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Research Data Management survey continues

Queen’s University Library is launching a third round of the Research Data Management (RDM) Survey to solicit feedback from the Faculty of Health Sciences community.

On Monday Jan. 16, faculty members, postdoctoral fellows and graduate students in the Faculty of Health Sciences will be asked about RDM practices of sharing and managing research data and to how the library might help facilitate data management activities on campus. 

This initiative is part of Portage’s Canadian RDM Survey Consortium, a group of several universities working together to gain a richer understanding of RDM practices and required support services, particularly in light of upcoming changes to funding requirements around data sharing, data preservation and the submission of data management plans. 

Last fall Queen’s University Library conducted the initial survey looking for insights from the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, as well as several departments in the Faculty of Arts and Science including Departments of Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Geography and Planning, Geological Sciences and Geological Engineering, Mathematics and Statistics, Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, and the School of Environmental Studies. This data, report, and documentation are now available for download from Scholars Portal Dataverse.

“Our findings provide valuable insights into the volumes of information researchers are dealing with, and into RDM services that the Queen’s research community is interested in,” says Tatiana Zaraiskaya, Public Service e-Science Librarian. “One of the most interesting findings of this survey was the extent to which respondents expressed interest in training and support for data management. Best practices and standards are key, and on the data front, library data services are well-positioned to provide and promote these to researchers. ”

This past summer, a revised version of the RDM survey was administered in the Faculty of Arts and Science (Humanities and Social Sciences), Smith School of Business, Faculty of Law, Faculty of Education, and the School of Policy Studies. Data analysis and report writing are now underway.

Queen's University Library provides RDM services to support researchers in meeting grant requirements, producing more competitive grant applications, and increasing the impact and visibility of researchers’ work. RDM services encourages long-term preservation of data and ensures compliance with ethics and privacy policies. The library encourages researchers to get in touch with an RDM specialist using the form on their website.

The library will continue to share survey updates. Anyone with questions is asked to contact the Research Data Management Survey Team.

A mission to bolster the strength of Africa’s young people

As part of the unveiling of a new partnership between Queen’s University and the University of Gondar in Ethiopia – supported by a 10-year, USD$24-million grant from The MasterCard Foundation – the Queen’s Gazette is providing an inside look at both the University of Gondar and The MasterCard Foundation, as well as how this project was developed. In this piece, we look at the history and mission of the foundation, and its role in bringing this project together.

Visit The MasterCard Foundation website and you’ll find an abundance of stories – stories that detail the impact of the organization’s mission to give African youth with few resources the chance to succeed.

In particular, the foundation’s Scholars Program – which Queen’s has joined through its partnership with the University of Gondar in Ethiopia – aims to provide economically challenged but academically talented young people living in Sub-Saharan Africa with quality secondary and university education.

Students enrolled in The MasterCard Foundation Scholars program come from various parts of Africa and study at institutions around the world. In the above photo, Scholars studying in North America gather at a bootcamp in New York City last fall. (Jake Naughton for The MasterCard Foundation)

The stories of the Scholars describe their commitment to the future of Africa – through problem-solving on issues such as food security, politics and governance, human rights, women’s rights, and mental health awareness.

“They are truly Africa’s next-generation leaders,” says Anna Miller, Program Manager for Education and Learning at The MasterCard Foundation. “For MasterCard Foundation Scholars, this is not only an opportunity to receive a quality education, but an opportunity to be a part of a movement of young leaders who will create inclusive change that matters within their communities. They are not only selected on the basis of their academic prowess, but also on the basis of their character, and the promise they have shown as next-generation leaders who give back to their communities.”

The MasterCard Foundation Scholars – the program has reached almost 35,000 students so far – study near their homes and around the world, at partner institutions such as Duke University, the American University of Beirut, Makerere University in Uganda, University of Cape Town, and the University of Edinburgh, as well as with Canadian partners – Queen’s, University of Toronto, McGill University, and the University of British Columbia. Receiving holistic financial, academic, and emotional support, the students get to pursue their academic dreams across any discipline and use what they’ve learned to give back to their communities and become role models and mentors to others.

The MasterCard Foundation’s beginning and its future

The MasterCard Foundation was created through a generous gift from Mastercard World Wide at the time of its Initial Public Offering (IPO) in 2006, endowed by the company with 10 per cent of the its shares. At the time of the IPO, the endowment was worth $500 million – today, its value has grown to more than $10 billion, ranking the foundation as among the largest in the world.

Completely independent from Mastercard, the foundation charts its own course and has long placed priority on Africa. Its goal is to assist people living in poverty by providing access to education, financial inclusion, and skills training. 

More stories in the Gazette on the partnership
Project overview: The MasterCard Foundation $24M grant launches 10-year, int'l project
An interview with the University of Gondar: Queen's-Gondar project an opportunity to push programming further
A Scholar's perspective: Scholar Munya Mahiya shares vision for inclusive universities

Africa has the world’s youngest population (600 million under the age of 25) and in some areas, 60 per cent of youth live below the poverty line. The foundation believes that with the right opportunities, young people can lift themselves, their families, and communities out of poverty.

"The MasterCard Foundation’s vision is for a world where all have the opportunity to learn and prosper,” explains Peter Materu, Director of Education and Learning, The MasterCard Foundation. “Core to this mission is the conviction that a person’s starting point in life should not determine his or her future. Rather, the foundation believes in the agency of individuals to change their own lives and the lives of others. We believe that this change happens only when people are equipped with the right knowledge, skills, and tools. This is what we are seeking to achieve under the Scholars Program and the Gondar/Queen’s partnership in particular."

'Queen’s is lucky to work with the University of Gondar'

Students in The MasterCard Foundation Scholars Program are committed to giving back to their communities, becoming role models and mentors to others. In the above photo, students meet at a summit in Ghana last year. (Illume for The MasterCard Foundation)

Part of the Scholars Program, the Queen’s-University of Gondar 10-year project provides access to secondary and higher education for young people, many of them with disabilities or from conflict-affected regions, who are committed to giving back to their communities.

“The MasterCard Foundation was the matchmaker in this project, as they connected our team at the International Centre for the Advancement of Community Based Rehabilitation (ICACBR) with our counterparts at the University of Gondar,” says Heather Aldersey, Queen’s National Scholar and Assistant Professor in the School of Rehabilitation Therapy and the faculty project lead at Queen’s University.

Dr. Aldersey says it just happened that her team and a team at the University of Gondar submitted similar proposals to The MasterCard Foundation around the same time. While they didn’t have all the same elements, the foundation could see the “shared interest” and asked both universities to come up with some more ideas.

“It’s wonderful to be able to partner with the University of Gondar,” says Dr. Aldersey. “They are so visionary. They know what they want in Ethiopia, they know what they want in Gondar, and I think Queen’s is lucky to be able to work with them. They have included us to help in their vision for change and I think it’s a great opportunity for all involved.”

[Mastercard Foundation logo]
Learn more about The MasterCard Foundation’s ongoing projects...

 

Queen’s-Gondar project an opportunity to push programming further

As part of the unveiling of a new partnership between Queen’s University and the University of Gondar in Ethiopia – supported by a 10-year, USD$24-million grant from The MasterCard Foundation – the Queen’s Gazette and Queen’s Gazette Today are providing an inside look at both the University of Gondar and The MasterCard Foundation, as well as how the project was developed.

The following is a Q & A (edited for length) with the University of Gondar and the project leads at UoG, Ansha Nega, Assistant Professor of Public Health, and Yifokire Tefera, Assistant Professor of Public Health.

The University of Gondar, located in northern Ethiopia, was established in 1954, first as the Public Health Training Institute and was later known as the Gondar College of Medical Sciences. It is the oldest medical school in Ethiopia and is built around the philosophy of team approach and community based teaching of health professionals. (Photo courtesy of the University of Gondar)

University of Gondar is already well-established in the field of community based rehabilitation. Could you describe your program and how it works?

[Ansha Nega]
Ansha Nega, Assistant Professor of Public Health, is one of the project leads at the University of Gondar. (Photo courtesy of the University of Gondar)

University of Gondar’s Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR) program is the only community based rehabilitation program in Gondar, and was established in 2005 in partnership with Light for the World and Save the Children International. The CBR program was introduced after the Bachelor of Science degree in physiotherapy education launched in 2002. The overall aim of the CBR program at the UoG is to improve the quality of life for adults and children with disabilities with no appropriate care in North Gondar Administrative zone, Amhara Regional State, Ethiopia.

The CBR program, with its community field workers, delivers home-to-home disability rehabilitation services for children and youth. The program enables better medical and rehabilitation referral service, from remote rural set-up to the University of Gondar Hospital and other major public hospitals in Ethiopia. Moreover, the CBR program offers support to access assistive devices in order to maximize the role and participation in the community through disability mainstreaming and to access micro credit enterprises in 42 kebeles [wards or neighbourhoods], which are found in 11 districts of North Gondar Administrative zone.

UoG’s CBR program strives to promote inclusive education and contribute to the development of an inclusive education system in Amhara region by strengthening local schools and building the capacity of CBR workers. Some of the program’s strategies include encouraging school enrolment of children with disabilities, capacity-building for local school teachers, education material support, and accessibility improvement in the school environment. This will help to provide and promote the accessibility of equitable, quality, and sustainable inclusive education.

How will the support of The MasterCard Foundation Scholars program help the University of Gondar build on this existing strength and benefit the field in Ethiopia and East Africa?

[Yifokire Tefera]
Yifokire Tefera, Assistant Professor of Public Health, will also lead the project at the University of Gondar. (Photo courtesy of the University of Gondar)

The MasterCard Foundation-Queen’s partnership will be useful to build UoG’s institutional capacity to offer cross-cutting content and programs in disability and rehabilitation science for Ethiopia and neighbouring countries in East Africa. In addition to creating a new program, we will strengthen existing content to align with evidence-based practice, including multidisciplinary collaboration within the health and psycho-social sciences. There are different departments at UoG that currently offer various health- and rehabilitation-related qualifications; however, these departments often work in silos and this is not consistent with international best practice. There is a need to pursue integrated, multidisciplinary collaboration between departments to facilitate the delivery of holistic, multi-sector disability and rehabilitation services. Similarly, there has been a growing interest in strengthening research capacity and mentoring in UoG to increase the involvement of students in research activities, to create and manage research training programs and infrastructures.

UoG’s CBR program embarked on a vision to be a centre of excellence for evidence-based practical rehabilitation education and a service centre in East Africa. At the moment, the existing CBR program service is limited to the northwest part of Ethiopia and we would like to see greater integration of professionals across the health, education, social, and livelihoods sectors in our work. The prospect for higher education for persons with disabilities or other disadvantaged segments of the population is highly restricted, due to the fact that access to education and job opportunities is not yet well established. To realize this vision, work in partnership with various organizations, strategic objective-setting, developing higher-level educated rehabilitation scientists and workers, and developing the capacity of the current CBR program to a higher, world-class level, and expanding its geographic reach in the country, as well as in East Africa, is necessary.

This project aims to improve educational opportunities for disadvantaged youth in East Africa – could you describe how this project will potentially impact the region?

The vision of this project is to make the University of Gondar a centre of excellence in the region for recruiting, accommodating, and supporting the success of youth with disabilities in tertiary education. These youth will play a pivotal role in economic growth and social transformation of the region.

More stories in the Gazette on the partnership
Project overview: The MasterCard Foundation $24M grant launches 10-year, int'l project
On The MasterCard Foundation: A mission to bolster the strength of Africa's young people
A Scholar's perspective: Scholar Munya Mahiya shares vision for inclusive universities

The MasterCard Foundation-Queen’s program will enable practical attachments for students during their study and will promote and provide opportunities for hands-on learning with multidisciplinary teams. The CBR program will support a give-back approach for Scholars, emphasizing the importance of volunteerism for high-impact change and role modelling for other youth with disabilities. Given the geopolitical setting of Ethiopia in the region (highly populous country, relatively stable and peaceful country, and home of the African Union, making it well-situated for inter-African collaboration), the project has an additional advantage of recruitment of international students and opportunity to influence regional change.

What made you decide to undertake this partnership with Queen’s University?

Recognizing the importance of building institutional capacity to improve educational quality and Scholars’ experiential learning experience, the University of Gondar decided to partner with Queen’s University. Queen’s experience and the level of development in community based rehabilitation service is substantial. Queen’s long years of immense practical learnings could be a fertile ground for universities like ours to learn from, especially in rehabilitation sciences. It is a very good opportunity that both universities have CBR programs; however, University of Gondar’s program has only been running for a decade and has room for further development.

What are you looking forward to in working with Queen’s during this 10-year project? And what kind of impact do you think the project will have on the University of Gondar and its international partnerships in the long term?

The partnership between Queen’s University and UoG will have an ultimate outcome of improved access to high-quality education and meaningful employment opportunities for disadvantaged youth in Ethiopia, particularly youth with disabilities. These outcomes will be achieved through an integrated set of activities during the project implementation period and commitment of the UoG to ensure the continuation of impacts and changes brought by the partnership.

We expect that Queen’s and UoG faculty and staff will collaborate on eight research projects. The knowledge gained through these exchanges and research projects will enrich course content, global understanding, and will advance Ethiopian and regional understanding of and priority for inclusive higher education. The increased knowledge from these interactions could impact national policy and programs, which could have great benefit for the estimated 17.6 million people with disabilities living in Ethiopia. Our vision for the dissemination of the research on inclusive education is that it will also have a transformative impact on educational approaches, university policy, and program implementation during the upcoming 10 years of the project and beyond. We also expect that newly trained Ethiopian OTs may help to develop programs or serve in neighbouring countries in the years following their training, causing a ripple effect for the development of the OT profession in East Africa. The impact of this project stands to be incredibly far-reaching.

The MasterCard Foundation $24M grant launches 10-year, int'l project

Through the foundation’s Scholars Program, Queen’s begins partnership with the University of Gondar to advance inclusive education for young people with disabilities in Ethiopia and Africa.

Students enrolled in The MasterCard Foundation Scholars Program study all over the world. Here, Scholars attend a bootcamp in New York City for those studying in North America. (Jake Naughton for The MasterCard Foundation)

Thanks to a generous 10-year, USD$24.2-million grant from The MasterCard Foundation, Queen’s University has begun a partnership with the University of Gondar to advance inclusive education for young people with disabilities in Ethiopia and other countries in Africa.

[Mastercard Scholars Foundation logo]

Learn more about The MasterCard Foundation Scholars Program

Part of the foundation’s Scholars Program, the partnership will provide 450 next-generation African leaders with a high-quality education at the University of Gondar, while also providing 60 of the university’s faculty members with the opportunity to study at Queen’s, where they will enhance their skills in innovative pedagogy and in leading collaborative research between African and North American universities. The University of Gondar and Queen’s University will also collaborate to develop Ethiopia’s first occupational therapy program.

“We are delighted to work on this tremendous, multi-faceted project with the University of Gondar and The MasterCard Foundation,” says Daniel Woolf, Queen’s Principal and Vice-Chancellor. “Without a doubt, this collaboration will change lives and create new pathways for education in Africa. It will also provide Queen’s researchers and students new avenues for growth, as they join with University of Gondar faculty members on research projects and support Gondar faculty through training programs and the development of the first undergraduate occupational therapy program in Ethiopia.”

As part of the partnership, the University of Gondar will provide 290 undergraduate and 160 master’s level degrees in multidisciplinary fields that will encompass health sciences, law, education, nursing, and rehabilitation sciences, taking special care to recruit young people with disabilities, as well as young people from conflict-affected countries. The University of Gondar will deliver an annual Summer Leadership Camp for Scholars across the program, as well as a robust, practicum-based experiential program focused on giving back to community, through service and leadership skill development in the field of community-based rehabilitation.

"Through their collaboration, these exceptional institutions will not only forge a new path for inclusive education in Africa, but will also bring much-needed perspectives that will enable us to better understand the needs of talented young people living with disabilities." 
~ Peter Materu, Director, Education and Learning and Youth Livelihoods, The MasterCard Foundation

“We are excited to welcome the University of Gondar and Queen’s University to the Scholars Program,” says Peter Materu, Director, Education and Learning and Youth Livelihoods, The MasterCard Foundation. “Through their collaboration, these exceptional institutions will not only forge a new path for inclusive education in Africa, but will also bring much-needed perspectives that will enable us to better understand the needs of talented young people living with disabilities. This partnership represents a new innovation in the Scholars Program that demonstrates how one can leverage the capacity of one partner to establish and strengthen programs in priority areas of need in another institution.”

More stories in the Gazette on the partnership
An interview with the University of Gondar: Queen's-Gondar project an opportunity to push programming further
On The MasterCard Foundation: A mission to bolster the strength of Africa's young people
A Scholar's perspective: Scholar Munya Mahiya shares vision for inclusive universities

A leader in community-based rehabilitation and home to the International Centre for the Advancement of Community Based Rehabilitation (ICACBR), Queen’s University will provide 44 University of Gondar faculty members with PhD training to develop skills and capabilities needed to supervise Scholars’ research and practicums. Queen’s University will also support the University of Gondar as it develops and implements the first undergraduate occupational therapy curriculum and program in Ethiopia. This work will involve providing master’s level training in occupational therapy to 16 University of Gondar faculty members, who will then work with Queen’s occupational therapy faculty members to develop a curriculum and teach in the first occupational therapy program at the University of Gondar.

“The University of Gondar embraces this partnership with great enthusiasm, for it comes with an opportunity to boost its vision of becoming a Centre of Excellence in rehabilitation and inclusive education, research, and community engagement,” says Desalegn Mengesha, University of Gondar President. “This partnership will develop the capacity of both universities to plan and effectively undertake large-scale, people-centred interventions with multi-faceted benefits to the institutions and their respective stakeholders.”

[Heather Aldersey]
Heather Aldersey, Assistant Professor in the School of Rehabilitation Therapy, is the faculty project lead at Queen’s University. (Photo by Bernard Clark)

A global network of scholars

The University of Gondar and Queen’s University join a global network of 27 Scholars Programs committed to ensuring that all young people, no matter their starting point in life, should have an equal chance to obtain a quality education and pursue their aspirations.

The program provides education and leadership development for nearly 35,000 bright, young leaders with a deep personal commitment to changing the world around them. These young people will create change that matters within their communities and will usher in a new era of inclusive prosperity in Africa and beyond.

“This partnership brings about mutual and substantial benefits to both Queen’s and the University of Gondar,” says Heather Aldersey, Assistant Professor in the School of Rehabilitation Therapy and the faculty project lead at Queen’s University. “We are delighted to have the opportunity to partner with visionary leaders in disability and inclusive development at the University of Gondar on this project. I have no doubt that the impact of this work will create sustained improvement of opportunities for young people with disabilities in Ethiopia.”


About Community Based Rehabilitation

Community based rehabilitation (CBR) was first initiated by the World Health Organization in 1978 in an effort to enhance the quality of life for people with disabilities and their families.

While initially a strategy to increase access to rehabilitation services in resource-constrained settings, CBR has grown to include measures such as equalization of opportunities and social inclusion of people with disabilities in an effort to combat the cycle of poverty and disability.

CBR is implemented through the combined efforts of people with disabilities, their families and communities, and relevant government and non-government health, education, vocational, social, and other services.

CBR at Queen’s

For more than 25 years, the International Centre for the Advancement of Community Based Rehabilitation (ICACBR), headquartered in the School of Rehabilitation Therapy at Queen’s University, has worked to expand community based rehabilitation practices in communities around the world.

More than 200 researchers and practitioners have been involved in ICACBR-affiliated projects.

Currently, the centre manages three major projects :

  • the Access to Health & Education for all Disabled Children & Youth (AHEAD) project in Bangladesh
  • the Queen Elizabeth II Scholarships for Excellence in International Community Based Rehabilitation, and
  • a participatory project on stigma and intellectual disability in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Representing Canada on the world stage

Queen’s cardiologist Chris Simpson named Canadian Medical Association representative to World Medical Association.

[International logo]
Queen's in the World

When Queen’s cardiologist Chris Simpson’s term as past president of the Canadian Medical Association (CMA) came to an end earlier this year, he looked for new opportunities to continue playing a leadership role in guiding the medical profession in Canada. Beginning in 2017, he will have the opportunity to do so as the CMA’s representative to the World Medical Association – an international confederation of 112 national medical associations, representing 10 million physicians around the globe.

“I was pretty delighted to be elected by the CMA Board to serve in this new role,” says Dr. Simpson. “In my previous role (as CMA President) the issues were predominantly Canadian and nationally-based, but Canada has a lot to offer the world in terms of our science, our excellence in medical education and training, and our work on professionalism. In a number of the issues we’ve been grappling with – from medical aid in dying to medical marijuana - Canada has been very progressive. It’s an opportunity to share that with the world and one I’m looking forward to.”

[Chris Simpson]
Dr. Simpson has been elected to a four-year term as the Canadian Medical Association's representative to the World Medical Organization - an partnership of 112 national medical associations which aims to promote international excellence in medical education, ethics, and health care. (Supplied photo)

As the CMA Representative, Dr. Simpson will represent the voice of Canada’s physicians in tackling many of the pressing medical issues facing the global community. He explains that he is most looking forward to getting involved in issues around refugee health and supporting physicians working in war zones. The association is also heavily invested in the social determinants of health - including poverty reduction, access to clean drinking water, food security and early childhood education.

“The association presents a unique opportunity for all of organized medicine – at least in those 112 countries – to come together to see how they can be better than the sum of their parts” Dr. Simpson explains. “There’s a real sense of responsibility for the more technologically and economically developed nations – such as Canada, the UK, Germany, Japan, the US and others – to share their expertise with countries that don’t have that sort of infrastructure and help develop medical education to a higher standard around the globe.”

Dr. Simpson will serve the first two years of his term in an observer role alongside current representative Louis Francescutti (University of Alberta). This transitory period, similar to the dual roles of president and past president in the CMA, allow for the incoming member to get acquainted with the role while maintaining continuity. From 2019-2021, he will fully take over the representative role at WMA meetings around the globe.

“Dr. Simpson is a highly respected and skilled physician who has shown tremendous leadership as a voice for the medical profession in Canada,” says Richard Reznick, Dean of Health Sciences and Director of the School of Medicine. “I wish him my most sincere congratulations on this appointment and trust that he will serve as a strong advocate for Canadian physicians to the global medical community.”

Founded in Paris on Sept. 17, 1947, the World Medical Association was created to ensure the independence of physicians. Its mission is to serve humanity by endeavoring to achieve the highest international standards in medical education, medical science, medical art and medical ethics, and health care for all people in the world.

For more information on the WMA, please visit the website.

Leading by example

Sam McKegney (English Language and Literature) and Louise Winn (Biomedical and Molecular Sciences) have been recognized by the School of Graduate Studies (SGS) for their work with graduate students.

Awarded for the first time last year, the “Featured Graduate Coordinators of the Year” initiative is aimed at highlighting the best practices among graduate coordinators.  

“Graduate Coordinators are on the front lines of providing crucial supports to students and supervisors. The School of Graduate Studies launched the Graduate Coordinators of the Year initiative in 2015 to feature excellent initiatives that could inspire colleagues across the disciplines,” says Kim McAuley, Associate Dean, SGS. “Louise Winn and Sam McKegney have set great examples by developing new programs and promoting a supportive community for graduate students and their faculty supervisors.”

Sam McKegney

[Sam McKegney]
Sam McKegney

Specializing in the study of Indigenous and Canadian literatures, Dr. McKegney says he feels very fortunate to oversee graduate studies at Queen’s in the traditional territories of the Haudenosaunee and Anishinaabe peoples. He points out that while he is involved in a number of graduate-related initiatives, the acting head of the Department of English Language and Literature regularly utilizes a collaborative approach.

He is currently involved in the development of the MPhil degree in English Literature – a two-year Master’s Level degree with direct entry into the doctoral program. He is also overseeing two experiential learning components for graduate programs. The first – the Literary Internship –provides master’s students with work experience that is directly related to literary studies, including Kingston WritersFest, the Strathy Language Unit, and McGill-Queen’s University Press.  The second – the Publishing Practicum –takes students through the revision and submission stages of scholarly publishing with the goal of achieving a publishable piece by the end of the student’s first year of doctoral study.

In receiving the award, Dr. McKegney provides the following advice for incoming graduate coordinators:

“Be personally invested in the wellbeing and successes of your grad students, but do not take their struggles personally. Try to focus on developing solutions to concerns that arise without bearing the burden of responsibility for things beyond your control.

Louise Winn

[Louise Winn]
Louise Winn

As the Associate Head - Graduate Studies for the Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, Dr. Winn is responsible for overseeing all aspects of graduate administration from admission to degree completion for more than 100 graduate students.

She also helped launch a new initiative offering a combined program  (BScH/MSc) that sees students in the fourth year of an honours program to take up to two courses in the department at the graduate level, allowing them to enter the graduate program with advanced standing.

Recently, Dr. Winn has developed a proposal in collaboration with the School of Computing for interdisciplinary graduate programs in biomedical informatics that include a diploma and professional master’s. She has also developed a proposal in collaboration with the offices of Postgraduate and Undergraduate Medical Education for graduate programs in medical sciences that include a diploma and professional master’s.

Dr. Winn also serves on a CIHR Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarship selection committee.

In receiving the award, Dr. Winn provides the following advice for incoming graduate coordinators:

“I have a standing weekly meeting with the program assistants, which I have found to be extremely helpful for keeping well-informed and in touch with of all of issues that need attention. Nurture this relationship as it will serve you well."

A heartfelt honour

Queen’s professor Adrian Baranchuk recognized as one of the 10 most influential Hispanic Canadians.

One of Canada’s leading experts in cardiology, Queen’s University professor Adrian Baranchuk has been named one of the TD Bank's 10 most influential Hispanic Canadians by the Hispanic Business Alliance. The awards recognize community members who demonstrate influence in education, achievements, volunteerism and/or entrepreneurship.

Queen's professor Adrian Baranchuk has been named one of the 10 most influential Hispanic Canadians.

This is the 10th Anniversary of the award, and this year, the Secretary General of the Organization of American States (OAS), Luis Almagro has been invited to deliver the awards during the ceremony in Toronto.

“This is truly one of the greatest honours I have received in my life,” says Dr. Baranchuk. “To be recognized as a leader is humbling and unexpected. I came to Canada with virtually nothing but I’ve worked very hard to establish myself. Canada, and its health care system have facilitated my integration into a new medical culture and has allowed me to develop into the professional that I am today.”

A native of Buenos Aires, Argentina, Dr. Baranchuk earned his MD from the University of Buenos Aires in 1990. After beginning to build his profile as a cardiologist-electrophysiologist, Dr. Baranchuk immigrated to Canada in 2003. In September 2003, Dr. Baranchuk was appointed as a clinical fellow in electrophysiology at McMaster University. He joined the division of cardiology at Queen’s in June of 2006.

"This is truly one of the greatest honours I have received in my life. To be recognized as a leader is humbling and unexpected."

In 2007, he created the Electrophysiology Training Program – a two-year program at Queen’s which teaches physicians from around the world new and sophisticated techniques to treat and cure cardiac arrhythmias. The program has attracted physicians from Canada, the United Kingdom, Chile, Argentina, South Africa, Emirates, Pakistan, Turkey, Dominican Republic and Ireland.

Dr. Baranchuk also founded and led the Broadcasting ECG Rounds to South-eastern Ontario (BESO project) – a program which allows Ontario physicians and students to join weekly training sessions in electrocardiology at Queen’s. His last iBook called Electrocardiography in practice: What to do? was released in iTunes in June 2016. The free application, which has been downloaded more than 1,000 times, is designed to teach electrocardiography in an interactive way.

Through these teaching programs, Dr. Baranchuk has mentored more than 40 medical students, 40 internal medicine residents and many more cardiology residents, fellows and colleagues from Queen’s and overseas. Dr. Baranchuk now serves as the head of the Kingston General Hospital Heart Rhythm Service.

“Being named one of the most influential Hispanic Canadians is a true honour and recognizes Dr. Baranchuk’s talent and drive,” says Dr. Steven Liss, Vice-Principal (Research). “Not only is he a leading cardiologist, Dr. Baranchuk is a motivator in our community and has worked tirelessly to ensure young students and young doctors achieve their potential.”

Dr. Baranchuk is currently the Vice President of the Inter American Society of Cardiology (IASC). He leads the IASC Academy which allows trainees from Latin America to attend courses and observerships in top centers of North America. Dr Baranchuk is the President Elect of the International Society of Electrocardiology and in this role, he engages colleagues and researchers from the region in educational and research activities.

Dr. Baranchuk says his life, both past and present, have driven him to his present successes. “I am obligated to give back because I am truly blessed in my life,” he says with a smile. “About 80 per cent of the people living in Latin America have no chance to pursue their dreams but I represent the 20 per cent that are lucky, that are blessed. This means I need to help others reach their dreams and goals. I am passionate about that.”

The OAS consists of the 35 independent states of the Americas, including Canada and the United States, and constitutes the main political, juridical, and social governmental forum in the Northern Hemisphere. The four main pillars include democracy, human rights, security and development.

For more information about the award visit the website

Two CCTG trials earn top honours

Canadian Cancer Society names two Canadian Cancer Trials Group trials best of 2016.

Two trials supported by the Canadian Cancer Trials Group (CCTG) based at Queen’s University were selected by the Canadian Cancer Society’s list of the top 10 research impact stories for 2016.

The two trials – which revealed new techniques to improve glioblastoma survival in the elderly and demonstrated how extending hormone therapy could keep breast cancer at bay, respectively – were presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology’s annual meeting.

“These trials are representative of the key work of the CCTG to identify new cancer treatments,” says Janet Dancey, CCTG director. “The group continues to bring forward the best ideas for new treatments from Canadian investigators and prove their benefit in trials conducted across Canada and internationally. The impact of these results will resonate and improve the outcomes for patients with cancer around the world.”

Chris O’Callaghan (Oncology) was the senior investigator on the CE.6 trial, which examined the use of the cancer drug temozolomide in the treatment of glioblastoma – an incurable form of brain cancer.  The trial found that adding the drug to a shortened course of radiation therapy, followed by monthly maintenance doses, significantly improved the survival rate of elderly patients.

“The results of the CE.6 trial build on CCTG's previous work in establishing the international standard of care for the treatment of glioblastoma by confirming the optimal therapy for elderly patients suffering from this disease,” says Dr. O’Callaghan.

Wendy Parulekar (Oncology) supervised the MA.17R trial, which examined the extension of aromatase inhibitor treatment in postmenopausal women with early breast cancer. The study found that extending aromatase inhibitor treatment from five to 10 years reduces the risk of recurrence by 34 per cent.

Results of this trial mean that women and their doctors will be able to make a more informed decision about whether they want to extend treatment.

“The selection of the MA.17R trial as a top 10 research impact story of 2016 demonstrates the value of collaboration between patients and health care professionals to test new treatment strategies aimed at improving breast cancer outcomes,” says Dr. Parulekar. “CCTG is committed to building on the results of MA.17R to understand the multidimensional impact of breast cancer therapies on patient’s lives.”

For more information visit the Canadian Cancer Society website.

The Canadian Cancer Trials Group (CCTG) is a cancer clinical trials cooperative group that conducts phase I-III trials testing anti-cancer and supportive therapies across Canada and internationally. It is a national program of the Canadian Cancer Society.  The CCTG's Central Operations and Statistics Office is located at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario.

The Canadian Cancer Society funds excellence through its highly competitive, gold standard expert-review selection process. Last year, the Society invested $44 million to fund the country’s most promising cancer research in cancer prevention, detection, diagnosis, treatment and quality of life for those living with and beyond cancer.

A dream come true

  • As part of her Queen's University experience, Verna Clancy, front row centre, attended a lecture by Una D'Elia (Art History). Joining her were Sheena Brazeau of Sienna Senior Living, left, and Erika Beresford-Kroeger, Strategic Initiatives Specialist, School of Rehabilitation Therapy.
    As part of her Queen's University experience, Verna Clancy, front row centre, attended a lecture by Una D'Elia (Art History). Joining her were Sheena Brazeau of Sienna Senior Living, left, and Erika Beresford-Kroeger, Strategic Initiatives Specialist, School of Rehabilitation Therapy.
  • Verna Clancy, left, listens to Judith Walker, docent at the Agnes Etherington Art Centre, during a special tour as part of her Queen's University experience.
    Verna Clancy, left, listens to Judith Walker, docent at the Agnes Etherington Art Centre, during a special tour as part of her Queen's University experience.
  • Verna Clancy, left, and Sheena Brazeau of Sienna Senior Living, right, receive a personal tour of the Agnes Etherington Art Centre from Judith Walker.
    Verna Clancy, left, and Sheena Brazeau of Sienna Senior Living, right, receive a personal tour of the Agnes Etherington Art Centre from Judith Walker.

Verna Clancy has always been drawn to art. She had even wanted to study the subject at university but never had the opportunity.

However, thanks to a collaboration between Queen’s School of Rehabilitation Therapy and Sienna Senior Living, Ms. Clancy was able to experience for herself what it’s like to study at the university.

Arriving at Etherington Hall at 9:30 am, Ms. Clancy first attended a lecture by Dr. Una D’Elia (Art History) ‘The Renaissance in Italy: The Rebirth of Classical Antiquity,’ part of an introductory course on Art in the West.  Continuing the experience, she had lunch at The Grad Club and completed her day with a guided tour of the Agnes Etherington Art Centre.

It was an unforgettable day, Ms. Clancy says, and was capped off with a personalized certificate of recognition from the School of Rehabilitation Therapy to commemorate her visit to campus.

“I think everybody should have (such an experience) at least once in their lifetime. I’ve learned so much today. Everybody’s been so kind and welcoming and I really appreciate everything everyone has done for me,” says Ms. Clancy, still excited by what she had learned in the art history lecture. “I didn’t realize what it covers. I didn’t realize it covers politics, wars and every topic going. It’s not just about studying an artist. It’s also the time, the culture.”

Ms. Clancy says she was able to connect  with the lecture on a personal level as she has traveled to Italy and viewed some of the paintings in person.

Through its signature Dreams Program, Sienna Senior Living, which operates three retirement homes and a long-term care facility in Kingston, aims to fulfill the life-long dreams of its residents.

In Ms. Clancy’s case Queen’s was also able to make her dream come true.

“While developing the School of Rehabilitation Therapy's new suite of graduate programs in Aging and Health, we had the opportunity to meet several program managers from Sienna,” says Erika Beresford-Kroeger, Strategic Initiatives Specialist, School of Rehabilitation Therapy. “When I was later contacted by Royale Place in Kingston, we were thrilled to help in any way we could. It was inspiring to experience the excitement from everyone across campus, particularly those in Art History and the Agnes, who helped the school make Verna’s dream come true.”  

Distinguished recognition

[Stephen Archer]
Stephen Archer, Head of the Department of Medicine at Queen’s, is the 2016 recipient of the Distinguished Scientist Award from the American Heart Association. (University Communications)

Stephen Archer, Head of the Department of Medicine at Queen’s, recently received a prestigious award from one of the world’s leading organizations for cardiovascular health and research.

Dr. Archer is the 2016 recipient of the Distinguished Scientist Award from the American Heart Association. The award, created in 2003, honours American Heart Association members who have made extraordinary contributions to cardiovascular and stroke research.

The award recognizes Dr. Archer’s lifetime of ground-breaking research and a long list of discoveries that have advanced care for patients with pulmonary hypertension and cancer.

A world-renowned cardiologist and scientist, Dr. Archer first arrived at Queen’s to study medicine and graduated in 1981. He then completed his Internal Medicine Residency and Cardiology Fellowship at the University of Minnesota before becoming a Faculty Cardiologist at the University of Minnesota for 10 years.

Moving back to Canada in 1998, Dr. Archer served as Chief of Cardiology at the University of Alberta for nine years before moving on to the University of Chicago. After four years as Chief of Cardiology there, he returned to Queen’s as Head of the Department of Medicine.

“Dr. Archer is not only an outstanding scientist and cardiologist, but he is also an outstanding leader,” says Richard Reznick, Dean of the Faculty of Health Sciences. “Here at Queen’s, he has had a transformational impact on the Department of Medicine and its research portfolio. In just a few months, the Queen’s CardioPulmonary Unit, a state-of-the-art international research unit spearheaded by Dr. Archer, will open its doors on campus.”

Dr. Archer holds a Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in Mitochondrial Dynamics and Translational Medicine and recently received a $4 million CIHR Foundation Award to support a project examining the mechanism of mitochondrial fission with a focus on understanding the interaction between an enzyme called dynamic relate protein 1 (Drp1) and its four binding partners.

His clinical interests include pulmonary hypertension, persistent ductus arteriosus, strategies for improving cardiovascular care, and training the next generation of physician-scientists. He has published 200 papers and his translational cardiovascular research has been recognized with numerous awards.

Dr. Archer is also the president of the Canadian Association of Professors of Medicine (CAPM), which promotes academic medicine and its sub-specialties through the effective management of academic Departments of Medicine along with the advancement of research, education and patient care.

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