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William Leggett receives prestigious lifetime achievement award

Dr. William Leggett.

William Leggett, professor emeritus in the Department of Biology and Queen's 17th principal, has received the H. Ahlstrom Lifetime Achievement Award from the Early Life History Section of the American Fisheries Society for his contributions to the fields of larval fish ecology.

The American Fisheries Society is the biggest association of professional aquatic ecologists in the world, with over 9,000 members worldwide.

"œIt feels good to be singled out by such large group of people who I respect so highly," says Dr. Leggett. "œI didn'™t expect to receive this award so it'™s a big honour and thrill to get it."

Dr. Leggett'™s research focuses on the dynamics of fish populations and his work as a biologist and a leader in education has been recognized nationally and internationally. A membership in the Order of Canada, a fellowship from the Royal Society of Canada, and the Award of Excellence in Fisheries Education are just some of the awards he has received for outstanding contributions to graduate education and marine science.

The Early Life History Section of the American Fisheries Society recognized Dr. Leggett'™s "œexceptional contributions to the understanding of early life history of fishes that has inspired the careers of a number of fisheries scientists worldwide and has led to major progress in fish ecology and studies of recruitment dynamics."

The award was recently presented in Quebec City at the 38th annual Larval Fish Conference held in conjunction with the 144th annual meeting of the American Fisheries Society.

 

Out of the classroom, into the wild

Queen’s biology course goes hands-on in the forests of Mexico.

Queen's in the World

From Feb. 14-27, a group of Queen’s biology students had the experience of a lifetime during a two-week field course in Jalisco, Mexico.

A collaborative effort between Queen’s and the Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, this combined undergraduate and graduate course provided students with the rare opportunity to explore the rich biological diversity of western Mexico’s cloud forests and dry tropical forests, and to study a range of exotic animals and plants in their native habitats.

Drs. Lougheed (Biology), Wang (Biology) and Ortiz (Universidad Michoacana) are photographed on Isla Pajarera - Bird Island. The three co-led the field course, which gaves students from Queen's and Universidad Michoacana the opportunity to spend two weeks hands-on with a wide array of plants and animals in two Mexican field stations. (Supplied Photo)

Stephen Lougheed (Biology) led the course along with Queen’s colleague Yuxiang Wang (Biology) and Javier Salgado Ortiz, a Queen’s biology alumnus and now professor at Universidad Michoacana. Dr. Lougheed says the course allowed both Canadian and Mexican students to experience first-hand ecological interactions and species that they may have studied in the classroom, as well as learn about other cultures and research from other regions of the world.

“One of the highlights for students was interacting with professors and fellow students in a field context from dawn to well past dusk,” says Dr. Lougheed. “I think that changes the perspective a lot – seeing not only the tremendous research being conducted, but some of the challenges faced by field biologists as well.”

Students pose in front of the sign at Estación Cientifica Las Joyas - one of two field stations visited during the course. (Supplied Photo).

During their two weeks in the field, the class visited two field stations: Estación de Biología Chamela and Estación Cientifica Las Joyas. In Las Joyas, the students explored the cloud forests – a type of evergreen montane tropical forest famous for its high humidity, low-level cloud cover, and unique diversity. The students studied aspects of the ecology of some of the animals and plants inhabiting the forest, gathering data that will be evaluated for a final project they will complete upon their return.

Students also visited Isla Pajarera – Bird Island – where they observed American oystercatchers, magnificent frigate birds, brown boobies, and other varieties of birds associated with these coastal environments. Dr. Lougheed says that, while the logistics of traveling to remote research locations can be a challenge, these immersive learning opportunities more than make up for it.

“We try to teach these courses in locales that are somewhat remote and relatively pristine,” explains Dr. Lougheed. “Located on the border between the Neotropic and Nearctic biogeographic realms, Jalisco has exceptional diversity and a unique mix of species. There is some terrific ecological research being done here by Mexican scientists, as well as important conservation initiatives.”

While the course may sound like a vacation, the students and professors were kept plenty busy with seminars, field exercises, long hikes, and research for their final assignment.

Throughout the course, students posted daily summaries of the course to a course blog. To learn more about field course offerings, please visit the Queen’s Biology Department website.

Queen’s offers a number of opportunities for students to undertake international study experiences – through field courses abroad, exchange programs, or studying at the Bader International Study Centre (BISC). For more information, please visit the Queen’s University International website.

 

Views from around the world and home

  • Overall Winner – Golden Mountain, Anja-Xiaoxing Cui (PhD candidate, Psychology), San Francisco
    Overall Winner – Golden Mountain, Anja-Xiaoxing Cui (PhD candidate, Psychology), San Francisco
  • Landscape and Nature – Mommy, Roar!, Leanna Li (Comm’18), Serengeti, Tanzania, Africa
    Landscape and Nature – Mommy, Roar!, Leanna Li (Comm’18), Serengeti, Tanzania, Africa
  • Home Away From Home – Mother Knows Best, Tommy Hana (Artsci’17), Venice, Italy
    Home Away From Home – Mother Knows Best, Tommy Hana (Artsci’17), Venice, Italy
  • People and Culture – Hoge Brug Afternoon, Jordan Davis (Artsci’18), Maastricht, Netherlands
    People and Culture – Hoge Brug Afternoon, Jordan Davis (Artsci’18), Maastricht, Netherlands
  • Critical Global Issues – Nuru, Through the Lens, Rika Wong (Artsci’20), Mombasa, Kenya
    Critical Global Issues – Nuru, Through the Lens, Rika Wong (Artsci’20), Mombasa, Kenya
  • People’s Choice Award – 1 am Sunset, David Williams (Law’19), Nahanni National Park Reserve, NWT
    People’s Choice Award – 1 am Sunset, David Williams (Law’19), Nahanni National Park Reserve, NWT
  • Staff Pick – BISC Castle, Ramolen Laruan (BFA’18), Herstmonceux Castle, East Sussex, England
    Staff Pick – BISC Castle, Ramolen Laruan (BFA’18), Herstmonceux Castle, East Sussex, England

From the Serengeti in Tanzania to atop a mountain in New Zealand to beneath a giant Canadian flag at Richardson Stadium beauty can be found around the world as the 9th annual Queen’s University International Centre Photo Contest shows.

The winning image, as selected by a panel of judges, was submitted by Anja-Xiaoxing Cui, a PhD candidate in the Department of Psychology, capturing a golden sunset in San Francisco

“The contest highlights student learning when their personal cultural lens and their camera lens intertwine to convey the significant experiences they have while abroad or as newcomers to Canada,” says Hanna Stanbury, Programs Coordinator, QUIC.

For the winning photograph Ms. Cui explains that during a conference trip to San Francisco last year, she wanted to retrace Chinese American history by taking photos of Chinatown, where many of the Chinese farm workers who lost their jobs through the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 found refuge. Instead, this photo of San Francisco Bay provided a better image as the mountains on the other side were bathed in golden light, the Golden Gate Bridge in clear view and a ship sailed lazily on the water. San Francisco’s Chinese name translates to Old Gold Mountain. 

“I am very pleasantly surprised,” Ms. Cui says. “I had seen the photos that some other students had submitted in the past, and was always very impressed by how far Queen’s students travel and the incredible images they brought back. The scene of which I took the picture left a lasting impression on me, and I am excited that I get to share it with more people.” 

Other winners include:
• Landscape and Nature, Leanna Li (Comm’18)
• People and Culture, Jordan Davis Artsci’18
• Home Away From Home, Tommy Hana (Artsci’17)
• Critical Global Issues, Rika Wong (Artsci’20)
• People’s Choice Award, David Williams (Law’19)
• Staff Pick, Ramolen Laruan, BFA’18

 A special display of the photos is being held at the QUIC in the John Deutsch University Centre, starting Tuesday, March 7 at 4:30 pm. See more submissions online.

A return to Stockholm

Professor Art McDonald part of Canadian delegation on Governor General's State Visit to Sweden.

  • Queen's Professor Emeritus Art McDonald and His Excellency the Right Honourable David Johnston, Governor General of Canada, lace up the skates in Sweden. Dr. McDonald accompanied the Governor General to Sweden during a State Visit from Feb 19-23. (Photo Credit: Rideau Hall)
    Queen's Professor Emeritus Art McDonald and His Excellency the Right Honourable David Johnston, Governor General of Canada, lace up the skates in Sweden. Dr. McDonald accompanied the Governor General to Sweden during a State Visit from Feb 19-23. (Photo Credit: Rideau Hall)
  • Dr. McDonald takes part in a keynote panel on opportunities for Canada and Sweden to work together as partners in learning and innovation to members of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. Dr. McDonald joined His Excellency the Right Honourable David Johnston, Governor General of Canada as a delegate on a State Visit to Sweden from Feb 19-23. (Photo Credit: Rideau Hall)
    Dr. McDonald takes part in a keynote panel on opportunities for Canada and Sweden to work together as partners in learning and innovation to members of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. Dr. McDonald joined His Excellency the Right Honourable David Johnston, Governor General of Canada as a delegate on a State Visit to Sweden from Feb 19-23. (Photo Credit: Rideau Hall)
  • Dr. McDonald attends a presentation on the Mats Sundin Fellowship in Developmental Health. This was followed by a discussion with the Karolinska Institute and Mats Sundin Fellowship officials on how to encourage and support education and innovation opportunities. (Photo Credit: Rideau Hall)
    Dr. McDonald attends a presentation on the Mats Sundin Fellowship in Developmental Health. This was followed by a discussion with the Karolinska Institute and Mats Sundin Fellowship officials on how to encourage and support education and innovation opportunities. (Photo Credit: Rideau Hall)
  • Dr. McDonald addresses fellow attendees and Mats Sundin Fellowship officials on how to encourage and support education and innovation opportunities. (Photo Credit: Rideau Hall)
    Dr. McDonald addresses fellow attendees and Mats Sundin Fellowship officials on how to encourage and support education and innovation opportunities. (Photo Credit: Rideau Hall)

From February 19-23, Queen's professor emeritus Art McDonald joined Their Excellencies the Right Honourable David Johnston, Governor General of Canada, and Mrs. Sharon Johnston as part of the Canadian delegation on a State visit to Sweden. The visit aimed at connecting Canadian parliamentarians and leaders from academia, innovation, trade and civil society with their Swedish counterparts to strengthen ties and promote new opportunities. The visit’s main theme was innovative inclusive and sustainable societies.

Amongst the notable events during the visit were a roundtable with officials from the Karolinska Institute (KI) and the Mats Sundin Fellowship in Developmental Health and a keynote and panel discussion at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences (KVA) on the possibilities for collaboration between Canadian and Swedish researchers.

Inspired to create social change

  • The Dunin-Deshpande Queen’s Innovation Centre (DDQIC) recently led a delegation of students to attend the Development Dialogue 2017 Conference in Hubballi, India. The social innovation conference is hosted by the foundation created by Gururaj and Jaishree Deshpande.
    The Dunin-Deshpande Queen’s Innovation Centre (DDQIC) recently led a delegation of students to attend the Development Dialogue 2017 Conference in Hubballi, India. The social innovation conference is hosted by the foundation created by Gururaj and Jaishree Deshpande.
  • Queen’s students from the Dunin-Deshpande Queen’s Innovation Centre (DDQIC) delegation tour a food preparation facility during their visit to India in January
    Queen’s students from the Dunin-Deshpande Queen’s Innovation Centre (DDQIC) delegation tour a food preparation facility during their visit to India in January
  • The Dunin-Deshpande Queen’s Innovation Centre (DDQIC) delegation got a first-hand look at a number of entrepreneurial projects currently underway in India.
    The Dunin-Deshpande Queen’s Innovation Centre (DDQIC) delegation got a first-hand look at a number of entrepreneurial projects currently underway in India.

In late January, the Dunin-Deshpande Queen’s Innovation Centre (DDQIC) led a delegation of students from Queen’s University to attend the Development Dialogue 2017 Conference in Hubballi, India. 

The delegation consisted of student alumni of the Queen’s Innovation Centre Summer Initiative (QICSI) program, representatives from student-led conferences and members of the DDQIC executive. The conference, hosted by the Deshpande Foundation, not only allowed the group to have the opportunity to engage in panels regarding global entrepreneurship but the delegation also had the chance to visit the sites of a variety of NGOs and start-ups that are leading social innovation in the region.

Included amongst the delegates was Kerry Readwin, a Queen’s student and co-founder of Northsprout, a QICSI initiative that is developing a soil additive to improve water efficiency and increasing crop yields.

“The entrepreneurial drive I saw to create an impact in people’s day-to-day lives reminded me of the importance of staying true to the mission of your business endeavours,” says Ms. Readwin. “The network of people all over the world trying to make our world a better place is truly inspiring. I can’t wait to take what I have learned and use it to drive my own startup forward.”

This sentiment was also shared by another Queen’s delegate, Louisa Walch, co-chair of Enactus Queen’s, a community of student, academic and business leaders committed to using the power of entrepreneurial action to transform and build a more sustainable future at both Queen’s and the broader community.

“The challenges we face in Canada are different than in India, but there are still many that exist. The Deshpande Foundation inspired me to think positively about the ability to make change happen, and to commit time on eradicating identified issues,” says Ms. Walch.

It is clear that the conference has motivated both young women to look beyond their immediate scope and advocate for ethical change to build sustainable initiatives and create social change within their communities.

For more information visit the Dunin-Deshpande Queen’s Innovation Centre website.

Cross-cultural exchange through music and mixing

  • Evergreen Club Contemporary Gamelan
    Queen's staff, students, and faculty listen to members of Evergreen Club Contemporary Gamelan speak during an informal talk ahead of the group's performance at The Isabel.
  • Provost, Evergreen Club Contemporary Gamelan
    Queen's Provost Benoit-Antoine Bacon, second from left, chats with international and domestic students during the reception before Evergreen Club Contemporary Gamelan's performance.
  • Student, Evergreen Club Contemporary Gamelan
    International and domestic students mingle during the reception at The Isabel Feb. 7.

Queen's international and domestic students, along with staff, faculty, and senior administrators gathered at The Isabel earlier this week for an evening of music and intercultural exchange. The event was the third in the International at Home series, which aims to bring together international and domestic students at several cultural events throughout the year.

This week, the community heard the unique sounds of Evergreen Club Contemporary Gamelan, an ensemble of eight highly skilled Canadian musicians who perform and record using an assortment of bronze and wooden instruments from Indonesia. These intruments are collectively known as a gamelan, a traditional instrument ensemble that plays an important role in Indonesian culture.

Ahead of the performance Feb. 7, community members mingled during a reception and had the chance to hear from some of the evening's performers about their music and history.

The International at Home series is hosted by the Office of the Associate Vice-Principal (International) and the Isabel Bader Centre for the Performing Arts. The next performance in the series will be held March 29, 2017, featuring Measha Brueggergosman.

Full details are available on the Queen’s International website. Faculties, departments, and units interested in sponsoring student tickets are asked to contact international@queensu.ca

Big Data's promise and perils for health-care delivery

Queen's in the World

Exploring Big Data, and its great promise and serious perils for the delivery of health care, will be the theme of a lecture presented at Queen’s Feb. 7 by Dartmouth College Professor Denise Anthony. The talk – titled Big Data, Cybersecurity, and Health Care – is the first lecture of the Matariki Network of Universities Lecture Series and part of the Queen’s Big Data 175th Anniversary series.

“We are very pleased to host this inaugural Matariki Network lecture. Not only is it an opportunity to deepen our connection with Dartmouth College and our other Matariki partners around the world, but it is a chance to hear from an expert, Dr. Anthony, who brings a wealth of knowledge on a subject that is pertinent to all of us,” says Daniel Woolf, Principal and Vice-Chancellor.

Denise Anthony, Vice Provost for Academic Initiatives and Professor of Sociology at Dartmouth College, will visit Queen's Feb. 6-10 and give a lecture on Big Data, cybersecurity, and heath care on Feb. 7. (Supplied photo)

In the lecture, Dr. Anthony will illuminate the important implications of rushing to turn the digital promise into reality, without understanding how Big Data analytics change institutions. For the institutions of health-care delivery, the use of Big Data will require changes in information governance that affect not only the security and privacy of health information, but also the role of patients, the profession of medicine, and the meaning of health itself, says Dr. Anthony in her abstract.

Dr. Anthony, who is vice provost for academic initiatives and professor of sociology at Dartmouth, has held adjunct appointments at the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy & Clinical Practice and at Geisel School of Medicine. She was also research director of the Institute for Security, Technology, and Society from 2008-2013.

During her visit to Queen’s, Dr. Anthony will meet with colleagues and students in the Queen’s Surveillance Studies Centre and continue to develop Queen’s-Dartmouth collaborations through visits with Queen’s senior administrators.

“I am so honoured to be part of Queen’s University’s 175th celebration. What an impressive milestone! The Matariki Network is really a unique and special partnership among seven institutions across seven countries, and this kind of international collaboration seems especially important right now in an uncertain world,” says Dr. Anthony. “I have been a long-time admirer of the Surveillance Studies Centre, and particularly the work of Professor David Lyon and his colleagues and students, who are world leaders in helping us to understand the impact – positive and negative – of Big Data in our world today. I look forward to meeting with many students and scholars at Queen’s University over the course of my visit.”

Dr. Anthony’s lecture will take place on Tuesday, Feb. 7 at 6:30 pm in the Britton Smith Foundation Lecture Theatre, School of Medicine. A reception will take place beforehand, beginning at 5:30 pm, and all are invited.

The Matariki Network of Universities is composed of seven like-minded, research-intensive universities from around the world. One of the network’s aims is to build on the collective strengths of its member institutions to develop international excellence in research and education. Within the network, each institution is responsible for advancing a key research theme, with Dartmouth focused on cybersecurity.

The Queen’s anniversary series, Big Data 175, has been designed to engage intellectually and practically with a major analytic development and pressing public issue, from multi-disciplinary and cross-campus perspectives. The series, organized by a cross-campus, multi-faculty group, has so far held three events, with more planned for 2017. Visit the website for more details.

 

Opportunities for international collaboration

Queen's in the World

Applications are open for the International Visitors Program of the Principal’s Development Fund, a program that helps connect Queen’s with academics and institutions around the world by sponsoring visits by international scholars. The program also works to foster connections between Queen’s and its partners within the Matariki Network of Universities.

“This program provides a tremendous opportunity for collaboration and cross-pollination of ideas between the Queen’s community and scholars and universities around the globe,” says Daniel Woolf, Principal and Vice-Chancellor. “I am very pleased to offer this funding as part of our ongoing support for international partnerships and, in particular, alliances with the Matariki Network.”

Last year, Professor Karol Miller from the University of Western Australia visited Queen's through the International Visitors Program of the Principal's Development Fund.

The International Visitors Program includes three application categories, each of which offers grants of up to $3,000. Category one is the open program, which helps to cover the costs of bringing an international scholar to Queen’s for a period of at least three days. 

The other two application categories focus on leveraging Queen’s membership in the Matariki Network of Universities. One of these is an extension of the visiting scholars program, specifically aimed at bringing visitors to Queen’s from the other Matariki universities, which include the University of Western Australia (UWA), Tübingen University, Uppsala University, Dartmouth College, University of Otago, and Durham University. Last year, Professor Karol Miller from UWA visited Queen’s through the program and gave a talk about his research into computational biomechanics at the School of Computing Distinguished Speaker Seminar.

The third application category provides funding to assist Queen’s faculty and staff to travel to Matariki partner institutions to build new collaborations. This seed funding may be used to initiate new academic, research, or administrative initiatives.

Applications for these categories are due to the relevant dean’s office by April 21, 2017. For more information, including program details and application forms, visit the Principal’s website.

Questions about the Principal’s Development Fund may be directed to Csilla Volford, Coordinator, International Projects and Events, in the Office of the Associate Vice-Principal (International).

 

Travel and immigration resources

Queen’s is committed to ensuring our university is a welcoming, inclusive, and respectful community, open to all, and is shocked and saddened by the tragic events that took place in Sainte-Foy, Que., on Sunday evening. Queen’s also joins Universities Canada and other institutions across Canada in expressing significant concerns about the executive order issued recently by the United States that imposes travel restrictions on individuals from the following seven Muslim-majority countries: Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen.

Please read Principal Daniel Woolfs statement  

For anyone who is planning to travel to any country, including the United States, please review the Off Campus Activity Safety Policy.

If you have any questions regarding travel or immigration concerns, please contact the following offices:

Queen’s students with any questions should contact the Queen’s University International Centre by calling 613-533–2604 or emailing QUIC Director Jyoti Kotecha at kotechaj@queensu.ca.

Queen’s faculty and staff members with any questions should contact Monica Stewart, Coordinator, Faculty Relations and Support, by calling 613-533-3167 or emailing monica.stewart@queens.ca

Graduate students should contact Monica Corbett at 613-533-6100 or by email at corbettm@queensu.ca or Kim McAuley at 613-533-6000 ext. 77562 or by email at mcauleyk@queens.ca and Marta Straznicky at 613-533-6000 ext. 77557 or by email at straznic@queensu.ca

For 24/7 inquiries and support, the university’s emergency report centre can be accessed by calling 613- 533-6111.

If you are a dual citizen, permanent resident, on a work permit or a student on a study permit (visa) from one of the countries affected by the U.S. executive order, and have questions about travelling to the United States, please visit the QUIC website for further information.

If you have difficulties at the border, please contact your country of citizenship Embassy or Consulate. To find the one nearest to you please visit embassy.goabroad.com

For immigration-specific questions, please contact Immigration and Citizenship Canada.

Anyone in need of campus-based support is encouraged to contact Student Wellness Services at 613-533-6000 ext. 78264 and/or the University Interfaith Chaplain, Kate Johnson, at 613-533-2186. Support for staff and faculty is available through the Employee and Family Assistance Program at 1-800-663-1142 or 1-866-398-9505.

The university will provide updates to this information as necessary.

 

Principal's Statement: Canadian values, Queen’s values

The following is a statement from Principal Daniel Woolf in response to the attack on a Quebec mosque and the US immigration ban.

While the Queen’s community addresses, internally, issues of race and inclusion at home, we also need to be mindful of what is happening in the rest of the world. Sunday evening’s attack at a mosque in Sainte-Foy, Que., is yet another reminder that even in Canada we are not immune to hatred and violence towards a group or individuals on the basis of their background, religion, or ethnicity.

The abrupt imposition of a halt on refugee admission in the United States and a particular ban on immigration from seven countries with an overwhelmingly Muslim population is a challenge to all of us who believe in an open and inclusive society. The values that underlie this divisive politics are not Canadian, and they are not those of Queen’s University.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has stated that Canada will continue to welcome those “fleeing persecution, terror, and war” regardless of faith and has reaffirmed that “diversity is our strength.” Queen’s, along with other Canadian universities, stands in support of those who may be affected by the US policy, in particular our international students and scholars.

Queen’s welcomes and supports students, faculty, and staff from all countries and backgrounds. They bring a wealth of experience and diverse perspectives, and strengthen our campus in myriad ways, from research and innovation to overall student learning experience.

The administration of Queen’s will work to ensure that our students and faculty travelling in or through the United States are not adversely affected by this change in US policy. But we may well need to go beyond this, and offer a safe haven in our university to faculty, staff, and students who suddenly find themselves in immigration limbo, unable to return to a US home and unable to go back to the country whence they travelled.

We are working within Queen’s on what we can do, and I am in discussion with other university leaders about concrete measures our institutions can take to help scholars affected by the ban.

At this stage we do not know how any of this is going to play out. But as a country, and as an individual university, it’s our obligation to do what we can to mitigate the consequences to faculty, students, and staff.

Flags on campus are lowered and will remain at half-mast until Wednesday morning out of respect for the victims of the Quebec mosque shootings.

Resources for the Queen's community regarding travel and immigration 

Universities Canada statement

Association of Public and Land-grant Universities

Canadian Tech Community

 

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