Dr. Roberta Lamb

  • B.Mus.Ed. (Univ. of Portland)
  • M.Mus.Ed. (Univ. of Portland)
  • Ed.D. (Columbia)

Associate Professor (Music Education)

Concurrent Education Advisor

Coordinator: Music Education

Email: lambr@queensu.ca

Web Site: http://post.queensu.ca/~lambr/

Dr. Roberta Lamb

I am an associate professor in music and music education, as well as the Chair of Undergraduate Studies (Winter 2011). I teach music education courses to prepare undergraduate students to go on to a Faculty of Education to complete their B.Ed. degree. I also teach undergraduate music history courses on women and gender issues in music. I am cross-appointed to the Department of Women's Studies and the Faculty of Education. This means that I work with undergraduate students in Women's Studies and/or graduate students in education on thesis topics and directed studies topics. Internationally, I assist at the Sibleius  Academy, Helsinki, Finland  by online advising graduate students in music education.

My research is in gender in music and music education. Currently I am completing a research project on Ruth Crawford Seeger as a music educator. I have studied the master teacher or mentor/apprentice model of music instruction, written feminist critiques of music education theory and philosophy and explored issues of sexuality in music and education. My music education research on Ruth Crawford Seeger is recognized by ethnomusicologists and historical musicologists. One  recently published chapter is "Composing and Teaching as Dissonant Counterpoint" (Chapter 10, pp 234-262), in Ruth Crawford Seeger's Worlds: Innovation and Tradition in Twentieth-century American Music, Ellie Hisama & Ray Allen, Editors. Rochester : University of Rochester, 2007. My most important publication in gender studies is the first review chapter on feminist music education research in "Feminism, Feminist Research and Gender Research In Music Education: A selective review" [in The New Handbook of Research on Music Teaching and Learning, Richard Colwell & Carol Richardson, editors; New York: Oxford University Press, 2002 (pp.648-674)], as well as the keynote address for Feminist Theory and Music 6, July 2001. Recent publications: "Talkin' Musical Identities Blues" for ACT: Action, Criticism & Theory for Music Education; and, reprint of "Tone deaf/Symphonies singing: Sketches for a musicale", in Visions of Research in Music Education.

I participate in women's organizations, community organizations and unions.

I began my teaching career in Oregon as a school music specialist. I taught flute and other woodwind instruments in my own studio and performed professionally as a flutist up through the 1980s. When I came to Canada , I taught at Brandon University, Manitoba before arriving at Queen's University in 1988.