Award by the Canadian Society for Chemical Engineering for her major contributions to the systems and control engineering discipline. Dr. McAuley, who is also the associate dean of the Queen’s School of Graduate Studies, is the first woman to receive the award.

“I feel extremely honoured to receive the D.G. Fisher Award,” says Dr. McAuley. “To be recognized alongside some of the discipline's forbearers is a great privilege, particularly David Bacon and Tom Harris, who mentored me early in my career.”

Both Drs. Bacon and Harris are past recipients of the D.G. Fisher Award from Queen’s University.

Systems and control engineering involves the analysis, design, and optimization of complex systems in all sectors, from robotic manufacturing and assembly lines to petrochemical production and metallurgy. Practitioners use mathematical modeling to inform these large-scale industry processes with the aim of increasing efficiency and lowering production costs. In turn, this helps make products more affordable for consumers and lessens negative environmental impacts.

Dr. McAuley has worked with major chemical and polymer companies like ExxonMobil, DuPont and NOVA Chemicals to improve industrial processes, as well as ‘clean tech’ firms looking to transform existing small-scale processes into large-scale operations.

She recently worked with Enviro Innovate, a company based at Queen’s University’s Innovation Park, which has developed a technology that can remove carbon dioxide from industrial furnace emissions, which can then be used as a feedstock for bio-sourced jet fuel or to create new polymers. Dr. McAuley helped the company by modeling the intricacies of carbon dioxide absorption by small water droplets in the process so Enviro Innovate could better explain the causes of their high carbon dioxide removal rates to companies looking to curb their emissions impact.

“I would not have earned this award without the hard work and enthusiasm of my graduate students – both past and present,” says Dr. McAuley, who currently oversees two Queen’s Chemical Engineering doctoral students and six master's students. “Working alongside them has not only helped me progress my research, but our experiences together have increased my awareness of their needs and goals, and have given me an even better understanding of my role as associate dean of Graduate Studies.”

Canadian systems and control experts are respected around the world and Dr. McAuley believes this global leadership in the field will continue to grow.

“I anticipate future winners of the D.G. Fisher award are amongst my colleagues at Queen’s and our students,” she says. “The industry demand for systems and control professionals continues to grow, particularly due to improvements in computing technology, better access to information and easier ways to collaborate internationally.”

Every March, Dr. McAuley co-organizes a multi-institutional systems and control recruitment event for undergraduates contemplating masters degrees followed by a career in systems and control engineering. This spring will mark the fourth annual event, featuring research from 13 experts from six institutions.

Queen’s engineering grad named Rhodes Scholar

Iain Sander
Iain Sander (Sc’17) has been selected as a 2018 Rhodes Scholar. The Chemical Engineering graduate is the 58th Rhodes Scholar from Queen's. (Supplied Image)

Queen’s University graduate Iain Sander (Sc’17) has been selected as a 2018 Rhodes Scholar.

Mr. Sander, who studied Chemical Engineering at Queen’s, is the university’s 58th Rhodes Scholar and will begin his studies at Oxford University next fall.

The Rhodes Scholarships are considered the oldest and most prestigious international scholarships for outstanding scholars from any academic field of study.

“It is a tremendous honour to have been selected as a 2018 Rhodes Scholar, and I am very grateful to everyone in Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science and the Queen’s community who has supported me throughout the application process,” says Mr. Sander, who is currently studying medicine at the University of Alberta. “I have been fortunate to learn from world-class professors who have consistently challenged me academically and supported me in pursuit my research interests. Queen’s University will always hold a special place in my heart and I am very grateful for relationships I developed and the intellectual and personal growth I experienced during my undergraduate career.”

Mr. Sander graduated from Queen’s with first class honours in Chemical Engineering earlier this year. He received the Medal in Chemical Engineering and the Society for Chemical Industry Merit Award in recognition of achieving the highest standing in his discipline.

At Oxford, he plans to study orthopaedic biomechanics to help improve the health, lives, and independence of individuals with disabilities.

“On behalf of Queen’s University, I am pleased to congratulate Iain on this tremendous accomplishment and opportunity,” says Principal and Vice-Chancellor Daniel Woolf. “I am confident that at Oxford he will apply the skills and experience he has gained at Queen’s, as well as through his years of leadership and community service, to further his contributions to society. I have no doubt he will thrive as a Rhodes Scholar.”

During his time at Queen’s, Mr. Sander volunteered extensively on campus and in the Kingston community, coaching the local Special Olympics swim team, mentoring first-year engineering design teams as they worked on award-winning adaptive buoyancy devices, and tutoring peers in English.

Mr. Sander, who grew up in Lethbridge, Alta., was a Loran Scholar and a recipient of the Queen’s Chancellor’s Scholarship. As part of the Loran Scholar program he spent his community development summer in France as a live-in assistant with L’Arche, an organization for people with intellectual disabilities.

This is the second straight Rhodes Scholar for Queen’s after Claire Gummo, a Political Studies and Gender Studies student, received the prestigious scholarship in 2017.

Funded by the estate of Cecil J. Rhodes (the Rhodes Trusts), 11 Rhodes Scholars are selected each year from across Canada to outstanding students who demonstrate a strong propensity to emerge as “leaders for the world’s future.”

The scholarships to Oxford University are for postgraduate studies or a second bachelor’s degree and cover tuition and fees and provides a stipend to help cover living expenses for two to three years of study while at Oxford.

Learn more about the 2018 Rhodes Scholars.

A holistic view of wellness

The Innovation and Wellness Centre will unite health and wellness resources under one roof.

Workers continue to install glass panels on the south side of the Innovation and Wellness Centre. (Photo by Bernard Clark)
Workers continue to install glass panels on the south side of the Innovation and Wellness Centre. (Photo by Bernard Clark)

Students walking into the Innovation and Wellness Centre (IWC) next fall may find themselves spending a lot of time in the space.

In addition to being a hub for innovation and entrepreneurship resources, and academic labs and classrooms for the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, the IWC will be a place where students maintain and build upon their positive physical and mental health and wellness.

“Physical and mental well-being are important preconditions for academic success,” says Ann Tierney, Vice-Provost and Dean (Student Affairs). “This new facility will provide Queen’s with the flexibility to meet the rising demand across the spectrum of wellness services. Co-locating services that support wellness will emphasize to our students the important relationships that connect mental health, physical well-being, and academic success.”

The creation of the IWC was made possible through $55 million in philanthropic support, including $40 million to revitalize the facility and $15 million specifically earmarked for student wellness and academic programming. In addition, the federal and Ontario governments contributed a combined total of nearly $22 million to this facility.

The IWC will house modernized facilities for Student Wellness Services, configured so that physicians, nurses, and counsellors all share the same space. The main floor will also be home to Queen’s Student Accessibility Services and a new health promotion hub.

“Our hope is that the revitalized, more central location of our services will better engage students in health-promoting activities,” says Jennifer Dods, Executive Director, Student Wellness Services. “The biggest change for us will be a greater integration of our services, which will be noticeable from the moment you walk in the door. Our new space in the IWC will feature one shared reception for our services, which will mean one point of entry and less stigma for students accessing counselling, health, or accessibility supports.”

The IWC will also include an expanded interfaith chaplaincy, the Queen’s University International Centre, refreshed athletics training space including the three existing gyms, the Student Community Relations office, and a new Examination Centre to support faculties and schools. University Registrar John Metcalfe notes the number of accommodated exams and midterms continues to rise each year.

“As we prepare for the move to the new centre, we are taking the opportunity to refresh our business processes, moving away from paper forms in favour of an online system,” says Dr. Metcalfe. “Between these changes, and the co-location of the Examination Centre with other wellness services, the process of securing an accommodation for an exam will be much less stressful for all involved. The intent is to create clarity on where to go, and offer a streamlined process for accommodations for both graduate and undergraduate students.”

The Examination Centre will include 70 private and semi-private rooms with adjustable desks; some will offer computers and specialized software. There will be no carpeting or fluorescent lighting, meaning students with light sensitivities or allergies can write without distraction, and some private rooms will be soundproofed for those who need to speak while writing.

The Queen’s University International Centre (QUIC) is also looking ahead to the move. The QUIC team, currently located in the John Deutsch University Centre, has a front row seat during the ongoing construction. While there have been some noise issues, Director Jyoti Kotecha (MPA'03) says it will all be worth it once the team is in the new space, which features a larger kitchen and adds some meeting rooms.

“Our new space and its proximity to other Student Affairs services will make it easier to work collaboratively with partners such as the Peer Health Educators and the Chaplaincy,” says Ms. Kotecha. “Though the space is comparable in size, it is better laid out and offers us some room to grow, in alignment with the growth of international enrolment at Queen’s.”

Another group making the big move next door will be the Office of the Interfaith Chaplaincy. Chaplain Kate Johnson says the new space includes a dedicated quiet room for prayer or meditation, a lounge area, and an additional office which will be shared by the office’s three part-time chaplains.

“This additional room will offer us more flexibility and, coupled with the new staff, should allow us to expand popular programs like our “Cooking with Grans” offering,” says Ms. Johnson. “Moving the Chaplaincy into the Innovation and Wellness Centre will also reunite us with more Student Wellness services, better serving students in the process.”

The Innovation and Wellness Centre’s grand opening is planned for fall 2018. 

Crews are working to have the construction site fully enclosed by the holiday break. (Photo by Bernard Clark)
Crews are working to have the construction site fully enclosed by the holiday break. (Photo by Bernard Clark)

 

Inside peek at the IWC

Principal Daniel Woolf leads tour of the Innovation and Wellness Centre for government officials.

  • Jim McLellan (Academic Director, DDQIC), Principal Daniel Woolf, Kevin Deluzio (Dean, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science), MPP Sophie Kiwala, MP Mark Gerretsen, Franco Lora (IWC project manager) John Witjes (Associate Vice-Principal Facilities), and Ann Tierney (Vice-Provost and Dean, Student Affairs) meet with workers from Ellis Don Construction (blue vests) during a tour of the Innovation and Wellness Centre.
    Jim McLellan (Academic Director, DDQIC), Principal Daniel Woolf, Kevin Deluzio (Dean, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science), MPP Sophie Kiwala, MP Mark Gerretsen, Franco Lora (IWC project manager) John Witjes (Associate Vice-Principal Facilities), and Ann Tierney (Vice-Provost and Dean, Student Affairs) meet with workers from Ellis Don Construction (blue vests) during a tour of the Innovation and Wellness Centre.
  • IWC Project Manager Franco Lora points out features in the main floor of the Innovation and Wellness Centre to MPP Sophie Kiwala.
    IWC Project Manager Franco Lora points out features in the main floor of the Innovation and Wellness Centre to MPP Sophie Kiwala.
  • When completed, the Innovation and Wellness Centre will feature new innovation and engineering laboratory spaces, as well as facilities for health and wellness services.
    When completed, the Innovation and Wellness Centre will feature new innovation and engineering laboratory spaces, as well as facilities for health and wellness services.
  • Associate Vice-Principal (Facilities) John Witjes shows MPP Sophie Kiwala and MP Mark Gerretsen renderings of what the main lobby of the Innovation and Wellness Centre will look like upon completion.
    Associate Vice-Principal (Facilities) John Witjes shows MPP Sophie Kiwala and MP Mark Gerretsen renderings of what the main lobby of the Innovation and Wellness Centre will look like upon completion.
  • A view from the second floor of the Innovation and Wellness Centre, facing towards the stone facade of the former Physical Education Centre.
    A view from the second floor of the Innovation and Wellness Centre, facing towards the stone facade of the former Physical Education Centre.
  • IWC Project Manager Franco Lora highlights recent progress to Principal Daniel Woolf and MPP Sophie Kiwala.
    IWC Project Manager Franco Lora highlights recent progress to Principal Daniel Woolf and MPP Sophie Kiwala.
  • Dean of the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Kevin Deluzio, talks with MP Mark Gerretsen during a tour of the Innovation and Wellness Centre.
    Dean of the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Kevin Deluzio, talks with MP Mark Gerretsen during a tour of the Innovation and Wellness Centre.
  • The tour group takes in the sights from the third floor of the Innovation and Wellness Centre.
    The tour group takes in the sights from the third floor of the Innovation and Wellness Centre.

Principal Daniel Woolf took Kingston and the Islands MP Mark Gerretsen and MPP Sophie Kiwala on a sneak preview tour of the Innovation and Wellness Centre on Friday, Nov. 17.

Joined by Kevin Deluzio, Dean of the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Ann Tierney, Vice-Provost and Dean of Student Affairs, Jim McLellan, Academic Director of the Dunin-Deshpande Queen's Innonvation Centre, John Witjes, Associate Vice-Principal, Facilities, and Franco Lora, IWC Project Manager, the tour group were able to witness first-hand the progress on the site and see the innovation spaces, engineering labs, and wellness centre taking shape.

Located on the site of the former Physical Education Centre, the Innovation and Wellness Centre will feature expanded engineering facilities, makerspaces, and experiential learning spaces, as well as an Innovation Hub – centered around the successful Queen’s Innovation Connector – and state-of-the-art interdisciplinary laboratories. These facilities will increase opportunities for research, student design and learning, while also strengthening the university’s position in world-leading research. The innovation and engineering facilities will be co-located with space for Student Wellness Services and the chaplaincy.

Queen’s engineer returns to graduate after 70 years

  • Bruce Jameson is hooded by Lynann Clapham, Associate Dean (Academic), Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science during Tuesday afternoon's Fall Convocation Ceremony.
    Bruce Jameson is hooded by Lynann Clapham, Associate Dean (Academic), Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science during Tuesday afternoon's Fall Convocation Ceremony.
  • Bruce Jameson is handed his diploma before going on stage during Tuesday afternoon's Fall Convocation ceremony at Grant Hall.
    Bruce Jameson is handed his diploma before going on stage during Tuesday afternoon's Fall Convocation ceremony at Grant Hall.
  • Bruce Jameson is congratulated by Chancellor Jim Leech after receiving his degree in engineering chemistry more than 70 years after he first arrived at Queen's.
    Bruce Jameson is congratulated by Chancellor Jim Leech after receiving his degree in engineering chemistry more than 70 years after he first arrived at Queen's.

Bruce Jameson earned a summer internship in the research department at Imperial Oil in Sarnia, Ontario in 1946. He was 22 years old then, with a sharp mind, a strong work ethic, and a fresh, state-of-the-art education in engineering chemistry from Queen’s.

All this was buoyed by the post-war optimism of the time. Anything seemed possible.

The job was an excellent opportunity for a young man to gain some on-the-job research experience at one of Canada’s largest petroleum companies. It worked out well. Jameson’s managers were pleased enough to offer him full-time work starting the following autumn, after he completed his final year at Queen’s. But more than that, it was that first summer in Sarnia when, at a regular bible study group, he met Annabelle. 

Life happened: marriage to his sweetheart, six children, 39 industrious and successful years at Imperial Oil, grandchildren, retirement, and great-grandchildren. It’s the kind of story anyone would be lucky to live but there was at least one loose end.

One of the course requirements for graduation with the class of Sc’47 was German II. No German II; no degree. Jameson doesn’t have German II.

“It was a different time and there was no pressure by my company to get the formal degree,” he says. “We were married immediately after I left school. We had a child the next year. We were busy with a family and building a house.”

Decades later, and long into retirement, Jameson’s story was relayed to his grandson David Currie.

“I work in the petrochemical industry and, though he didn’t seem to talk much about himself, he always seemed knowledgeable about the technical work I was doing,” Currie says. “It turned out that he held some Canadian patents and did some really important development work, so I started prying a little more.”

It just didn’t seem right to Currie that his grandfather, now 93, hadn’t earned his degree after such a long and accomplished career as an engineer. So, he decided to ask administrators at the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science at Queen’s if the university could grant Jameson his degree now, even without German II.

Currie reached out to his industry contacts to find records of his grandfather’s career. It was a tall order considering Jameson retired in 1986. The trail led eventually to Doug MacLaren, Applied Process Research Section Head at Imperial Oil. Though Jameson’s personnel records have long since been destroyed, MacLaren was able to piece together much of Jameson’s work history by sifting through department publications and technical reports.

“Mr. Jameson had a long, productive career as a chemist at Imperial Oil Research,” writes MacLaren after a long list of citations in a support letter to Queen’s. “As a chemist, he was able to participate in the development and implementation of several pivotal processes and techniques that transformed the petrochemical industry in the mid-20th century. Some of this work remains referenced today in the petroleum industry.”

It was enough to convince Dean Kevin Deluzio and Associate Dean (Academic) Lynann Clapham to waive the extra credit and grant Jameson his degree in engineering chemistry. On Tuesday, Nov. 14 Jameson, Currie and some of their extended family attended Fall Convocation at Queen’s so Jameson could receive his degree in person.

“It would never have come about if I had to do it,” says Jameson. “David did it all. I enjoyed my time at Queen’s immensely. Even though I didn’t get the degree, my time at Queen’s prepared me for my working life. I had 39 years in industry and 31 years of retirement, so I’m doing all right.”

Remembering the 5th Field Company

  • Royal Military College Officer Cadets Malcolm Madower and Andrew Haves, future combat engineers, were among the current military representatives at the Remembrance Day unveiling. (University Communications)
    Royal Military College Officer Cadets Madower and Haves, future combat engineers, were among the current military representatives at the Remembrance Day unveiling. (University Communications)
  • Brigadier-General Steve Irwin (Ret’d), Colonel Commandant of the Canadian Military Engineers, delivers remarks on behalf of the military. The support of the military was key to the construction of this plinth. (University Communications)
    Brigadier-General Steve Irwin (Ret’d), Colonel Commandant of the Canadian Military Engineers, delivers remarks on behalf of the military. The support of the military was key to the construction of this plinth. (University Communications)
  • Kevin Deluzio, Dean of the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, and Brigadier-General Steve Irwin (Ret’d), Colonel Commandant of the Canadian Military Engineers, unveil the monument, which includes a six-page booklet about the 5th Field Company. (University Communications)
    Kevin Deluzio, Dean of the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, and Brigadier-General Steve Irwin (Ret’d), Colonel Commandant of the Canadian Military Engineers, unveil the monument, which includes a six-page booklet about the 5th Field Company. (University Communications)
  • Kevin Deluzio, Dean of the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, lays a wreath at the unveiling of the 5th Field Company plinth. (University Communications)
    Kevin Deluzio, Dean of the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, lays a wreath at the unveiling of the 5th Field Company plinth. (University Communications)
  • Corporal Stanley Clark Fields, a veteran of the Second World War and member of the 5th Field Company, was present for the unveiling, along with three generations of his family. (University Communications)
    Corporal Stanley Clark Fields, a veteran of the Second World War and member of the 5th Field Company, was present for the unveiling, along with three generations of his family. (University Communications)
  • An officer cadet lays a wreath at the First World War Roll of Honour in the Memorial Room, located in the John Deutsch University Centre. (University Communications)
    An officer cadet lays a wreath at the First World War Roll of Honour in the Memorial Room, located in the John Deutsch University Centre. (University Communications)

On Remembrance Day, veterans, serving military personnel, and members of the Queen's community led by Dean of Engineering and Applied Science Kevin Deluzio gathered to honour the victims of conflicts, past and present, and to pay special tribute to a group of Queen's students and faculty who answered the call during both World Wars.

A new monument unveiled on campus on Saturday was dedicated to the men of the 5th Field Company, Royal Canadian Engineers. The group, which comprised Queen’s students and faculty from the school of Mining Engineering, was formed just prior to the First World War, making them the first 'purely university company in Canada'. This unit of engineers was granted official recognition in early 1910. They contributed greatly to Canada’s preparations for the Great War, and men of the company served bravely in both World Wars. Many made the ultimate sacrifice.

Among those joining Queen's for the unveiling of the plinth was Brigadier-General Steve Irwin (Ret’d), Colonel Commandant of the Canadian Military Engineers; Major-General Sylvain Sirois, the Chief Military Engineer; Colonel Andrew Bassinger, Director of the Royal Canadian Engineers; Principal Kowal of the Royal Military College of Canada; and a number of representatives from the Canadian Armed Forces and Royal Military College. In addition, the university paid tribute to Corporal Stanley Clark Fields, a member of the 5th Field Company during the Second World War. Corporal Fields and his family were in attendance at the unveiling, and Corporal Fields was awarded a Canadian Military Engineer Branch Commendation for his tireless work capturing the history of the 5th Field Company.

"It is my hope that this plinth will remind, inform, and spark interest to learn more," says Dean Deluzio. "Standing as it is, in a central location on campus, this plinth will be passed daily by many hundreds of individuals; students, faculty, staff, and visitors. In future, we will incorporate the 5th Field Company into our annual University Remembrance and, as they do today, the flags will be flown at half-mast for the 5th and other members of Queen’s who gave so much in the service of their country, and in the name of freedom."

The monument is located at the intersection of Union Street and Fifth Field Company Lane. This is the second plinth to be unveiled as part of the Queen’s Remembers initiative. Through this initiative, Queen’s is reflecting upon its history in a project to commemorate those who have made a significant and noteworthy contribution to the university. The planning for the Queen’s Remembers initiative was led by Principal Woolf in collaboration with the facilities and university planning teams, University Relations, and those with specific ties to the topics being commemorated. 

The intent of this particular plinth is to remember the sacrifices of the men of the 5th Field Company, many of whom were the same ages as our students, and who unequivocally put others before themselves. Many people contributed to the realization of this memorial, and Dean Deluzio thanked the many supporters including 1 Engineer Support Unit and the Government of Canada.

To learn more about the 5th Field Company, and others from Queen’s who gave their lives in the two World Wars, please visit the Queen's Archives website.

A new street sign was also unveiled on Fifth Field Company Lane. (University Communications)

 

Five Queen's professors renewed as Canada Research Chairs

Canada Research Chairs program advances the nation’s position as a leader in discovery and innovation.

One of the country’s highest research honours, the Canada Research Chairs program advances the nation’s position as a leader in discovery and innovation and, recently, five Queen’s faculty members were renewed at both Tier 1 and Tier 2 levels. Tier 1 Chairs are recognized by their peers as world leaders in their respective fields, while Tier 2 Chairs are recognized as emerging leaders in their research areas. Queen’s is home to over 40 Canada Research Chairs.

“The Canada Research Chairs Program continues to enlist and retain our country’s best and brightest researchers,” says John Fisher, Interim Vice-Principal (Research). “Here at Queen’s we are very proud to have five of our most accomplished researchers renewed as chairs, as it speaks to our institution’s pursuit of excellence and leadership across a variety of disciplines.”

Developed in 2000, each year the CRC program invests up to $300 million to attract and retain some of the world's most accomplished and promising minds. Queen’s will receive $200,000 per year over seven years for each Tier 1 Chair and $100,000 per year over five years for each Tier 2 Chair.

Queen’s renewed CRCs are:

Pascale Champagne (Civil Engineering) has been renewed as a Tier 2 Canada Research Chair in Bioresource Engineering. A number of Canadian policies have increased incentives for renewable energy generation, bioproduct recovery, and environmentally sustainable approaches to manage water, waste and renewable resources. Dr. Champagne’s research aims to enhance our fundamental understanding of how to lessen environmental impacts of technologies associated with this effort, as well as to use ‘green chemistry’ to establish a future supply of sustainable bio-based energy, fuel material and chemical products.

Will Kymlicka (Philosophy) has been renewed as a Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in Political Philosophy. Citizenship is often described as tracking social membership but, according to Dr. Kymlicka, many members of society are denied full citizenship based on their linguistic or cognitive capacities. His research will explore new concepts of inclusive citizenship that seek to enable the voices and participation of all members.

Warren Mabee (Geography and Planning) has been renewed as a Tier 2 Canada Research Chair in Renewable Energy Development and Implementation. Dr. Mabee evaluates new renewable energy technologies in terms of their economic, social, and environmental performance, and seeks to create tools to link national and regional energy modeling with local initiatives. Ultimately, his research supports increased renewable energy use across Canada.

Morten Nielsen (Economics) has been renewed as a Tier 2 Canada Research Chair in Time Series Econometrics. Dr. Nielsen’s research develops new and improved statistical methods for analyzing time-series data. Such methods are widely used in applied macro-economics, financial economics,
and many other fields.

R. Kerry Rowe (Civil Engineering) has been renewed as a Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering. The prevention of groundwater contamination at landfill and mining sites is a critical environmental issue. Dr. Rowe’s research will combine modeling and experimental data to investigate long-term performance of various landfill liner systems, and provide new guidelines for the design of anti-contamination systems for future landfills and mining operations.

For more information on Queen’s CRC holders and the program, visit the website.

Grant Hall becoming a Venetian lagoon

You walk through a towering archway to find San Marco Square laid out before you. A grand, two-story façade demands attention across the dance floor, while gondolas wait in side-winding canals to either side.

The two-story San Marco Square main structure takes shape in Grant Hall. (University Communications)
The two-story San Marco Square main structure takes shape in Grant Hall. (University Communications)

Italy? Think again. The 2018 Science Formal will bring Venice to Queen’s, and you’re invited to a sneak peek in support of the United Way.

The Queen’s fourth year engineering students will host an Open House on Saturday, Nov. 4 from 12 p.m. to 3 p.m. in Grant Hall. The lecture hall will be open to the public for walk-throughs, by donation to the United Way. This is a great opportunity to take pictures and take in the results of three months of hard work.

Claire Phillips (Sci’18), Arts Chair for the project, says the Science Formal is a great way for engineering students to show both the scientific and artistic sides of engineering.

“We have a lot of people that are really creative and artistic,” Ms. Phillips says. “The theme this year is a Venetian masquerade. All of the rooms are based on the concept of guests travelling through the different aspects of Venice.”

An engineering student works on the lettering of sign for the 2018 Science Formal, “Welcome to Laguna di Venezia”. (University Communications)
An engineering student works on the lettering of sign for the 2018 Science Formal, “Welcome to Laguna di Venezia”. (University Communications)

The project covers five lecture rooms in Grant Hall and Kingston Hall. These venues will include the iconic San Marco Square, a glassblowing room, villa garden, canal hallways, and a masquerade ballroom.

“Every engineering student volunteer their time over the course of three months for this event,” says Matthew Clark (Sci’18), Convener and lead of the project. “I got involved as the Convener because I wanted to be part of something unique to the country and university. I can’t think of any other university program that lets engineering students build a two-story structure inside a marquee building on campus.”

You can find out more about the Open House and the Science Formal on the Science Formal website.

Members of the Science Formal Committee pose for a photo in front of the work in progress centerpiece of the 2018 Science Formal in Grant Hall. From left to right: Rob Purcell, Construction Chair; Claire Philips, Art Chair; Matthew Clark, Convener; and Kristen Wadey, Communications Chair. (University Communications)
Members of the Science Formal Committee pose for a photo in front of the work in progress centerpiece of the 2018 Science Formal in Grant Hall. From left to right: Rob Purcell, Construction Chair; Claire Philips, Art Chair; Matthew Clark, Convener; and Kristen Wadey, Communications Chair. (University Communications)

Second Queen’s Remembers plinth to be dedicated to 5th Field Company

Plinth to be unveiled at a special ceremony on Saturday, November 11 at 2 p.m.

The 5th Field Company. (Supplied Photo)
The 5th Field Company. (Supplied Photo)

With the threat of war in Europe, Canada began to form volunteer units for military training. Queen’s University was the first Canadian university to form an officially recognized military unit, in 1909, comprising engineering students and faculty; the 5th Field Company. In August 1914, the government called upon the 5th Field Company when it needed space to train and prepare its soldiers. The men were sent to Valcartier, Québec. Their mission: turn acres of land into a highly organized camp for up to 30,000 men, with roads, a water supply system, and space for tents. Once the work was complete, the group was divided up – some headed across the sea to fight, while others supported the war effort from Canada.

The unit was ‘the only purely University Company in Canada’, and was led by Professor and Major Alexander Macphail. Under his leadership the students and faculty were trained in the years prior to the outbreak of war, making them well prepared to respond when Canada entered the fight.

In recognition of the contributions of the 5th Field Company, a commemorative plinth will be unveiled on Saturday, November 11 at a special ceremony beginning at 2 pm. Joining Queen’s for this ceremony will be local veterans and military members, including representatives from the Royal Military College of Canada.

“On Remembrance Day, we reflect on the service and sacrifices of Canadian men and women, during both wartime and peacekeeping missions,” says Daniel Woolf, Principal and Vice-Chancellor. “This year, we pay special tribute to a group of Queen’s alumni and professors – the 5th Field Company – while also acknowledging the many others in our community who have served, and continue to serve, our country. This plinth will serve as an important and lasting reminder of their legacy.”

The plinth will feature an eight-page booklet containing information about the company, how it was formed, and their training. It will speak of the wartime contributions of the company, as well as the history of the company between the World Wars. Mention will be made of the Memorial Room in the John Deutsch University Centre in which the names of the fallen are listed.

The monument will be located at the intersection of Union Street and Fifth Field Company Lane, which runs through campus past a number of buildings including Nicol Hall, Miller Hall, and the Fifth Field Company Campus Bookstore, also named for the company. This is the second plinth to be unveiled as part of the Queen’s Remembers initiative. Through this initiative, Queen’s is reflecting upon its history in a project to commemorate those who have made a significant and noteworthy contribution to the university. The planning for the Queen’s Remembers initiative was led by Principal Woolf in collaboration with the facilities and university planning teams, University Relations, and those with specific ties to the topics being commemorated.

The first Queen’s Remembers plinth was unveiled in October and dedicated to the Anishinaabe and the Haudenosaunee peoples as the traditional inhabitants of the land. Future plinths will be announced later this academic year.

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