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Internationalization

Smith international program offers diverse dynamic

Queen's in the World

Angela James knows first-hand and through years of watching students come and go on international exchanges that “growth happens on the fringes, when you’re pushing yourself and being challenged.”

Ms. James, Director of the Centre for International Management in Smith School of Business, felt it herself when she backpacked through Europe, and throughout her career in international education, which began at the University of Waterloo working in recruitment and as an academic adviser, a job that saw her welcoming and sending out exchange students.

“I was really shocked to see the transformation of students, both those who had gone on exchange overseas or who came to Canada to study. I thought, ‘this is something we can’t teach in the classroom,’” she says.

The Centre for International Management team includes, from left to right, Aileen Dong, Giovanna Crocco, Tenay Bartzis, Jacoba Franks, Angela James, Alison Darling, Alison Doyle, Kerri Regan, and Alina Jumabaeva. (Missing from the photo is Emily Mantha, who is on leave until 2018.) The staff members bring a wealth of expertise, including fluency in French, Italian, Korean, Mandarin, Russian, and Spanish.

Now at Smith, Ms. James provides support, along with a team of eight others, to about 1,200 incoming and outgoing students every year (the largest international mobility program for exchange at Queen’s).

Within the Centre for International Management, there are two units, one providing support to the Commerce program and another supporting the school’s graduate and professional master’s programs, including the Master of International Business (MIB), the MBA, the Master of Finance-Beijing, and the Saudi Industrial Development Fund program.

Since Ms. James began as director 12 years ago, and through focused goals set by Dean David Saunders, the centre has gradually increased the number of students participating in exchange and the number of schools Smith partners with around the world.

“When I started, it was just me and one other person. We were solely doing Commerce exchange and we were exchanging just over 200 students, with about 30 partners. Now, we have close to 120 partners in 35 countries, supporting about 1,200 students,” explains Ms. James, who worked at the Bader International Study Centre in the U.K. in admissions before joining Smith.

Diverse dynamic

The benefit of such a well-developed international program is the diversity of people and perspectives in the classroom, with upper-year classes almost 50 per cent exchange students and a big push within the school to keep bringing in a more diverse faculty complement.

“Professors and students both love the dynamic this creates and they are insisting on making it more diverse,” says Ms. James.

For international students, she explains, Smith and Queen’s are very attractive options. Many of them come from top business schools found in large city centres around the world, and they love the small size of Kingston, the community spirit at Queen’s, and small class sizes at Smith. There is also great opportunity to interact and make friends with Canadian students through group work and through a student-led Exchange and Transfer Committee, which organizes events with the goal of integrating exchange students into life at Queen’s.

For domestic students, going out on exchange is an opportunity to launch themselves away from the safety net of Queen’s (and the busy social life) and gain new perspectives on the world, politics, and global affairs. Every student who comes to Smith is guaranteed a spot on exchange if they want it, and because international education is an integral part of the MIB program, it is integrated into each student’s experience, either through exchange or one of 11 double degree programs.

“Change happens tenfold on exchange. Often, they are living in a big city centre and experiencing culture shock and missing home. They are able to better define who they are as a person,” says Ms. James. “They come back with a new sense of self-confidence and independence. And we help them verbalize the change they’ve gone through and translate their experience so they can include that on their resume. The international experience remains vivid for a long time – it lingers longer, with students reflecting on it for years to come.”

***

The Centre for International Management recently ran a photography contest for students on exchange. View their impressive photos on the Smith Facebook page.

Internationalization is one of the four pillars of the Queen’s University Strategic Framework 2014–2019. The Comprehensive International Plan was launched in August 2015 to help the university build on its international strengths and direct future internationalization efforts. The plan’s goals include strengthening Queen’s international research engagement and creating more opportunities for student mobility through academic exchange and study-abroad programs. The plan also aims to attract high-quality international students to Queen’s and to increase international educational opportunities on Queen’s campus. Learn more on the International website.

 

Bound for BISC

Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) Benoit-Antoine Bacon has announced the appointment of J. Hugh Horton as vice-provost and executive director, Bader International Study Centre (BISC) and Herstmonceux Castle Enterprises (HCE) for a five-year term effective July 1, 2017.

[Hugh Horton]
Hugh Horton has been appointed vice-provost and executive director, Bader International Study Centre (BISC) and Herstmonceux Castle Enterprises (HCE).

“I am very pleased that Dr. Hugh Horton has accepted this appointment,” says Dr. Bacon. “Hugh has extensive international experience as well as an impressive academic and leadership record. Hugh has a deep understanding of both the BISC and Queen’s and will bring tremendous personal integrity, conscientiousness and commitment to this role.”

Dr. Horton is a professor of chemistry and is currently serving as the interim vice-dean in the Faculty of Arts and Science. Over the past seven years, he has held a number of leadership positions within the faculty, including associate dean (studies) and associate dean (international).

In his current role, Dr. Horton is responsible for six academic departments while retaining responsibilities for the international portfolio of the Faculty of Arts and Science. He has worked as the academic liaison between the BISC and Arts and Science, notably leading the development and launch of the first-year science program at the BISC. He has led several Queen’s delegations to China to negotiate 2+2 programs and study abroad agreements. He was also responsible for introducing the Queen’s Undergraduate Internship Program in the Faculty of Arts and Science. 

Dr. Horton will work with the current BISC management team, who will continue in their respective roles, towards building on their remarkable accomplishments over the past few years.  

2+2 program gives Chinese students best of both worlds

Queen's in the World

Peiwen Li and Ying Chen agree that it’s great to have the best of both worlds – studying both at their home university, Tongji University in Shanghai, and here at Queen’s – through a 2+2 program between the two institutions that began in the fall of 2015.

“We get to experience both universities, receive degrees from both universities, and spend a long period of time in another country,” says Ms. Li, who, along with Ms. Chen and three others from Tongji, will graduate from the program this spring. “It is really useful to be here long enough to learn more about the culture and learn the language fully.”

Peiwen Li and Ying Chen will graduate this spring from the 2+2 program offered through Tongji University in Shanghai and Queen’s. Both will continue with graduate work at Queen’s this fall. (University Communications)

Students enrolled in the 2+2 program first spend two years at Tongji’s College of Environmental Science and Engineering and then, two years in Queen’s School of Environmental Studies. Upon graduation, they are awarded a degree from both universities.

“It has been a really good experience that has broadened our horizons,” says Ms. Chen, who has most enjoyed the field work at the Queen’s University Biology Station (QUBS) and an international field course in Mexico offered by Professor Stephen Lougheed, as well as a field course offered through Trent University in Hong Kong and Taiwan. “It’s been interesting to see the differences in the two education systems and the ways of teaching and learning. Knowing both academic worlds will likely help us with our work in the future.”

Ms. Chen and Ms. Li say the focus at Tongji was more on engineering, while at Queen’s, courses have centred on the social sciences. At Queen’s, they’ve had more flexibility in the courses they can choose, and they’ve enjoyed the longer summer break, which gave them the opportunity to seek out different experiences and spend time thinking about future possibilities (in China, students typically only have about two months off). They both have really appreciated the support from faculty members and teaching assistants, who have understood the challenges associated with studying in a second language and were able to direct them to resources across campus, such as the Writing Centre.

“The Tongji 2+2 program offers exciting opportunities for Chinese students joining us at Queen’s and it enriches teaching and learning experiences for all Queen’s students, staff and faculty who benefit from exposure to diverse and global perspectives,” says Alice Hovorka, Director, School of Environmental Studies. “Ultimately, such international programs promote cross-cultural understandings between our respective institutions and contexts.”

Ms. Li spent last summer working with Dr. Lougheed in a lab on campus – performing DNA extraction from fish samples – through the Summer Work Experience Program (SWEP), which she says was an excellent way to gain exposure to lab work. She also visited QUBS several times throughout the summer to attend seminars and the field station’s annual open house – all valuable experiences for Ms. Li.

“The Tongji 2+2 program offers exciting opportunities for Chinese students joining us at Queen’s and it enriches teaching and learning experiences for all Queen’s students, staff and faculty who benefit from exposure to diverse and global perspectives”
~ Alice Hovorka, Director, School of Environmental Studies

Also in her first year at Queen’s, Ms. Li received the Charles Baillie Environmental Studies Scholarship, awarded on the basis of excellence to students entering fourth year of any undergraduate degree program in the School of Environmental Studies.

“It was an honour to receive the award. It felt very encouraging,” says Ms. Li, who will continue with graduate work at Queen’s, beginning a PhD next fall with Dr. Lougheed studying Arctic ecosystems. Ms. Chen will also be staying at Queen’s and working on a master’s degree with Dr. Lougheed – but while Ms. Li loves the detailed focus of lab work, Ms. Chen loves being outside and in the field. Her graduate work will focus on frog phenology – looking at how different biological factors and cycles, such as temperature and humidity, affect their behaviour.

Four other Tongji students are currently enrolled in the first year of the two-year program and will complete their degrees in 2018.

The 2+2 program is one of several collaborations between Queen’s and Tongji University. In 2013, Queen’s and Tongji established the Sino-Canada Network for Environment and Sustainable Development, which provides a platform for research collaboration between faculty members at both institutions, and opportunities for exchange and training. In 2015, Queen’s began collaborating with Tongji on the International Research Laboratory of Yangtze River Ecology, or Intelab-Yangtze.

Internationalization in one of the four pillars of the Queen’s University Strategic Framework 2014–2019. The Comprehensive International Plan was launched in August 2015 to help the university build on its international strengths and direct future internationalization efforts. The plan’s goals include strengthening Queen’s international research engagement and creating more opportunities for student mobility through academic exchange and study-abroad programs. The plan also aims to attract high-quality international students to Queen’s and to increase international educational opportunities on Queen’s campus. China is a region of focus within the plan. For more information on the Queen’s-China Connection and Queen’s international program overall, visit the International website.

 

Researchers reach out globally

Queen's University researchers awarded $449,000 for Queen Elizabeth Scholars Network for Equity in Maternal Child Health.

Queen's in the World

Four global health researchers at Queen’s University and Kingston General Hospital Research Institute are aiming to change the lives of some of the world’s poorest and most vulnerable populations, particularly mothers and children.

Co-leaders Heather Aldersey (School of Rehabilitation Therapy), Susan Bartels (Emergency Medicine), Colleen Davison (Public Health Sciences), and Eva Purkey (Family Medicine) have been awarded $449,000 from the Queen Elizabeth II Scholars Program (QES) to establish the Queen Elizabeth Scholars Network for Equity in Maternal and Child Health.

Working together as part of the Queen Elizabeth Scholars Network for Equity in Maternal and Child Health are (l to r): Eva Purkey, Colleen Davison, Heather Aldersey, and Susan Bartels.

“Inequities in maternal and child health outcomes and access exist globally for certain groups, including those impacted by armed conflict, remote populations, displaced people, and people with disabilities. Unfortunately, these groups are rarely prioritized in research or policy,” says Dr. Aldersey.

The QES project is the first initiative of ARCH – a research collaborative for global health equity that is being established by the four researchers. ARCH will leverage their extensive experience working with partners in sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, the Americas, and the Canadian North, looking at the impacts of war, poverty, natural disasters, and preventable diseases on families and communities.

“The network is demonstrative of research that has the potential to have a tangible impact on people’s lives,” says Dr. John Fisher, Interim Vice-Principal (Research). “Importantly, it is also reflective of the fact that many of our scholars are building research capacity for real-world issues in both Canada and abroad.”

The funds will support the research, learning, and advocacy skills of 15 PhD students, post-doctoral fellows, or early career researchers from low- and middle-income countries as well as Canadian trainees in a series of international exchanges. These new scholars will also take part in a common, multi-country study looking at the factors that contribute to maternal and child health inequities.

“We hope to support and inspire global health researchers and to contribute to the evolution of Queen’s as a global health research leader,” says Dr. Davison.

Maternal and child mortality and morbidity is still high in many parts of the world and among particular subgroups, even within Canada. Internationally, it is estimated that six million children die every year before reaching the age of five. The maternal death rate in low- and middle-income countries is still 14 times higher than in developed regions.

“These are preventable outcomes, brought on by such factors as income disparities, lack of access to good quality services, and discrimination based on race, gender, and social class,” says Dr. Bartels.

“Our aim is to equip the next generation of maternal and child health researchers with the skills and knowledge to advocate for these vulnerable populations,” says Dr. Purkey.

The QES is managed through a unique partnership of Universities Canada, the Rideau Hall Foundation, Community Foundations of Canada, and Canadian universities. The QES is made possible with financial support from International Development Research Centre and the Social Science and Humanities Research Council.

Out of the classroom, into the wild

Queen’s biology course goes hands-on in the forests of Mexico.

Queen's in the World

From Feb. 14-27, a group of Queen’s biology students had the experience of a lifetime during a two-week field course in Jalisco, Mexico.

A collaborative effort between Queen’s and the Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, this combined undergraduate and graduate course provided students with the rare opportunity to explore the rich biological diversity of western Mexico’s cloud forests and dry tropical forests, and to study a range of exotic animals and plants in their native habitats.

Drs. Lougheed (Biology), Wang (Biology) and Ortiz (Universidad Michoacana) are photographed on Isla Pajarera - Bird Island. The three co-led the field course, which gaves students from Queen's and Universidad Michoacana the opportunity to spend two weeks hands-on with a wide array of plants and animals in two Mexican field stations. (Supplied Photo)

Stephen Lougheed (Biology) led the course along with Queen’s colleague Yuxiang Wang (Biology) and Javier Salgado Ortiz, a Queen’s biology alumnus and now professor at Universidad Michoacana. Dr. Lougheed says the course allowed both Canadian and Mexican students to experience first-hand ecological interactions and species that they may have studied in the classroom, as well as learn about other cultures and research from other regions of the world.

“One of the highlights for students was interacting with professors and fellow students in a field context from dawn to well past dusk,” says Dr. Lougheed. “I think that changes the perspective a lot – seeing not only the tremendous research being conducted, but some of the challenges faced by field biologists as well.”

Students pose in front of the sign at Estación Cientifica Las Joyas - one of two field stations visited during the course. (Supplied Photo).

During their two weeks in the field, the class visited two field stations: Estación de Biología Chamela and Estación Cientifica Las Joyas. In Las Joyas, the students explored the cloud forests – a type of evergreen montane tropical forest famous for its high humidity, low-level cloud cover, and unique diversity. The students studied aspects of the ecology of some of the animals and plants inhabiting the forest, gathering data that will be evaluated for a final project they will complete upon their return.

Students also visited Isla Pajarera – Bird Island – where they observed American oystercatchers, magnificent frigate birds, brown boobies, and other varieties of birds associated with these coastal environments. Dr. Lougheed says that, while the logistics of traveling to remote research locations can be a challenge, these immersive learning opportunities more than make up for it.

“We try to teach these courses in locales that are somewhat remote and relatively pristine,” explains Dr. Lougheed. “Located on the border between the Neotropic and Nearctic biogeographic realms, Jalisco has exceptional diversity and a unique mix of species. There is some terrific ecological research being done here by Mexican scientists, as well as important conservation initiatives.”

While the course may sound like a vacation, the students and professors were kept plenty busy with seminars, field exercises, long hikes, and research for their final assignment.

Throughout the course, students posted daily summaries of the course to a course blog. To learn more about field course offerings, please visit the Queen’s Biology Department website.

Queen’s offers a number of opportunities for students to undertake international study experiences – through field courses abroad, exchange programs, or studying at the Bader International Study Centre (BISC). For more information, please visit the Queen’s University International website.

 

Views from around the world and home

  • Overall Winner – Golden Mountain, Anja-Xiaoxing Cui (PhD candidate, Psychology), San Francisco
    Overall Winner – Golden Mountain, Anja-Xiaoxing Cui (PhD candidate, Psychology), San Francisco
  • Landscape and Nature – Mommy, Roar!, Leanna Li (Comm’18), Serengeti, Tanzania, Africa
    Landscape and Nature – Mommy, Roar!, Leanna Li (Comm’18), Serengeti, Tanzania, Africa
  • Home Away From Home – Mother Knows Best, Tommy Hana (Artsci’17), Venice, Italy
    Home Away From Home – Mother Knows Best, Tommy Hana (Artsci’17), Venice, Italy
  • People and Culture – Hoge Brug Afternoon, Jordan Davis (Artsci’18), Maastricht, Netherlands
    People and Culture – Hoge Brug Afternoon, Jordan Davis (Artsci’18), Maastricht, Netherlands
  • Critical Global Issues – Nuru, Through the Lens, Rika Wong (Artsci’20), Mombasa, Kenya
    Critical Global Issues – Nuru, Through the Lens, Rika Wong (Artsci’20), Mombasa, Kenya
  • People’s Choice Award – 1 am Sunset, David Williams (Law’19), Nahanni National Park Reserve, NWT
    People’s Choice Award – 1 am Sunset, David Williams (Law’19), Nahanni National Park Reserve, NWT
  • Staff Pick – BISC Castle, Ramolen Laruan (BFA’18), Herstmonceux Castle, East Sussex, England
    Staff Pick – BISC Castle, Ramolen Laruan (BFA’18), Herstmonceux Castle, East Sussex, England

From the Serengeti in Tanzania to atop a mountain in New Zealand to beneath a giant Canadian flag at Richardson Stadium beauty can be found around the world as the 9th annual Queen’s University International Centre Photo Contest shows.

The winning image, as selected by a panel of judges, was submitted by Anja-Xiaoxing Cui, a PhD candidate in the Department of Psychology, capturing a golden sunset in San Francisco

“The contest highlights student learning when their personal cultural lens and their camera lens intertwine to convey the significant experiences they have while abroad or as newcomers to Canada,” says Hanna Stanbury, Programs Coordinator, QUIC.

For the winning photograph Ms. Cui explains that during a conference trip to San Francisco last year, she wanted to retrace Chinese American history by taking photos of Chinatown, where many of the Chinese farm workers who lost their jobs through the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 found refuge. Instead, this photo of San Francisco Bay provided a better image as the mountains on the other side were bathed in golden light, the Golden Gate Bridge in clear view and a ship sailed lazily on the water. San Francisco’s Chinese name translates to Old Gold Mountain. 

“I am very pleasantly surprised,” Ms. Cui says. “I had seen the photos that some other students had submitted in the past, and was always very impressed by how far Queen’s students travel and the incredible images they brought back. The scene of which I took the picture left a lasting impression on me, and I am excited that I get to share it with more people.” 

Other winners include:
• Landscape and Nature, Leanna Li (Comm’18)
• People and Culture, Jordan Davis Artsci’18
• Home Away From Home, Tommy Hana (Artsci’17)
• Critical Global Issues, Rika Wong (Artsci’20)
• People’s Choice Award, David Williams (Law’19)
• Staff Pick, Ramolen Laruan, BFA’18

 A special display of the photos is being held at the QUIC in the John Deutsch University Centre, starting Tuesday, March 7 at 4:30 pm. See more submissions online.

A return to Stockholm

Professor Art McDonald part of Canadian delegation on Governor General's State Visit to Sweden.

  • Queen's Professor Emeritus Art McDonald and His Excellency the Right Honourable David Johnston, Governor General of Canada, lace up the skates in Sweden. Dr. McDonald accompanied the Governor General to Sweden during a State Visit from Feb 19-23. (Photo Credit: Rideau Hall)
    Queen's Professor Emeritus Art McDonald and His Excellency the Right Honourable David Johnston, Governor General of Canada, lace up the skates in Sweden. Dr. McDonald accompanied the Governor General to Sweden during a State Visit from Feb 19-23. (Photo Credit: Rideau Hall)
  • Dr. McDonald takes part in a keynote panel on opportunities for Canada and Sweden to work together as partners in learning and innovation to members of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. Dr. McDonald joined His Excellency the Right Honourable David Johnston, Governor General of Canada as a delegate on a State Visit to Sweden from Feb 19-23. (Photo Credit: Rideau Hall)
    Dr. McDonald takes part in a keynote panel on opportunities for Canada and Sweden to work together as partners in learning and innovation to members of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. Dr. McDonald joined His Excellency the Right Honourable David Johnston, Governor General of Canada as a delegate on a State Visit to Sweden from Feb 19-23. (Photo Credit: Rideau Hall)
  • Dr. McDonald attends a presentation on the Mats Sundin Fellowship in Developmental Health. This was followed by a discussion with the Karolinska Institute and Mats Sundin Fellowship officials on how to encourage and support education and innovation opportunities. (Photo Credit: Rideau Hall)
    Dr. McDonald attends a presentation on the Mats Sundin Fellowship in Developmental Health. This was followed by a discussion with the Karolinska Institute and Mats Sundin Fellowship officials on how to encourage and support education and innovation opportunities. (Photo Credit: Rideau Hall)
  • Dr. McDonald addresses fellow attendees and Mats Sundin Fellowship officials on how to encourage and support education and innovation opportunities. (Photo Credit: Rideau Hall)
    Dr. McDonald addresses fellow attendees and Mats Sundin Fellowship officials on how to encourage and support education and innovation opportunities. (Photo Credit: Rideau Hall)

From February 19-23, Queen's professor emeritus Art McDonald joined Their Excellencies the Right Honourable David Johnston, Governor General of Canada, and Mrs. Sharon Johnston as part of the Canadian delegation on a State visit to Sweden. The visit aimed at connecting Canadian parliamentarians and leaders from academia, innovation, trade and civil society with their Swedish counterparts to strengthen ties and promote new opportunities. The visit’s main theme was innovative inclusive and sustainable societies.

Amongst the notable events during the visit were a roundtable with officials from the Karolinska Institute (KI) and the Mats Sundin Fellowship in Developmental Health and a keynote and panel discussion at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences (KVA) on the possibilities for collaboration between Canadian and Swedish researchers.

Inspired to create social change

  • The Dunin-Deshpande Queen’s Innovation Centre (DDQIC) recently led a delegation of students to attend the Development Dialogue 2017 Conference in Hubballi, India. The social innovation conference is hosted by the foundation created by Gururaj and Jaishree Deshpande.
    The Dunin-Deshpande Queen’s Innovation Centre (DDQIC) recently led a delegation of students to attend the Development Dialogue 2017 Conference in Hubballi, India. The social innovation conference is hosted by the foundation created by Gururaj and Jaishree Deshpande.
  • Queen’s students from the Dunin-Deshpande Queen’s Innovation Centre (DDQIC) delegation tour a food preparation facility during their visit to India in January
    Queen’s students from the Dunin-Deshpande Queen’s Innovation Centre (DDQIC) delegation tour a food preparation facility during their visit to India in January
  • The Dunin-Deshpande Queen’s Innovation Centre (DDQIC) delegation got a first-hand look at a number of entrepreneurial projects currently underway in India.
    The Dunin-Deshpande Queen’s Innovation Centre (DDQIC) delegation got a first-hand look at a number of entrepreneurial projects currently underway in India.

In late January, the Dunin-Deshpande Queen’s Innovation Centre (DDQIC) led a delegation of students from Queen’s University to attend the Development Dialogue 2017 Conference in Hubballi, India. 

The delegation consisted of student alumni of the Queen’s Innovation Centre Summer Initiative (QICSI) program, representatives from student-led conferences and members of the DDQIC executive. The conference, hosted by the Deshpande Foundation, not only allowed the group to have the opportunity to engage in panels regarding global entrepreneurship but the delegation also had the chance to visit the sites of a variety of NGOs and start-ups that are leading social innovation in the region.

Included amongst the delegates was Kerry Readwin, a Queen’s student and co-founder of Northsprout, a QICSI initiative that is developing a soil additive to improve water efficiency and increasing crop yields.

“The entrepreneurial drive I saw to create an impact in people’s day-to-day lives reminded me of the importance of staying true to the mission of your business endeavours,” says Ms. Readwin. “The network of people all over the world trying to make our world a better place is truly inspiring. I can’t wait to take what I have learned and use it to drive my own startup forward.”

This sentiment was also shared by another Queen’s delegate, Louisa Walch, co-chair of Enactus Queen’s, a community of student, academic and business leaders committed to using the power of entrepreneurial action to transform and build a more sustainable future at both Queen’s and the broader community.

“The challenges we face in Canada are different than in India, but there are still many that exist. The Deshpande Foundation inspired me to think positively about the ability to make change happen, and to commit time on eradicating identified issues,” says Ms. Walch.

It is clear that the conference has motivated both young women to look beyond their immediate scope and advocate for ethical change to build sustainable initiatives and create social change within their communities.

For more information visit the Dunin-Deshpande Queen’s Innovation Centre website.

Cross-cultural exchange through music and mixing

  • Evergreen Club Contemporary Gamelan
    Queen's staff, students, and faculty listen to members of Evergreen Club Contemporary Gamelan speak during an informal talk ahead of the group's performance at The Isabel.
  • Provost, Evergreen Club Contemporary Gamelan
    Queen's Provost Benoit-Antoine Bacon, second from left, chats with international and domestic students during the reception before Evergreen Club Contemporary Gamelan's performance.
  • Student, Evergreen Club Contemporary Gamelan
    International and domestic students mingle during the reception at The Isabel Feb. 7.

Queen's international and domestic students, along with staff, faculty, and senior administrators gathered at The Isabel earlier this week for an evening of music and intercultural exchange. The event was the third in the International at Home series, which aims to bring together international and domestic students at several cultural events throughout the year.

This week, the community heard the unique sounds of Evergreen Club Contemporary Gamelan, an ensemble of eight highly skilled Canadian musicians who perform and record using an assortment of bronze and wooden instruments from Indonesia. These intruments are collectively known as a gamelan, a traditional instrument ensemble that plays an important role in Indonesian culture.

Ahead of the performance Feb. 7, community members mingled during a reception and had the chance to hear from some of the evening's performers about their music and history.

The International at Home series is hosted by the Office of the Associate Vice-Principal (International) and the Isabel Bader Centre for the Performing Arts. The next performance in the series will be held March 29, 2017, featuring Measha Brueggergosman.

Full details are available on the Queen’s International website. Faculties, departments, and units interested in sponsoring student tickets are asked to contact international@queensu.ca

Big Data's promise and perils for health-care delivery

Queen's in the World

Exploring Big Data, and its great promise and serious perils for the delivery of health care, will be the theme of a lecture presented at Queen’s Feb. 7 by Dartmouth College Professor Denise Anthony. The talk – titled Big Data, Cybersecurity, and Health Care – is the first lecture of the Matariki Network of Universities Lecture Series and part of the Queen’s Big Data 175th Anniversary series.

“We are very pleased to host this inaugural Matariki Network lecture. Not only is it an opportunity to deepen our connection with Dartmouth College and our other Matariki partners around the world, but it is a chance to hear from an expert, Dr. Anthony, who brings a wealth of knowledge on a subject that is pertinent to all of us,” says Daniel Woolf, Principal and Vice-Chancellor.

Denise Anthony, Vice Provost for Academic Initiatives and Professor of Sociology at Dartmouth College, will visit Queen's Feb. 6-10 and give a lecture on Big Data, cybersecurity, and heath care on Feb. 7. (Supplied photo)

In the lecture, Dr. Anthony will illuminate the important implications of rushing to turn the digital promise into reality, without understanding how Big Data analytics change institutions. For the institutions of health-care delivery, the use of Big Data will require changes in information governance that affect not only the security and privacy of health information, but also the role of patients, the profession of medicine, and the meaning of health itself, says Dr. Anthony in her abstract.

Dr. Anthony, who is vice provost for academic initiatives and professor of sociology at Dartmouth, has held adjunct appointments at the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy & Clinical Practice and at Geisel School of Medicine. She was also research director of the Institute for Security, Technology, and Society from 2008-2013.

During her visit to Queen’s, Dr. Anthony will meet with colleagues and students in the Queen’s Surveillance Studies Centre and continue to develop Queen’s-Dartmouth collaborations through visits with Queen’s senior administrators.

“I am so honoured to be part of Queen’s University’s 175th celebration. What an impressive milestone! The Matariki Network is really a unique and special partnership among seven institutions across seven countries, and this kind of international collaboration seems especially important right now in an uncertain world,” says Dr. Anthony. “I have been a long-time admirer of the Surveillance Studies Centre, and particularly the work of Professor David Lyon and his colleagues and students, who are world leaders in helping us to understand the impact – positive and negative – of Big Data in our world today. I look forward to meeting with many students and scholars at Queen’s University over the course of my visit.”

Dr. Anthony’s lecture will take place on Tuesday, Feb. 7 at 6:30 pm in the Britton Smith Foundation Lecture Theatre, School of Medicine. A reception will take place beforehand, beginning at 5:30 pm, and all are invited.

The Matariki Network of Universities is composed of seven like-minded, research-intensive universities from around the world. One of the network’s aims is to build on the collective strengths of its member institutions to develop international excellence in research and education. Within the network, each institution is responsible for advancing a key research theme, with Dartmouth focused on cybersecurity.

The Queen’s anniversary series, Big Data 175, has been designed to engage intellectually and practically with a major analytic development and pressing public issue, from multi-disciplinary and cross-campus perspectives. The series, organized by a cross-campus, multi-faculty group, has so far held three events, with more planned for 2017. Visit the website for more details.

 

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