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Internationalization

Increasing Queen's presence in China

During International Education Week – Nov. 14-18 – the Gazette will feature several stories highlighting the activities and initiatives that are advancing Queen’s international priorities.

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[Diana Chau]
As an alumna, Diana Chau, Queen's new recuiter in Beijing, is able to share the university experience with prospective students and their families. (University Communications)

As the new student recruiter for Queen’s in Beijing, Diana Chau is spreading the word about what the university has to offer to prospective students, while also gaining the experience of a lifetime.

[Tricolour Globe]
Queen's in the World

An alumna herself, Ms. Chau (Artsci’12), knows the strengths of the Queen’s experience and is looking to increase the university’s presence in China by sharing her story.

“When I talk to students and their parents, I tell them how well Queen’s does in terms of domestic achievements and how well our students do in terms of retention and graduation. I also tell them what it’s like to study at Queen’s, what the sense of community is,” she says, adding that community is not a strong concept in China. “Coming from a Canadian and Queen’s alumna, I hope to spread that idea of community to them and to tell them that Queen’s is a great university.”

Ms. Chau started the position this summer and is the second recruiter in China for Queen’s, along with Sunny Wang, who is based in Shanghai.

The Queen’s University Comprehensive International Plan (QUICP) identifies China as a priority region for student recruitment, as well as for developing academic and research partnerships.

Queen’s reputation is growing in China and this second recruiter position will help bolster student recruitment. Among our international undergraduates, there are more students from China than any other country.

Ms. Chau had previously worked in a recruiting capacity for Queen’s after graduating before heading to Beijing for a similar position with Lakehead University. However, she was excited by the opportunity to return to her alma mater, while continuing her Beijing experience.

Living and working abroad can be a challenge but Ms. Chau, who hails from the small town of Tottenham, north of Toronto, enjoys the opportunity of experiencing another culture and seeing another part of the world.

The key to success, she says, is the same as it is for international students.

“Keeping an open mind and trying to get involved, getting to know your community, meet people there because if you are alone it really makes a big difference compared to being with a crowd of friends,” she says. “Plus if you have friends you can learn more about the culture, the language.”

Queen’s has set a goal of international students comprising 10 per cent of incoming undergraduate students by 2019, and China is key to reaching the enrolment target.

“We are very excited that Diana has joined our team in China. The growth we have experience from this region reflects the strong presence we have on the ground and in the local time-zone,” says Chris Coupland, Director, International Undergraduate Enrolment. “We are extremely fortunate to now have two professional and enthusiastic alumnae providing support to prospective students and their families, as well as school counsellors and institutional partners.”  

In 2007, Queen’s became the first Canadian university to establish an office in China – the Queen’s China Liaison Office located at Fudan University in Shanghai – with the aim of building relations with partner institutions, prospective students and alumni.

In 2014, Queen’s launched a Chinese language webpage to strengthen the university’s connections with prospective Chinese students and their families.

Queen’s launched the QUICP in 2015 to support its internationalization efforts. The plan’s goals include strengthening Queen’s international research engagement and creating more opportunities for student mobility through programs like academic exchange programs. The plan also aims to attract high-quality international students to Queen’s and to increase international educational opportunities on the Queen’s campus.

A world of international opportunities

During International Education Week – Nov. 14-18 – the Gazette will feature several stories highlighting the activities and initiatives that are advancing Queen’s international priorities.

Queen's in the World

In her role as head of Queen’s international portfolio, Kathy O’Brien gets to hear many stories from students, both Canadian and international, as well as faculty members, who tell her how their international experiences have shaped and changed their lives, or their research direction. The stories they share are tales of self-exploration and transformation.

“I remember, particularly, being in China and speaking to a student who had studied in the biology field program at Queen’s University Biology Station (QUBS),” says Ms. O’Brien, Associate Vice-Principal (International).

Kathy O'Brien, Associate Vice-Principal (International), speaks with PhD student Hasan Kettaneh during an International at Home event held at the Isabel Bader Centre for the Performing Arts in October. (Photo by Garrett Elliott)

“The program is not long, just a couple of weeks, but this woman told me how the experience had allowed her to expand her thinking, and gain insight into herself, something she had not been able to experience prior to coming here. She said it made her a more confident person, and more curious about the world. I was really struck by the strong impact such a short international learning experience had on her. I also felt very privileged to hear such an intimate story and it made me think about the connection between all of us – despite the size of the world, we are all deeply connected.”

It’s this strong impact – the capacity for life-changing experiences on a personal level and transformative intercultural collaboration on the research and academic levels – that drives international education at Queen’s, and is pushing it to new levels across the university’s faculties and programming, and at a central administrative level.

International @ Queen's
• Information on International Education Week activities Nov. 14-18 is available in the Gazette.
• More information on Queen’s international activities and the Comprehensive International Plan is available on the International website.

“The opportunities for intercultural learning have never been more widespread as they are today,” says Ms. O’Brien. “Students at Queen’s have a multitude of ways to shape their international experience – on campus in Kingston, at the Bader International Study Centre (BISC) in the U.K., or with one of our trusted partners around the world. I encourage everyone to seek out new educational experiences, and ways to expand their intercultural awareness and learning.”

When Ms. O’Brien took on the international portfolio in late 2013, creating the first comprehensive plan to support the institution’s international goals was top of her list. Released in 2015, the Queen’s University Comprehensive International Plan (QUCIP) provides quantitative measures across four pillars – International Research Engagement, International Mobility, International Enrolment Management, and International at Home – to guide the university’s goals for the next several years.

“The international plan is helping the Queens’ community focus its international efforts and work towards shared goals. I frequently hear from the community about how much people appreciate having this plan and how it’s driving their decision-making,” she says.

Highlights of the past year, and future goals

In the past year, the university has seen the number of undergraduate students participating in international exchange increase by nine per cent, while the number of international exchange students on Queen’s campus increased by 22 per cent. Several new international collaborative academic programs were initiated, including a dual-degree opportunity at the master’s level through Smith School of Business, with ESSEC Business School Paris-Singapore, a dual research degree in chemistry at the master’s level with the University of Stuttgart, Germany, and a “2 + 2” program, which will see undergraduate students from Beijing Normal University transfer to Queen’s for the final two years of their program in the field of biology.

“Our international recruitment team and our international exchange coordinators in the faculties have done excellent work to increase our international student population on campus,” says Ms. O’Brien. “Our deans, faculty members, and faculty international officers are developing new and creative academic programs in collaboration with our international partners, and encouraging our students to go abroad.”

"We want to seek more ways to engage and listen to our students about their international learning experiences – to inform our programs and services, and to build our international story."
—Kathy O'Brien, Associate Vice-Principal (International)

Ms. O’Brien and her team will build on this momentum in the current academic year, placing emphasis on the need to keep increasing faculty and student mobility, to work collaboratively to highlight the BISC and its distinctive programming, and to find more ways to show the world how Queen’s international research collaborations are making a direct impact and contribution.

Over the past several years, Queen’s has focused on three regions to build partnerships and opportunities: China, the U.K., and the U.S. With progress being made in all those areas, Ms. O’Brien says there is now a strong desire for the university to broaden its scope and make efforts to find institutional collaborations with areas in Africa, Latin America, and Southeast Asia.

“We also want to seek more ways to engage and listen to our students about their international learning experiences – to inform our programs and services, and to build our international story,” she says.

International engagement and community-building

While the QUCIP is new, Queen’s international story – and its deep international engagement – is not, as noted by Principal Daniel Woolf in his introduction in the strategic planning document. In fact, Ms. O’Brien says every day she learns about a new international research initiative, an international faculty member visit, or an international student experience.

“That’s one of the challenges – it is difficult to know the breadth and depth of the existing international collaborations and to recognize everyone who is contributing to the progress of our international plan. Another challenge is how to position Queen’s globally. Our education and research is exceptional but we need to determine what specific areas Queen’s wants to be known for internationally. There are choices to be made.”

Despite the challenges, the solid international foundation at Queen’s, the positive progress on performance indicators (noted in the QUCIP annual report, to be released in January 2017), and the momentum and enthusiasm around internationalization on campus, all point to a strong future.

“The community-building that is happening at Queen’s around internationalization is like nothing I have ever experienced in my 13 years at the university,” says Ms. O’Brien. “The positive conversations and exchange of ideas, the inspiring stories, the support advancing international education and research – it all makes me very proud.”

 

Celebrating International Education Week

During International Education Week – Nov. 14-18 – the Gazette will feature several stories highlighting Queen’s international activities and priorities.

The Queen’s community joins worldwide celebrations Nov. 14-18 for International Education Week, an annual initiative that showcases the importance of international education and its significant impact on students and campuses around the globe.

“This week provides an occasion to celebrate, as a Queen’s community, our diversity and the multitude of international initiatives and collaborations we have available to our students,” says Kathy O’Brien, Associate Vice-Principal (International). “Queen’s is looking past the borders of our Kingston campus and seeking different ways to provide our students with a variety of opportunities to help them shape their international experience while they are here.”

The Queen’s University International Centre (QUIC) and the International Programs Office (IPO) have coordinated several events during International Education Week, which include:

Monday, Nov. 14:

Tuesday, Nov. 15:

Wednesday, Nov. 16:

Thursday, Nov. 17:

Friday, Nov. 18:

  • International Programs Office (IPO) 20th anniversary – 3-5 pm, IPO, B206 Mackintosh-Corry Hall
International students gather during orientation events in January 2016. (Photo by Bernard Clark)

Queen’s launched its Comprehensive International Plan in August 2015 to support its internationalization efforts. The plan’s goals include strengthening Queen’s international research engagement and creating more opportunities for student mobility through academic exchange and study-abroad programs. The plan also aims to attract high-quality international students to Queen’s and to increase international educational opportunities on Queen’s campus.

In the past year, the university has seen the number of undergraduate students participating in international exchange increase by nine per cent, while the number of international exchange students on Queen’s campus increased by 22 per cent. Several new international collaborative academic programs were initiated, including a dual-degree opportunity at the master’s level through Smith School of Business, with ESSEC Business School Paris-Singapore, a dual research degree in chemistry at the master’s level with the University of Stuttgart, Germany, and a “2 + 2” program, which will see  undergraduate students from Beijing Normal University transfer to Queen’s for the final two years of their program in the field of biology.

For more information on International Education Week activities and other campus international initiatives, visit the International website.

 

 

Rehabilitation initiative celebrates 25th anniversary

Queen’s International Centre for the Advancement of Community Based Rehabilitation (ICACBR) celebrates 25 years as leader in inclusion and human rights.

  • Principal Daniel Woolf speaks at the 25th anniversary celebration for the International Centre for the Advancement of Community Based Rehabilitation (ICACBR)
    Principal Daniel Woolf speaks at the 25th anniversary celebration for the International Centre for the Advancement of Community Based Rehabilitation (ICACBR)
  • Founder and former executive director of the ICACBR, Dr. Malcolm Peat reflects on 25 years of the centre's work - helping individuals with disabilities around the world.
    Founder and former executive director of the ICACBR, Dr. Malcolm Peat reflects on 25 years of the centre's work - helping individuals with disabilities around the world.
  • Dr. Richard Reznick, Dean of the Faculty of Health Sciences, congratulates the centre on their 25 year anniversary and speaks to the centre's past and future projects.
    Dr. Richard Reznick, Dean of the Faculty of Health Sciences, congratulates the centre on their 25 year anniversary and speaks to the centre's past and future projects.
  • Dr. Heather Aldersey, Director of the centre's Access to Health and Education for all Children and Youth with Disabilities in Bangladesh (AHEAD) program, thanks the centre's past and present researchers, as they set their sights on the next 25 years of community based rehabilitation work around the globe.
    Dr. Heather Aldersey, Director of the centre's Access to Health and Education for all Children and Youth with Disabilities in Bangladesh (AHEAD) program, thanks the centre's past and present researchers, as they set their sights on the next 25 years of community based rehabilitation work around the globe.

Queen's in the World

Researchers, students and faculty from the Faculty of Health Sciences and the School of Rehabilitation Therapy gathered on Oct. 27 to celebrate the milestone 25th anniversary of the International Centre for the Advancement of Community Based Rehabilitation (ICACBR). The event featured past and current members of the centre, and presented an opportunity to look back on past projects as well as ongoing efforts to expand community based rehabilitation (CBR) practices in communities around the world.

The international cohort of Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Scholars  in the School of Rehabilitation Therapy deliver brief Pecha Kucha presentations on their work.

“Just as (founder and former executive director of the ICACBR) Malcolm Peat and the other founders envisioned, the Centre has advanced the knowledge and practice of CBR, and has provided a platform for training the next generation of practitioners and researchers,” says Terry Krupa, Professor and Associate Director (Research and Post-Professional Programs) in the School of Rehabilitation Therapy. “The Centre has demonstrated how the resources of a university can be harnessed and structured to make a real difference in the world, responding in a timely, effective and collaborative manner to issues of disability, health and well-being in low resource settings, and in settings impacted by conflict, political upheaval and natural disasters.”

Past and present ICACBR researchers and students gathered to celebrate the centre's 25th anniversary.

The centre currently manages three projects – the Access to Health & Education for all Disabled Children & Youth (AHEAD) project in Bangladesh, the Queen Elizabeth II Scholarships for Excellence in International Community Based Rehabilitation, and a participatory project on stigma and intellectual disability in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The AHEAD program works in concert with the Centre for the Paralyzed (CRP) and Bangladesh Health Professionals Institute (BHPI) to improve access to health and education services for children and youth as a means of reducing poverty and promoting inclusion. The QE II project supports Canadian OT and RHBS students to research and train in Bangladesh, India and Tanzania, as well as provides opportunities for CBR leaders from low- and middle-income countries to pursue PhDs in RHBS at Queen’s. The Congo project is focused on reducing the stigma around intellectual disabilities in the capital, Kinshasa. 

“The anniversary is an important milestone, in that it marks 25 years of international collaboration with people with disabilities, their families, and the organizations that serve them,” says Heather Aldersey, Director of the AHEAD Project and a Queen’s National Scholar in International Community Based Rehabilitation. “The ICACBR has always placed great emphasis on working directly with communities on issues of greatest priority to them. The future will be no different, and we will continue to work in close collaboration with our partners to build community capacity for inclusion.”

Past and present researchers and students watch a slideshow presentation on the centre's 25 years of service, working to bring community based rehabilitation to areas in need around the globe.

In addition to the centre’s ongoing projects, ICACBR researchers have played a crucial role in the development of CBR as a tool to provide rehabilitation services in conflict and post-conflict zones. The centre was a leading player in post-war health and social reconstruction after the conflicts in the Balkans, providing training for over 500 local healthcare practitioners and creating over 40 accessible CBR health centres. Over 200 researchers and practitioners – including professionals from the Canadian rehabilitation and disability communities, as well as Queen’s students and faculty – have been involved in ICACBR projects and research.

“The 25th anniversary is a really great opportunity for both the School of Rehabilitation Therapy and for ICACBR, because it’s a chance to recognize the progression from the early work the centre did that was so foundational to development of community-based rehabilitation internationally,” says Rosemary Lysaght, Associate Director (Occupational Therapy Program), School of Rehabilitation Therapy. “There’s much to reflect on from our past as we look ahead to the next 25 years. There’s so much opportunity and still, sadly, so much need in the world. The ICACBR provides a lot of leadership and it’s a real opportunity to solidify how we move forward as the early leaders retire and as new opportunities arise.”

Defying the odds

Stefanie Reid, Artsci’06, won a silver medal at the 2016 Rio Paralympic Games in  in the T44 long jump. She will be a a guest speaker at the Tricolour Reception in London, on Nov. 10, at Canada House. (Photo courtesy stefreid.com)

There is no question that Queen’s tricolour pride extends beyond borders but in the case of Stefanie Reid, Artsci’06, Queen’s is where the heart is.

After she lost her foot in 2000 in a boating accident, her dreams of becoming a professional rugby player came to a halt.  

Jump ahead 15 years, and Ms. Reid, a citizen of Canada, Great Britain and New Zealand, has defied the odds and continues to excel as an athlete at an elite level. This past summer at the Rio Paralympic Games, she captured Great Britain’s first medal, winning silver in the T44 long jump. Ms. Reid stayed in Rio after her competition to serve as a commentator for the UK’s Channel 4 TV for the remainder of the games.

Ms. Reid will join Principal Daniel Woolf, Artsci’80, as a guest speaker at the Tricolour Reception in London, UK, taking place Nov. 10, at Canada House.

“I was really touched when London Branch President Naazin Adatia-Hirst reached out to me before Rio 2016 and let me know I would have local support in London,” says the three-time Paralympian and five-time world record holder. “I’m thrilled to be invited to speak at the upcoming Tricolour Reception in London, which will be a great opportunity to reconnect and meet other alumni.”

As an alumnus and champion of Queen’s international reputation, Principal Woolf will travel to London in support of the Queen’s University Comprehensive International Plan (QUICP).

“It will be a great honour to have such an inspirational alumna as Stefanie Reid join other alumni and share her experience as an athlete on the world stage,” says Principal Woolf. “The goal for the London trip is to connect with the many alumni in the region who are enhancing Queen’s reputation and highlighting the value of a Queen’s education to prospective students while building a strong alumni network.”

This won’t be the first time that Principal Woolf and Ms. Reid shared a stage. In 2009, Ms. Reid was recognized by the Queen’s University Alumni Association (QUAA) with the One-to-Watch award at a gala dinner hosted by Principal Woolf and the QUAA.

Her long list of accomplishments includes being the first British amputee to model at London Fashion Week when she opened Lenie Boya’s 2015 show wearing a bespoke chandelier blade prosthesis.

Ms. Reid competed in London 2012, capturing silver in the T44 long jump. She also competed in the 2008 Beijing Paralympic Games where she won a bronze medal in the 200-metre event and placed fifth in the long jump. In 2007, she was named the Paralympics’ Ontario top female athlete of the year at the Ontario Para Sports Awards. During the 2007 season, she broke the Canadian long jump record in the F44 class (single, below knee amputation), a record which had stood since 1988. She would later better the mark on two occasions and close out the season with a new Canadian record of 4.78 metres.

Fifteen years ago, shortly after her accident in 2001, she was inspired by the Queen’s track and field team, catching glimpses of the practices from her home. With the assistance and encouragement of Queen’s coach Wayne Bulak, she joined the team to see just how fast she could still run. By her fourth year at Queen’s, Ms. Reid was traveling regularly to competitions with the varsity team and was nominated for a major CIS award.  She won the Ontario University Athletics Community Service Award in track and field during the 2006-07 season.

Upon graduation, Ms. Reid put her plans to attend medical school aside and focused on her childhood dream of being a professional athlete.  She is married to Canadian Paralympian Brett Lakatos, a wheelchair racer whose six Paralympic medals join her three at their home in Loughborough, UK.

Join Ms. Reid and Principal Woolf at the Tricolour Reception in London, UK on Nov. 10 and stay tuned for a Q&A session that will be published on the Queen's Alumni website.Visit the Queen's Alumni website to register online.

Visit the Queen’s Alumni Review website to learn more about Ms. Reid’s story.

2+2 agreement signed with UAE university

[CUD Agreement]
Provost and Vice-Principal (Academic) Benoit-Antoine Bacon and Karim Chelli, President and Vice-Chancellor of the Canadian University Dubai, sign an agreement between the two institutions creating a 2+2 pathway Bachelor of Computing (Honours) degree program. (University Communications)
Queen's in the World

Officials from the Canadian University Dubai (CUD) recently visited Queen’s to sign an agreement creating a 2+2 pathway program.

The agreement follows a series of meetings between the two institutions. 

The agreement allows for qualified CUD students to transfer into the Bachelor of Computing (Honours) degree program in the Faculty of Arts and Science after completing their second year of studies.  

A cohort of five to 20 undergraduate students annually would be eligible to transfer to Queen’s to complete the final two years of their program in the School of Computing. 

Located in the heart of Dubai, CUD offers students the opportunity of a Canadian-based curriculum while experiencing the culture and values of United Arab Emirates (UAE).  Founded in 2006, the Canadian University Dubai currently consists of the School of Architecture and Interior Design, the School of Business, the School of Engineering, Applied Science and Technology and the School of Environment and Health. 

All programs at CUD are accredited by the Ministry of Education Higher Education Affairs of the UAE to award degrees/qualifications in higher education.

Cutting-edge music and cross-cultural exchange

  • Isabel-International at Home
    International and domestic students, as well as staff, faculty, and senior administration gather at the Isabel on Oct. 13 for a performance by Collectif9, the first in the International at Home series. (Garrett Elliott photo)
  • Hasan Kettaneh
    PhD student Hasan Kettaneh mingles during the pre-concert reception at the Isabel. (Garrett Elliott photo)
  • O'Brien-Lina-Hasan Kattaneh
    Kathy O'Brien, Associate Vice-Principal (International), chats with PhD students Leena Yahia and Hasan Kettaneh. (Garrett Elliott photo)
  • Collectif9-Andrea Stewart
    Andrea Stewart, Collectif9 cellist (left), welcomes students, along with Csilla Volford, Coordinator, International Projects and Events, and Tricia Baldwin, Director of the Isabel. Ms. Stewart gave a brief talk to students about the band's formation and philosophy. (Garrett Elliott photo)
  • International students
    Domestic and international Queen's students gather during the pre-concert reception. (Garrett Elliott photo)
  • Mofi Badmos-Kathy O'Brien
    Mofi Badmos, Queen's University International Centre Intern, shares a laugh with Kathy O'Brien, Associate Vice-Principal (International). (Garrett Elliott photo)

International and domestic students at Queen's came together recently for an evening of cutting-edge music and cross-cultural exchange at the first perfomance in the International at Home series at the Isabel.

Students, as well as faculty, staff, and senior university administrators, met at a reception before the musical performance – by Montreal's Collectif9 – and had a chance to hear about the string band's philosophy from one of its cellists, Andrea Stewart. 

The series, which will feature Ashley MacIsaac, Measha Brueggergosman, and Evergreen Club Contemporary Gamelan in future events, is hosted by the Office of the Associate Vice-Principal (International) and the Isabel Bader Centre for the Performing Arts.

In order to bring all students out for the upcoming events, organizers are asking faculties and units across campus to sponsor pairs of tickets, which will be distributed equally to international and domestic students to attend a performance together. The Isabel will then match each ticket purchased one-to-one (with the exception of the Ashley MacIsaac concert), with all tickets provided to interested students.

Full details are available on the Queen’s International website. Faculties, departments, and units interested in sponsoring student tickets are asked to contact international@queensu.ca Ticket prices range from $14-$18.

 

Focus on Africa

An upcoming conference hosted by Queen’s will put the focus on advancing human rights and health for sexual minorities in Africa.

{QAD 2016)“Reimagining Global Solidarities for LGBTQI ‘empowerment’ in Africa,” being held Friday Oct. 21-Sunday, Oct. 23, will bring together more than 20 African and North American scholars, activists, and government officials to brainstorm new approaches and discuss the attainment of human rights and dignity for sexual minorities in Africa.

The first day of the event is the Queen’s Africa Day Colloquium, which is aimed at fostering dialogue between Queen’s students, faculty, staff, and the wider Queen’s and Kingston communities. Hosted at the Agnes Etherington Art Centre the colloquium will bring together researchers, academic associations and community associations with interests in Africa-related issues for discussions as well as to celebrate African arts and culture through music and art. A number of activities are scheduled throughout the day, including a lunchtime talk by David Kuria Mbote, executive director of the Gay and Lesbian Coalition of Kenya.

On Saturday and Sunday a workshop bringing together researchers from Queen’s and Dartmouth, both members of the Matariki Network of Universities, will be held at the Agnes Etherington Art Centre and Theological Hall. Other delegates will be coming to Queen’s from Global Affairs Canada, and universities in Canada, the United States and South Africa.

The workshop is aimed at highlighting the ongoing work by graduate students and faculty at Queen’s, explains organizer Marc Epprecht, head of the Department of Global Development Studies. Dr. Epprecht says that the workshop is also aimed at fostering a “long-term and robust relationship between Queen’s and Dartmouth College focused on the study of Africa.”

“Dartmouth has several notable scholars on faculty, a world-class collection of African art and undergrad exchange programs to Africa,” he adds. “We will reach out from this partnership to connect to our other Matariki partners such as Durham University, which established the first Western-style university college in Africa nearly 200 years ago (Fourah Bay College, Sierra Leone). We hope through this network to get delegates to come to Queen’s for the Canadian Association of African Studies conference to be hosted here in May 2018, and to make that conference a truly international event.”

Highlights include a debate entitled “Where do we Go From Here?” featuring Liesl Theron, co-founder and former executive director of Gender Dynamix, John McAllister, a former lecturer with the University of Botswana and S.N. Nyeck, an independent scholar. Other panel discussion will focus on the perspectives of governments and donors as well as for African activists. Ms Theron will also be giving the SNID lecture on Thursday, Oct. 20, entitled “Trans Nation: What has changed for trans people in South Africa”.

More information and schedules can be found at the Queen’s Africa Day page on Facebook.

Exchange of ideas

Queen’s student, professor head to the United States for research opportunities.

A Queen’s law professor and a cultural studies doctoral candidate are heading south of the border to participate in a research exchange. Heading north to Canada from the United States are a political studies PhD candidate and a business professor. The swap is part of the Fulbright Canada Exchange Program.

Queen’s PhD candidate Taylor Currie (Cultural Studies) has been selected to participate in the research exchange of a lifetime as she heads to the University of Maryland as part of the exchange. Ms. Currie is studying the past public relations campaigns of Dupont and how they impacted the American public.

Participating in the Fulbright exchange are, from left: Allan Manson, Taylor Currie, Josh Tupler and Jay Liebowitz.

“I really want to immerse myself in the American academic culture,” says Ms. Currie. “Earning a Fulbright is a dream come true because of how close I will be located to the National Archives of America, which is vital to my research. I’ll also have access to the Hagley Museum and Library, a business archive containing all of Dupont’s files.”

Ms. Currie’s mentor while at the University of Maryland is Professor David Sicilia.

Meanwhile, Dartmouth College’s PhD candidate Josh Tupler is heading to Queen’s to study in the Centre for International and Defence Policy (CIDP) and will conduct research with CIDP director Stefanie von Hlatky.

The focus of Mr. Tupler’s work at Queen’s will be Canada’s and NATO’s decision to use military force in the post-Cold War era. He chose the centre because of its focus on military policy. He also has a relationship with former director of the CIDP David Haglund (Political Studies).

“I was drawn to Fulbright because the programs focus on developing cross-cultural connections, and I was drawn to Queen’s and the CIPD in particular because of the centre’s focus on military policy,” says Mr. Tupler. “I am excited to work with the three colonels who are serving as visiting defense fellows, and help develop the relationship between the CIDP and the Royal Military College of Canada.”

Two professors will also be completing an exchange under the Fulbright Canada program. Emeritus Professor Allan Manson (Law) will participate in an exchange to the University of California to research Nunavut’s unique single-level trial court system.

Heading to Canada is Jay Liebowitz (Harrisburg University of Science and Technology). Dr. Liebowitz will collaborate   with Queen’s professors Yolande Chan and Jay Handelman (School of Business) during the summer 2017 as the Fulbright Visiting Research Chair in Business.  Their research will focus on the use of intuition for IT innovation.

Fulbright Canada encourages and promotes bi-national collaborative research on topics that reflect the broad range of contemporary issues relevant to Canada, the United States, and the relationship between the two countries. Fulbright Canada provides the opportunity for outstanding Canadian students to pursue graduate study and/or research in the United States.

For more information on the Fulbright Canada exchange program visit the website.

A new link with China

[China University of Geosciences Visit]
A delegation from the China University of Geosciences recently visited Queen’s. From left: Pian Huayan, Translator, International Cooperation Office; Cai Min, Deputy Director, International Cooperation Office; Wang Genhou, Dean of School of Earth Sciences and Resources; Wang Hongbing, University Council Chairman; Principal Daniel Woolf; Kathy O’Brien, Associate Vice-Principal (International); and Hugh Horton, Interim Vice-Dean, Faculty of Arts and Science. (University Communications)

Queen’s Principal Daniel Woolf recently met with a delegation from the China University of Geosciences to solidify a partnership between the two institutions.

[Queen's International]
Queen's in the World

“I am delighted to continue building upon the strong relationship that we have fostered over the years with our counterparts in China, including this new collaboration with the distinguished China University of Geosciences,” said Principal Woolf during remarks at the signing in Richardson Hall.

Wang Hongbing, University Council Chairman for the China University of Geosciences, Beijing (CUGB), signed the new agreements on behalf of CUGB and also offered remarks during the meeting.

The new agreement between Queen’s and the Beijing university includes a general memorandum of understanding with Queen’s Faculty of Arts and Science and the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science. In particular, the new agreement will make available opportunities for CUGB students to study in Queen’s Department of Geological Science and Geological Engineering.

During the visit, the Chinese delegation met with Queen’s officials in Arts and Science, and Engineering and Applied Science, took a campus tour, and enjoyed a lunch hosted by Kathy O’Brien, Associate Vice-Principal (International).

Queen’s launched its Comprehensive International Plan in August 2015 to support its internationalization efforts. The plan’s goals include strengthening Queen’s international research engagement and creating more opportunities for student mobility through programs like academic exchange programs. The plan also aims to attract high-quality international students to Queen’s and to increase international educational opportunities on the Queen’s campus.

For more information on the Queen’s-China connection, visit the Queen’s International website.

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