Queen's University

Smaller crowds, few incidents over the weekend

 
2010-09-27

Kingston Police kept city streets open and clear over the weekend. An estimated 1,500 people – significantly fewer than last year – gathered throughout the student village on Saturday night. But the streets were quiet by 1 am.

“Although there was lots of activity, there were no significant issues that we are aware of,” says John Pierce, Associate V-P and Dean of Student Affairs. “We are pleased with the good judgment shown by many of our students, as well as alumni, who were in town this weekend. We are hopeful this will continue over the fall.”

Although liquor-related charges were down, police reported the same number of arrests as last year. Approximately 90 people were arrested throughout the weekend, mostly for public intoxication. Less than half of these were Queen’s students.

“We continue to encourage Queen’s students to make safe and responsible decisions about what they do and where they go every day and every night out,” says Dr. Pierce. “We expect they will adhere to the Student Code of Conduct and be respectful of the community in which they now live.”

Dr. Pierce says Queen’s is committed to continuing to work with the city, residents, the Alma Mater Society and students and alumni, year round, to build positive relationships and break the cycle of the unsafe parties that had become linked to fall homecoming.

Principal Daniel Woolf will assess the situation at the end of the calendar year. He has said the cycle of annual street parties must be well and truly broken before he considers reinstating fall homecoming. This may take a few more years.

“The fastest way to bring homecoming back is for everyone to do their part – students and alumni – to help break the cycle of what had become an annual illegal and dangerous street party,” says Dr. Pierce.
 

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