Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures

DEPARTMENT OF

Languages, Literatures and Cultures

DEPARTMENT OF

Languages, Literatures and Cultures

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Karl Hardy                                                   

Assistant Professor

American studies, Canadian studies, cultural studies, critical race studies, colonial/settler, colonial studies

E-mail: karl.hardy@queensu.ca
Phone:TBA
Office:TBA
Office hours: TBA

Education

Ph. D. Cultural Studies, Queen’s University, 2015
M. A. Social Ecology & Social Theory, Prescott College, 2008
B. A. Political Science, University of Washington, 2000

About

Professor Karl Hardy recently completed his PhD in Cultural Studies here at Queen’s University. His research interests include American studies, Canadian studies, cultural studies, critical race studies, colonial/settler colonial studies, feminist methodologies, film studies, global development studies, Indigenous studies, literary studies, postcolonial studies, science fiction studies, social ecology, and utopian studies. His recent publications include  “Unsettling Hope: Settler-Colonialism and Utopianism” – Spaces of Utopia, An Electronic Journal, 2nd series, no. 1, 2012, pp. 123-136; “Introduction”, “Roundtable Q&A with Jacqueline Dutton, Daniel Heath Justice, Kim Stanley Robinson, and Lorenzo Veracini ” & “Selected Bibliography”. He is also a guest editor of  “Utopias!” – Special Issue of Puerto Del Sol­ 47.2 Fall 2012

Teaching is fundamental to how Professor Hardy understands himself as a scholar. He endeavours to maintain commitments to critical self-awareness and global social-ecological consciousness as a means of ongoing scholarly praxis. In his teaching he draws upon this foundation while seeking to be dynamic, engaged, and flexible to facilitate student learning, and, in doing so,he is necessarily co-learning alongside his students. Professor Hardy's primary goal is to empower students to recognize themselves as critical and reflexive thinkers and actors in both their academic careers and as members of a global social-ecological community. He views student learning as the result of sustained collaborative engagement and shared responsibility. In his experience, student learning occurs when students are compelled to take an active role and to dedicate themselves to the experience of learning as a matter of cultivating themselves and their ethical relationship to the wider world.

Teaching

Professor Hardy is teaching following course:

LLCU 209: Rio de Janeiro:the Marvelous City (on-line)