Department of History

Department of History
Department of History

Will Langford

Ph.D. Candidate/Teaching Fellow

 

Email: w.langford@queensu.ca
 

 


About

Will Langford is a teaching fellow, doctoral candidate, and Joseph-Armand Bombardier Canada Graduate Scholarship recipient in the Department of History at Queen’s University.  His research focuses on twentieth-century Canadian political history in a global context.

Current Research

'Helping People Help Themselves': Democracy, Development, and the Global Politics of Poverty in Canada, 1964-1979

This study examines the relationship between democracy, development, and poverty in mid-twentieth century Canada.  It analyzes three Canadian development programs - unfolding, respectively, on community, regional, and international scales - within an integrated framework. The project situates the on-the-ground activism of reformers and radicals in dialogue with the global context in which they consciously rooted their work.
 

Teaching

HIST 390-002, A History of Global Development (Fall 2016-Winter 2017)
HIST 124 CDS, Canada and the World (Summer 2015)
 

Publications

Articles

“Jean Lagassé, Community Development, and the “Indian and Métis Problem” in 1950s-1960s Manitoba,” Canadian Historical Review 97, no. 3 (2016): 346-376.

“Friendship Centres in Canada, 1959-1977,” American Indian Quarterly 40, no. 1 (2016): 1-37.

“Gerald Sutton Brown and the Discourse of City Planning Expertise, 1953-1959,” Urban History Review/Revue d’histoire urbaine 41, no. 2 (Spring 2013): 30-41.

“‘Is Sutton Brown God?’ Planning Expertise and the Local State in Vancouver, 1953-1972,” BC Studies 173 (Spring 2012): 11-39.
 

Reviews

Review of Ruth Compton Brouwer, Canada’s Global Villagers: CUSO in Development, 1961-1986 (Vancouver: UBC Press, 2013), The Sixties: A Journal of History, Politics, and Culture 9, no. 1 (2016): 148-150.

Review of Daniel Immerwahr, Thinking Small: The United States and the Lure of Community Development (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2015), International Affairs 91, no. 2 (March 2015): 420-421.

Review of Christopher Klemek, The Transatlantic Collapse of Urban Renewal: Postwar Urbanism from New York to Berlin (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2011), Urban History Review/Revue d’histoire urbaine 41, no. 2 (Spring 2013): 51-52.

Selected Conference Papers

“Indigenous Politics, Poverty, and Development in Lesser Slave Lake, Alberta, 1966-1976,” conference presentation at “Stories/Les histoires,” the 2016 Canadian Historical Association Annual Meeting, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, 30 May-1 June 2016.

“DEVCO, its Transatlantic Sheep, and the Development of Cape Breton,” conference presentation at “Rethinking Interdisciplinarity in History,” the 2015 Canadian Historical Association Annual Meeting, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, 1-3 June 2015.

“‘Indian’ Integration and Applied Social Science in 1950s-1960s Canada,” conference presentation at “Inequality: Politics, Policy, and the Past,” the 39th Annual Meeting of the Social Science History Association, Royal York Hotel, Toronto, Ontario, 6-9 November 2014.